Animal Cruelty Measure Is Really An Anti-Hog-Farm Measure

gwhunter69

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Animal Cruelty Measure Is Really An Anti-Hog-Farm Measure
By Susan Jones
CNSNews.com Morning Editor
August 06, 2002

(CNSNews.com) - A Florida ballot measure seeking to prevent animal cruelty is also an effort to drive corporate hog farms out of Florida.

The ballot measure, recently certified by the state of Florida, would stop the practice of confining pregnant pigs in "gestation cages."

Animal activists launched a petition drive to get the measure on the November ballot after the state legislature refused to consider a bill outlawing gestation crates.

The crates are two-by-seven foot metal cages in which breeding sows may spend up to three years of their lives. The cage or crate system was developed to make pork production cheaper and more efficient. Confining animals requires less feed, less labor, and less space.

"Pigs in gestation crates suffer from a range of physical and psychological problems," said Wayne Pacelle, a senior vice president of The Humane Society of the United States.

"It's no surprise that packing animals in small metal cages for months at a time leads to enormous suffering and emotional frustration. Even animals used in an agricultural setting deserve basic humane treatment," he said in a press release.

The Florida ballot initiative does not prevent confinement of pregnant sows when it's necessary for veterinary purposes or during the period just prior to birthing. It would give pig farmers six years to phase out the routine use of gestation crates.

In a statement announcing that the Florida Animal Cruelty Act will appear on the November ballot, two animal activists indicated this is an anti-corporate measure.

Nanci Alexander, founder of the Animal Rights Foundation of Florida, one of the groups that sponsored the ballot initiative, said, "We have the solid support of concerned Floridians who believe that the use of gestation crates is cruel and unnecessary. They look forward to voting in November to prevent industrial hog factories from taking root here."

Mike Markarian, executive vice president of The Fund for Animals, echoed Alexander's line of thinking.

"Keeping highly intelligent, social animals confined in such intense and deprived conditions for the majority of their lives leads to joint and hip disorders, muscle atrophy, repetitive biting of the metal bars, head waving, floor pawing and thrashing around," Markarian said.

"This measure sends a signal to corporate factory farms that they are not welcome in Florida."

Environmental activists have long complained about hog farms, particularly the large, corporate-owned farms, citing foul odors and water pollution from hog waste.
 

Speckmisser

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Hey GW,

I know you're the mod on this forum, so please don't take this wrong... but wouldn't this kinda thing be more appropriate in the Hot Topics area?  Last time I was on a hog farm, the only thing natural was the stench.

Respectfully submitted... Speckmisser
 

gwhunter69

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Yeah, i meant to put it there too...but I got distacted by work...go figure and thanks for the reminder...:smile-big-blue:
 

gwhunter69

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Animal Cruelty Measure Is Really An Anti-Hog-Farm Measure
By Susan Jones
CNSNews.com Morning Editor
August 06, 2002

(CNSNews.com) - A Florida ballot measure seeking to prevent animal cruelty is also an effort to drive corporate hog farms out of Florida.

The ballot measure, recently certified by the state of Florida, would stop the practice of confining pregnant pigs in "gestation cages."

Animal activists launched a petition drive to get the measure on the November ballot after the state legislature refused to consider a bill outlawing gestation crates.

The crates are two-by-seven foot metal cages in which breeding sows may spend up to three years of their lives. The cage or crate system was developed to make pork production cheaper and more efficient. Confining animals requires less feed, less labor, and less space.

"Pigs in gestation crates suffer from a range of physical and psychological problems," said Wayne Pacelle, a senior vice president of The Humane Society of the United States.

"It's no surprise that packing animals in small metal cages for months at a time leads to enormous suffering and emotional frustration. Even animals used in an agricultural setting deserve basic humane treatment," he said in a press release.

The Florida ballot initiative does not prevent confinement of pregnant sows when it's necessary for veterinary purposes or during the period just prior to birthing. It would give pig farmers six years to phase out the routine use of gestation crates.

In a statement announcing that the Florida Animal Cruelty Act will appear on the November ballot, two animal activists indicated this is an anti-corporate measure.

Nanci Alexander, founder of the Animal Rights Foundation of Florida, one of the groups that sponsored the ballot initiative, said, "We have the solid support of concerned Floridians who believe that the use of gestation crates is cruel and unnecessary. They look forward to voting in November to prevent industrial hog factories from taking root here."

Mike Markarian, executive vice president of The Fund for Animals, echoed Alexander's line of thinking.

"Keeping highly intelligent, social animals confined in such intense and deprived conditions for the majority of their lives leads to joint and hip disorders, muscle atrophy, repetitive biting of the metal bars, head waving, floor pawing and thrashing around," Markarian said.

"This measure sends a signal to corporate factory farms that they are not welcome in Florida."

Environmental activists have long complained about hog farms, particularly the large, corporate-owned farms, citing foul odors and water pollution from hog waste.
 

Mojave

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I'm kind of on the fence on this one, as we raise 2 pigs for slaughter each year, and they do act almost smart. Of course, when you are dealing with only 2 or 3, it's much easier to put them in a roomy pen, than if you had hundreds. The reason I felt I had to comment though, was the statements about "psychological problems" and "emotional frustration" in the pigs. I can almost picture the Humane Society Pig Psychologist in his office, with his "patient" lying on the couch and oinking about his difficult childhood.
 
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