Adding Babbit to Alloy

472x1A/B

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Has anyone ever used babbit to add to their lead pot to increase boolit hardness or to increase solder content? I have acquired 4 bars of babbit and would like to know how much to add to my pot when casting boolits. The bars are 89% solder, 7 1/2% antimony, and 3 1/2% silver. Each bar is 10 lbs.. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.:wavin hello:
 

myfriendis410

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If you increase the tin content of your alloy above about 5% you run the risk of creating solder. The result is a harder bullet, but also one that transfers it's surface to the barrel of your gun something awful. Tin is present in the bullet alloy to "wet" the alloy to the mold, making a crisper finished bullet with good sharp edges, and to provide some hardening of the finished bullet. The ideal mix (assuming rifle bullets) would be wheel weights with about 2% tin, cast and then frozen for 48 hours to harden. IMO
 

472x1A/B

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Well after asking, and asking, and asking I caved in and went out to the college to confer with a metallurgist about my problem of how much babbit material to add to my lead pot. Explaining about all of the componets the professor did some of his professor stuff and said to me like he already knew the answer befor I walked in, well you have to add 1.89% of babbit. Ok, so how much would that be in weight terms? ( Huh, smart_ _ _ ) Oh, you'ed have to measure out 1.56 oz. for each 10lbs. of lead. So I learned that babbit has ALOT of tin in it. Humm. I did ask him about freezing lead/lead bullets to make it/them harder. He looked at me like I was an alien from space and said he's never heard of that one befor.
 

myfriendis410

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Wheel weights contain about 2% arsenic. It is present as a hardening agent for the wheel weights and is obviously a good choice for a hard cast rifle bullet. Your "professor" may be a metallurgist, but maybe he ought to go out in the real world once in a while and see how this stuff really works. Cast your bullets with wheel weights and 2% tin, then freeze for 48 hours; it will double the hardness.
 


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