20 Ga Suggetions for 10 Year old

Duck Assassin

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I would like to get some opinions' from persons that have kids shooting 20 Gauges. My son is going to be 10 he has a 20 Ga single shot with shortened stock to fit him. This shotgun gives a kick and he hesitates shooting. Has anyone had experieiances with one make type verses others and felt the differences in recoil. Which has the least ? I do not reload.
 

Chance

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My wife is just getting started in shooting.  She's pretty small and not interested in dealing with heavy recoil.  I ended buying her a Benelli Montefletro with a cut down stock and upgraded recoil pad.  It is a very soft shooter.  3" magnums do not bother her at all.  This is probably way more money than you're willing spend though.  We have over a grand tied up in this gun.  I felt ok about spending the money because I figured it would be a lifetime gun versus something she would grow out of.
 

Speckmisser

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When I started shooting, I was a little scrawny guy.  That old H&R single shot we all learned on was kinda rough, but I adapted.  However, when I switched to a pump gun, it helped an awful lot.  The extra weight probably accounted for the difference.

Of course, a gas-operated semi-auto is going to probably be the easiest to deal with, but I personally don't care much for semi-autos.  I also have some minor issues about turning a kid loose in the field with something that shoots as fast as he can pull the trigger.
 

Jay

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Any single shot is going to kick like a mule.

My suggestion is to get a pump or semi-auto and put in an extra plug so that it will only shoot one shell at a time.
 

KID CREOLE

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I'd look for a Remington 20-LT 3" Magnum with a youth stock, not too bad of a kick!
 

Quacker Wacker

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I picked up a Mossberg 20 ga youth model for my 60lb 10 year old last year.  The only problem he had was holding it up for very long.  The kick never bothered him.  He is a year older and about 8lbs heavier and is doing much better.  For the money it is a great starter gun.  I don't recommend spending much money on a gun that will end up with a cut down stock and the Mossberg fits the bill, paid under $200 at Wildsports in Sacramento brand new.  By the way on opening day of duck season last year, the first bird after legal shoot time was a drake woodie that came in about 40 yards out, I missed and it swung around still at about 35 yards, I told my son it was too far out.  Of course he didn't listen and smoked it with one shot.  Makes for a great memory.
 

steve

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I would go with either the mossburg or remington youth 20 gauge pump he can use it as a single shot till both of you are comfortable with 3.The only problem you might have besides him dumping ducks quicker than you is out growing it faster.Fortunatly for me I have 3 boys so ours will see plenty of use before becoming to small.
One other thought also if he was shooting the single shot without a hunting jacket on,its going to fill better when he does.
 

hunthog

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Definately a Remington Lt-20 3".  Like shooting a 410 pump with excellent killing power shooting steel or, especially, Bismuth, etc.  Look on http://www.auctionarms.com.  Some good deals there.

hunthog
 

QALHNTR

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<font face="Tahoma">Having just gone through this same situation last year with my daughter......

A gas operated semi-auto will definitely have the least felt recoil.

We opted for a Beretta Urika 391 youth.  It was $649.00.  With two more hunters coming up through the ranks it made sense.  The Beretta is almost identical in weight to the Remington semi, but the Beretta distributes the mass towards the back of the gun.  My daughter noticed immediately that it was easier to hold up.

I handled the quick-as-you-can-shoot syndrome by only allowing her to load one shell at a time.  It made her focus on making that first shot count.  Later in the day, she was allowed two shells.  The second day, she graduated to three shells.  She's made a few mistakes as any eleven year old would.  But, I'd rather have her at my side than some of the slob dove hunters you see on opening day.

Good luck on your choice.</font>
 

Speckmisser

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Hunthog mentioned something that I think should be re-emphasized...

If your son is gonna be shooting that 20 ga. at ducks, then I'd strongly recommend getting him into some of the heavier hitting non-toxic loads.  It'll hit your pocket a little harder (especially with a kid shooting), but it'll increase his clean kills and thus increase his confidence and enjoyment of the sport.

I'm not knocking the 20 ga.  I shot one for years, and it's still my all-time favorite shotgun ('til it got stolen).  That little pump gun killed an awful lot of woodies and teal.  But I remember shooting lead at scaup and other big ducks, and having a heck of a time scratching them down. I never used that one with steel, but I do know that steel out of a 12ga seems to barely hurt some ducks (hence the 3.5" magnums).  

It's hard to teach a kid to limit his range and pick ideal shot angles, especially in a first season.  Letting him shoot hevi-shot or Bismuth will allow him to make some basic mistakes and still get birds.  Also, getting him out to practice A LOT at the clays range would be a good way to keep him from wasting those expensive rounds in the blind.

All just suggestions.  Go for what you know.
 

Matt in MO

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Good suggestions above. I would add quality ear protection, especially when shooting clay. Ten year olds still have great hearing (dad's is going downhill), and a lot of the pain of shooting is the NOISE. Have them put in the foam earplugs AND earmuffs when shooting. Try it yourself too, makes shooting a 30-06 pleasant!
 

Duck Assassin

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Speckmiser
Great point, taking out several novices in the past I have noticed they have a hard time seeing ducks and by the time they do it is usually to late. Shooting with 1 shell at a time shouldn't be too bad on the pocket book.
 

Mike Riley

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Depending on your child’s size and maturity you might want to look at this approach. My son has been shooting an 1187 since he was 9 and smacks birds better than most adults. The key is there are youth stocks readily available for the 1187. The 1187 is a fairly heavy gun, but if your child is large and can handle the weight there are some big advantages.
1) Auto's by their natural have less recoil
2) The additional weight lessens recoil and helps the shooter continue their swing
3) Good dove & HV 12ga shells are always on sale
4) When junior grows up you can reattach the adult stock and not have to buy another gun down the road.

My son is now 11 and in his 3rd season shooting an 1187 with no problems. To give you idea on size he is currently 5-8, 145 lbs, and was roughly 5-1 and a little over 100 lbs when he first started shooting the 1187. Prior to the 1187 he shot an American arms single, then my wife's 1100LT-20 (shorten stock, also) once I felt he was responsible enough to have a second shot. The key to all these guns is getting the pull to fit the child correctly. If your son is strong enough to handle the weight of 1187, you may want to give it some serious consideration or keep it in mind down the road.
 

Duck Assassin

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Thanks Mike, he is only 60 pounds, He is so skinny he would of made a good extra in the movie Schindler's List. I have an Rem 1100 26" Barrell and it is too heavy for him. There is a Greenwing Event where he should be able to try some shotguns.
9th Annual Green Wing Outdoor Extravaganza
 

Caine

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Tray to gett info on the franchi black magick s.auto 20g its light and fun to shoote. and the Yildiz profesjonal auto but in 12g it`s light but long..
 

SoCalTed

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DuckAssassin -

I purchased one of the H&R single shots for many of the same reasons mentioned here. Small stock, single shot, lightweight.

Both kids (10 & 12) want to shoot, but the anticipated kick makes them hesitate. My son tried QALHNTR's daughters AL391 at the JHP shoot @ triple B's. Although better - the anticipation of the kisk is still on his mind (he's 10)

For the dove opener, I created a pad from an old mouse pad that had a gel insert. It worked great, since i could not find a recoil pad to fit his small stock. I used a yellow dishwashing glove, cut the fingers off and glued it to the pad. It then slipped over the stock snuggly. After a day in the field, the heat actually melted the hot glue! But they were both about done any with the heat and all.

I am actually thinking of just attaching the pad to the inside of his vest. It will help him to remember where to shoulder the gun and give both of them a little more confidence.

I'd show you pictures, but it really was ugly!!
 

tnbowhunter

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Duck Assassin,

My first shotgun was a Winchester 110 youth model 20ga. It came with either a ventilated rib or just a bead sight. I got the gun when I was 11. For a beginner, this gun is very good. It is relatively light, and is a pump shotgun. I think that they have changed the model number on it to a 120 or 210. I an not quite sure. For a beginner, this is a fine gun. My best friends nephew has the newer model, and has shot it for the last two years, and loves it. Best of luck in finding one that will fit him. Maybe he will like it enough to continue to use it. I still use mine for dove hunting, because it is short, light, and most of all fun to shoot.
Again, best of luck, and just keep it fun for him.
 

songdog

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If you go with the Remington 1100 in 20 ga you can get it with a 23" barrel which seems to make a big difference (I've got one).

If you can combine:

20ga gas operated semi-auto

hearing protection (amazing how much it reduces recoil... or so it seems)

slightly lighter hand loads

shorter butt stock that fits the shooter

possibly even a mercury recoil reducer in the stock...

...you'll be amazed at what it feels like to shoot that gun. Substantially different than full house loads. If you're willing to keep the shots to the less thatn 20 yard "feet down" shots, check out the 20ga reloading info in the reloading section.
 

Jayboid

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This is my first post to this fine looking site. I have the pleasure of many youth out to our little ranch. Often I do teach kids to shoot, sometimes for the first time. Recoil is a foggy notion to youth, with many rumors circulating.

My son, now 14 is slender and slightly above average ht. He shoots any gun I own, including 3" Hevi-Shot 12g without much concern about recoil. Oddly enough, when we first began shotgunning, my old Mod. 12 20g he claimed "kicked". This was around age 11. That Christmas I debated on a hunting shotgun for him, a 20 or 12? Ended up getting him his own Rem. 870 All Weather in 12. Also picked up a cheap hunting vest with a tiny bit of padding, most likely a mental crutch for I don’t think it does much. We shot nothing but target PMC loads through this, and to this day he claims the 12 has less recoil than the 20. ????

Getting him through the early stage of shotgunning was helped by the fact he had his own "big boy" shotgun. Another trick I used was to make sure he new the loads were PMC Target, and I think they had blue hulls then. I noticed another poster mentioned good hearing protection helps too. Also shooting at clays keeps the mind off recoil too.

Scott Morgan Kansas
 

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