60 bucks for 2 bows at Estate Sale

Bowhunter_619

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Hey guys and gals,

I recently attended an estate sale with the wife and her friends; wife stumbled upon 2 recurves; the first was a Bear Kodiak that read BD 611, 60", 50lb. The only thing I can't figure out is the BD 611 number, any ideas?

The second bow is a Ben Pearson Cougar 7050 that is 62", 45lbs with a 28" draw...

Did we get a good deal?

disclaimer: I have been hunting with compound bows since I was 15 and had a true interest in traditional archery so I'm excited. Feel free to offer advice on strings needed and your opinion on arrows and setup. Thanks in advance JHO.IMG_0630[1].jpgIMG_0629[1].jpgIMG_0624[1].jpgIMG_0627[1].jpgIMG_0626[1].jpg
 

solus

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I would offer to take one off your hands but they are both left handed bows and I cant shoot left handed.. good find though seems like a deal as long as there is no cracks on the wood
 

Grey Taylor

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Those look like right hand bows to me. Sometimes the perspective is tricky when photographing recurves.
That XX45# means the bow weight is two pounds less than 45. That's a 43# bow. If the X's were on the other side you'd add a pound for each X.
If the limbs are straight then you got a hell of a good deal.
For strings get a Dacron string (B-50, B-55, or B-500) from someone who knows vintage bows. Using a fast flight-type string could harm the bow. I can highly recommend Chad at Champion Custom Bowstrings, http://www.recurves.com/bowstrings.html
You can use either a Flemish string or an endless string. Chad can explain the difference if you aren't familiar with them.

Good score!

Guy
 

Grey Taylor

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Oh, yeah...
For arrows you can use carbon, aluminum, or wood. They'll all work well if they are properly chosen for the bow. I'd be happy to help with wood if you go that route but I don't make aluminum or carbon arrows.

Guy
 

BelchFire

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They sure look right handed to me.....
 

solus

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Maybe you guys see it better than me but it look like the arrow rest area was on the right side of the bow
 

Grey Taylor

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This may make it easier...

IMG_0624[1].jpg

The recurve tips are pointing away from the camera, we're looking at the belly of the bows. Arrow shelf is on the left side.

Guy
 

Bowhunter_619

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They are both right handed bows.

@Guy, thanks for the info; I will definately get a hold of Chad for my strings. Are there any advantages to using carbon, aluminium or wood arrows for hunting purposes?
 

Grey Taylor

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Bowhunter, it can depend upon who you talk to.
Some of us maintain that wood is the only true/proper/correct arrow material. A well made wood arrow will perform well and be something you're proud to show off and to shoot.
Aluminum is probably falling by the wayside but their big disadvantage is that once bent it's difficult to get them straight again.
Carbon are tough but expensive. They do have great flexibility for weight loading to get extreme FOC if you want to go that direction. Carbon arrows work well but they will never be beautiful.
Before someone starts waving their arms and jumping up and down... yes, I am biased, I make and shoot wood arrows.

Guy
 

THE ROMAN ARCHER

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Bowhunter-619 u and your wife got a great deal, i buy, sell and collect recurves mostly Bear Bows, Grey T. is correct they are both right handed bows u hold with the left and pull with your right. I would say your Kodiak Hunter was a 1966. the leather grip on your kodiak was added after purchase i would beleive. the leather grip versions of K.H. where maid until 1960 and those versions had aluminum flush coins and yours looks like the brass version they only maid between 1963-70, the flush coin versions where maid only 1966-77 for the Kodiak Hunters.

Grey taylors advise on the type of strings to use is is the way to go not fast flights. and G.T. is also correct on what the xx45 means.

your Kodiak bow length is 60" so i would suggest a 56" string length with 16 strands.


i would date the Ben Person Cougar around 1967, and with the 62" bow length i would recomend a 58" string length should do.

as for the bows value by looking at the few photos u have of the bows u can get at least $150 no problem from the right buyer or collector for the kodiak hunter, the kodiak hunters are the most popular and saught after out of all the bear bow models especially the late 50's and early 60 models.

i just bought another 1972 Kodiak Hunter with greenwood and white pearl on the front grip i am going to refurbish and post soon when its complete.

the Ben Person looks real clean and u could get between $100.-$150. no problem for it.


as far as arrow shaft choice if u want to be hard core trad then u would want to roll with woodies which are awesome.

as far as aluminums my personal opinion i dont waste my time with them anymore they turn into scrap metal when u miss and hit somthing hard, my self i shoot both wood and carbon shafts depending on what game animal i pursue.
i use carbon with feathers and 150 gr. magnus broadheads for wild pigs myself.
my self i shoot compounds and recurves and i enjoy both, but it wont be too much longer before i just stick with trad and put the compounds in storage, i really enjoy the simplicity of shooting a recurve instinctivley and u can hunt all day with a recurve that doesnt even weigh 3 pounds and never get tired.

hope this helps, u need anymore info hit me up, have a great day!......tra
 

Wino

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Great find. I sold my bear kodiak hunter last year for $160.
 

Bowhunter_619

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G.T. and TRA thanks for the great info. I am looking forward to shooting traditional for the first time.
 

Grey Taylor

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You'll love it.
I remember when I took the training wheels off my first bike. Man, it was great! Now it felt lively, it cornered better, it handled easier. It wasn't like riding an anvil any more... now it was a real bike!
The bow is similar :smiley-mouse:

Let us know when you're ready for some trad only 3D shoots. There are some good ones within easy reach of socal and they're an absolute blast to participate in.

Guy
 

Arrowhead

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That's not a Kodiak Hunter. It's a Kodiak. Often refered to as a 59 Kodiak as that's the year it was introduced. Be real careful with that bow. I would estimate a value of $500 or more.

Go to the www.beararcheryproducts.com and look at the traditional bows. That "59" Kodiak we re-introduced this year and retails for $679.

After the Bear Take down bow that is the most sought after models. Great find. I'd date that bow a 59 or 60 as year made.

Great find. You can search 59 kodiak and find some trad forums that talk about that bow.

Very nice.
 

Arrowhead

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Ooop's I forgot to point out the fact that someone drilled holes and added the sight decreases the value of any collectible bow.

Still a great bow though.
 


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