Alternative Fuel Sources

Marty

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Since the fuel and automotive industries do not support electrification, will they kill the biodiesel programs as well?

From the JatrophaBioDiesel.com webpage:
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE </div>
Great Day for Biofuels! Russia Ratifies Kyoto Protocol Treaty
Thursday November 11, 9:30 am ET

BAKERSFIELD, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Nov. 11, 2004--American Biofuels (ABF), which is 35% owned by Green Star Products, Inc. (OTC: GSPI - News), made the following announcement:

After six years of international negotiations the Kyoto Treaty finally received enough signatures from participating countries to make that treaty binding on all signatures. Russia was the last to sign giving the treaty its required 55% of the nations that contribute to global warming gases.

This is a major victory for alternative fuels like biodiesel and ethanol, which reduce CO2 emissions.

On Nov. 5, 2004 Reuters released the following information:

"President Vladimir Putin gave his seal of approval for Russia's crucial backing of the Kyoto Protocol, clearing the way for the U.N. environment pact aimed at curbing global warming to come into force early next year."

"The Kremlin said Putin signed a parliament bill late on Thursday confirming Russia's ratification of the protocol. Both chambers of Russia's parliament approved ratification of the pact last month after Putin pointed the way."

The Wall Street Journal on October 22, 2004, in an article also stated, "The treaty is meant to slow the rapidly accelerating release into the atmosphere of so-called greenhouse gases, chiefly carbon dioxide. CO2, produced by the burning of fossil fuels such as oil and coal, forms an atmospheric layer that reflects the sun's heat back toward Earth, heating the planet in a process known as the greenhouse effect, or global warming."

Joseph LaStella, president on GSPI, stated, "The use of biodiesel reduces CO2 emissions by 78% and that a study done by the National Biodiesel Board indicates that biodiesel is the lowest cost alternative to reduce exhaust emissions from diesel engines, which includes global warming gases."

These past few weeks have been great news for the planet Earth, the Kyoto Treaty was ratified and President Bush signed HR 4520 in law, which provides both biodiesel and ethanol an excise tax refund. Both these events will greatly increase biodiesel and ethanol production in the US and worldwide.

An article printed in Biodiesel Magazine (Oct.-Nov. 2004) states: "India wants to launch a major biodiesel effort, but they have not been able to lock in on a consistent source."

The article further states, "The only real hope (for India) today lies is non-edible tree oils, such as jatropha and pogomia. These oil trees are hardy plants that require minimum water and can grow in nearly all soil types...Plants like jatropha, which produce non-edible oil seeds, can grow very well in varied regions of India." These oil trees have only one hitch; it takes three to five years to produce full yields.

Joseph LaStella stated, "India is only one part of a huge market in a world that suddenly realizes that they may have to import alternative fuels while gearing up their own production of alternative fuels through technology transfers."

The Biodiesel Magazine article also states, "California-based American Biofuels...recently announced that it had shipped a container load of U.S.-produced biodiesel to Asia. The shipment is believed to be the largest order of biodiesel ever shipped from the United States to Asia. The company shipped approximately 6,000 gallons of biodiesel packaged in over 100 barrels. The company called the shipment - 'a major step in opening Asian markets to U.S.- produced biodiesel and biodiesel technology.'"

Presently, almost every country is scrambling to increase their production of biofuels to wean off the high cost and instability of crude oil and become more energy independent.

American Biofuels is not only planning its expansion in the US but also its exports abroad and to construct plants on a joint venture basis in several foreign countries, which have contacted American Biofuels.

Green Star Products, Inc. is an environmentally friendly company dedicated to creating innovative cost-effective products to improve the quality of life and clean up the environment. GSPI is involved in the production of renewable clean-burning biodiesel and other products including lubricants, additives and devices that reduce emissions and improve fuel economy in vehicles, machinery and power plants. For more information, see GSPI's Web site at http://www.GreenStarUSA.com or call Investor Relations at 619-864-4010, or fax 619-789-4743, or email info@GreenStarUSA.com. Information about trading prices and volume can be obtained at several Internet sites including http://www.bloomberg.com and http://www.bigcharts.com under the ticker symbol "GSPI."[/b]
 



ETC2NA

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What was their stock symbol? Just curious...
 

beastslayer

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Marty - Thanks for sharing. There is enough reason for optimism.

Nice move ETC2NA. These companies look like winners.
 

ETC2NA

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GSPI was down 4.44% to 0.086 a share. All the markets are losing today though.
 

PHOnos

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Marty @ Aug 3 2006, 09:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
An article printed in Biodiesel Magazine (Oct.-Nov. 2004) states: "India wants to launch a major biodiesel effort, but they have not been able to lock in on a consistent source."

The article further states, "The only real hope (for India) today lies is non-edible tree oils, such as jatropha and pogomia. These oil trees are hardy plants that require minimum water and can grow in nearly all soil types...Plants like jatropha, which produce non-edible oil seeds, can grow very well in varied regions of India." These oil trees have only one hitch; it takes three to five years to produce full yields.[/b]
This stuff sounds similar to some of the oily plants found the national forest chaparral here in SoCal. (This is why it burns so good, of course).

Maybe instead of controlled burns of areas where the chaparral gets too heavy, it could be harvested like trees except for its fuel (biodiesel ?) value rather than construction material value.

Other than the probems of harvesting on the steep slopes, am I crazy?
 

beastslayer

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Phonos - You are not crazy and Foo, it funny, but it is scientifically valid but NIMBY. As Einstein himself says that all matter are convertible into energy. The issue really if it is not negative output. Meaning that energy usage (to convert it into usable energy) should be less than energy output.
 

Marty

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Isn't it the Nepalese who burn a mixture of peat and dung? Or, was it just dung? Anyway...
 

PHOnos

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There is a relatively small generating unit down in the Imperial Valley that uses the feed lots down there for its source of fuel. Yes, it burns fertilizer. It may be operating now or it may be shut down.

The Plant at Mecca (Colmac) burns green waste but I think they started adding a small amount of something (coal, tires ?) to it to increase the heat value of the fuel.

L.A. Co Sanitation District had a big project (Lancer, I think ?) at the Hyperion Plant at El Segundo to process the sewage sludge and make fuel out of it for a generation operation. Used something calle the Carver-Greenfield process. They never could get it to work right and I think it's all gone now.
 


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