9mm Evanix Rainstorm Bullpup Review

Bullfrog 31581

Well-known member
Here is my running review of my 9mm Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup. I bought this gun refurbished for $760 (it retails for $1000). Out of the box its advertised to shoot a 81 grain pellet at or around 800-820 feet per second for a couple of shots and then velocities will drop fast for subsequent shots. I have read about how some airgun smiths have increased performance of their gun drastically by making modifications to the valve and air flow ports similarly to what I did to my .25 Benjamin Marauder. The gun has a seven shot magazine that is operated with a side cocking lever. Every time the lever is pulled the 7 shot magazine (which is a rotary type mag) will rotate and when the lever is pushed forward it will push a pellet or bullet into the breech, ready to fire. The gun does not come with any suppression like the Marauder does. The gun does have a shroud over the barrel but it only has a couple of inches of room to take the blast from the end of the barrel. Basically the shroud just takes the harshest part of the bark out of the shot but its still loud. Its a little quieter than a standard .22LR round. The shroud end cap is threaded so you can remove it and add a suppressor if you want.

First, the gun had several problems off the bat. The air flow ports (called the transfer ports) were misaligned from the factory, meaning they were not drilled in line with each other. This would cause the gun to lose power and waist air when it shoots. I fixed this problem by dremmeling out the ports until they lined up. I also expanded the ports to a larger size to accommodate more air flow. I did the same to the air valve's ports. I also removed the valve's return spring which was blocking the flow of air. Second, I had to replace the cocking lever's pin that was broken inside the gun. The broken pin had the effect of either stopping the gun from cocking or causing it to misfire during the cocking procedure. I don't have the machining skills to make the pin but an airgun smith made one for me so again, that problem was solved. The third problem was the trigger. It was so heavy that I had to brace the gun downward to keep the gun on target as I squeezed the trigger. I fixed this by replacing the sear spring with a lighter spring and filing and polishing some of the point of contact parts within the trigger assembly. This greatly lightened and smoothed out the trigger. Finally, the picatinny rail was not sized correctly and allowed for play with quick detach-type mounts. All I could do about it was use mounting options that allow me to tighten the scope down extra firm. Quick detachment mounts are not an option, at least with this gun (notice that I was warned about this when I bought the gun refurbished and I think it was for this reason the gun was returned. It may be that the gun from the factory sports a standard sized rail and mine is a fluke).

So with the bad traits of the gun fixed with a little elbow grease, the gun's power potential has now increased by 100fps over the factory specs and my shot count has increased. I can now get several shots from the 940fps to 950fps with the same 81 grain pellet on a fill pressure from 3000psi to 2300psi. With heavier bullets instead of pellets this gun now has enough power to kill a deer with a double lung shot. It is also very accurate with the 81 grain JSB pellets that I'm using. I added a suppressor made by Neil Clague, who is famous in airgun circles for his suppressors. This suppressor makes the gun extremely quiet.

Here is the gun tricked out with my Clague suppressor and a Pulsar N550 night vision scope. Its giving me one hole groups at 50 yards if I do my part. She's ready to hunt. Stay tuned as I hope to get a successful hunt on video in the next few nights:



Here's what the pellets look like compared to standard .177 and .25 pellets:

 

quaildeath

Well-known member
Nice. So you don't shoot feral cats in Florida. They are more damaging to the flora and fauna than most native predators.
They kill everything indiscriminately and half the time for sport.
 

Bullfrog 31581

Well-known member
Nice. So you don't shoot feral cats in Florida. They are more damaging to the flora and fauna than most native predators.
They kill everything indiscriminately and half the time for sport.
I agree, they do lots of damage to native wildlife. If I did shoot them however, I wouldn't be at liberty to talk about it and I wouldn't film it. :pull-shades: The law is fuzzy as to whether true ferals can be killed or not. Most feral animals aren't protected in Florida, but there's are argument to be made that domestic cats don't fall under the state wildlife agency's jurisdiction. There was a controversy here a while ago when the state wildlife agency hinted at culling feral cats. It caused such an outcry that they backed away from the idea.
 
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Bullfrog 31581

Well-known member
It did not that I'm aware of, but there's places like that all over with resident populations of semi-feral cats. In random parks or around public buildings you'll see random bowls of cat food where local organizations of cat lovers feed and tend the wild cats. It created a problem in the downtown of my local small city where the do gooders were feeding the cats around the courthouse and the central square and rabies broke out.

Out on this 20 acre farm where I filmed this varmit hunt I know of three ferals that live on the farm and I suspect there's several more with overlapping territories on the surrounding farms.
 

Bullfrog 31581

Well-known member
I ended up selling this gun a couple of months ago. Every 2-3 weeks of heavy shooting caused another factory component to break. I finally got the gun rebuilt to a point that there were no flimsy factory parts left to break, but by that point I was tired of the gun.

My final verdict:
Positives:
- It shoots 81 grain JSB pellets very accurately.
- It responds well to modifications.
- Its capable to killing deer and hog-sized game with double lung shots out to 60 yards and complete pass-thrus.
- It is reasonably quiet when an aftermarket suppressor is added.

Negatives:
- The factory quality control is poor. Many components had to be rebuilt and modifications had to be made to correct factory errors. The required fixes are beyond the skills of most casual users.
- The factory trigger is terribly hard.
- The barrel only likes 81 grain JSB pellets, which are so hard that they do not expand even when hitting bone. This is acceptable on large game, but for small game like coons the non-expanding pellet punches thru too clean without imparting its energy. Think what happens when you shoot a coon with a .270 Win, pretty much the same thing. Too much gun for too soft of a target and kills are not as clean as they ought to be.

I overall recommend passing on this gun and this brand (Evanix).

I have a new .30 gun on the way from a pair of American airgun smiths who hand-machine and build their guns. Look for the review in the days to come.
 


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