a camera only 1.75 wide?

californiacoyotes

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anybody know of a camera that is 1.75 (1 3/4)thick or less? i have some rectangle, thin wall (.125) aluminum material that i thought about using some of for a housing for a cam. i also have the good dense black foam that is 2.00 in. thick. i can cut the foam easy enough with a jig saw so i am not too worried about that being too thick. it's just the camera that appears to be a problem. i measured the canon AF i have and it is just under 2.00 inches but too thick to fit into the material i have. also how about a flush mounted sensor? is this a special motion sensor or does it just sit inside the housing for the cam? i know i said i wasn't going to tackle a home brew for a couple months but the more i think about it , well you guys probably know! LOL

cc
 

coyotebandit

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The D-370 is less than 1.75" thick, if you wanted to go digital. I think the Snappt QT might be also, but you might want to double check.


(Edited by coyotebandit at 8:02 am on July 17, 2002)
 

Hill Hopper

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A Fuji date 60 AF would be below 1-3/4" tk.. It would require a refresh, but thats not a problem if you use Brian's ot Hameltoe's boards. These cam's do draw a fair amount of power, so if you use one, I would recommend you disconnect the LED by the viewfinder to help. The counter reset problems in the earlier models has been corrected.
 

Archilochus

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Hi CC,
If you use the Fuji AF60 - have the 'refresh' be longer than the ~7 minutes used for the Owl cams.  Even with the green LED disconnected, these cams will use up the batts fast with a short 'refresh' cycle.  Try something like 30 to 45 minutes.  Of course, if the model has been updated, that info might not apply any more! (my Fuji AF60s were purchased when the model was first introduced).

Another super-small cam is the Canon Elph LT.  I got one of these into a "micro-cam" that measures 3x3x5 inches!

Archilochus
 

californiacoyotes

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arch
is that the elph LT APS? can you tell me exactly what i would need to build a cam using this elph?

also(on ebay) the film is described as being "dropped in" does that mean it is 35mm?

cc

(Edited by californiacoyotes at 10:57 am on July 17, 2002)
 

Archilochus

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Hi CC,
The cam is APS - 24mm film with 'panoramic' option (uses 2 or 3 frames)  The film has no "tail" hanging out like normal 35mm film.  You just "drop" the film cartridge in the cam, and the cam does all the film handling.  Time / date /exposure info on a magnetic strip with option to print on film too.

My older Elph LT needs a refresh to keep the cam awake at around 2 or more hours.  Brian has a newer version Elph LT and they DO NOT need a refresh.  Built-in flash is fairly weak - but the cam takes good pics.

The micro-cam I built with the Elph LT took quite a bit of work to get it all in the tiny box.  You'd want to use one of the "mirror optics" from ****** (search this forum on that subject) for the PIR sensor. Unless you make your own surface mount PC boards, you'll have to mount the PIR element in the mirror optics separate from the original sensor board.  Use one of Brians cam controller chips.  Mount the circuitry behind the camera with either a single 9 volt batt or 4x"AAA"s.  Use the  3-wire shutter control for this cam (no problem with Brians controllers).  To keep everything small and low-power, use opto-couplers instead of relays.

If you go with a somewhat larger box, you can leave the original PIR sensor & lens intact.  Then the cam is just wired up like any of the others (using 3-wires).  Somewhere in my pile of clutter I have some pics of how to wire this cam - it's fairly easy. I'll post 'em if anyone is interested.

Oh yeah, the box I used is a ... er,... um... "engineering sample" from Vynckier - it's a NEMA 4x electrical enclosure - very nice!

Archilochus
 

californiacoyotes

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arch
i'm definately interested in see you pictures! this being my first home i built i'll probably go the easier route and use a larger enclosure. gotta keep my first one simple. thanks!


cc
 

Archilochus

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Well.... that was easy!  Looks like I had made up a little web-page for this cam already - and then went and forgot about it! Duhhh....

Here's the link:
http://archilochus.netfirms.com/elphlt.html

Have Fun!,
Archilochus

<<<<EDIT>>>>
Just a note on the shutter wiring - The wire colors "black, green, and white" refer to the 3 wires connected to the square silver micro-switch (which is under the shutter button).
<<<<END EDIT>>>>

(Edited by Archilochus at 2:40 pm on July 17, 2002)
 

californiacoyotes

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arch
will i still need everything list a few post above if i go with a larger box, say 5x8x2 wide? and how can i tell if i will need a refresh or not?

cc
 

Archilochus

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Hi CC,
If you use the larger box, you can just modify your PIR sensor according to Jesses instructions like with any other cam (but use the "3-wire" setup).
The need for a 'refresh' can be determined by letting the cam sit idle - in the case of the Elph LT - let it sit for 5 hours.  After that time, press the shutter button - if the cam flashed or took a pic - no refresh is needed!  You can ask the place you might buy one from to try it out before you buy it.
The same test will work with other cams - but the time period will vary.

Archilochus
 
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