Any good spots for Coyotes

Corndog

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Looking for a good location and method for taking yotes.  Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

thanks.  
 

Hook

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Corndog, there are a lot of good places out there by you, just head out of town and in the low land area and washes. A good method is to pick a spot that you have a good shooting lanes and use a mouth call or a electronic caller and start calling.
Try a jackrabbit and cottontail call. I have even used a woodpecker call that works well too.
Keep your eyes open and be ready to shoot, because they come in fast. If you dont see anything in about 3-5 minutes of calling, move you stand about 1/2-1 mile and try again.

Good luck and let me know how you do.
 

spectr17

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Corndog,

Since you hang around them military types, see if you can get your hands on a free used  electronic  siren like the type used on a fire engine or ambulance. Flightline Crash/rescue might have some laying around that can be schmoozed if you're good.

The fastest way to check for yotes in large areas  is pull up and hit the siren. Like all dogs, yotes love to howl at sirens. Quick check marks on your maps and you now have locations dialed in to hit with the calls or you can jsut head out after making first contact.

Just don't drive around playing Barney Fife with the siren, cops don't have much of a sense of humor for imposters.
 
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Hello spectrl17 i see in your bio. that your from missouri i am also from missouri  sikeston to be exact in the lower south/east of the state and have been here in so.cal for some time. about that siren i picked a electronic style siren for the security guys at work  this thing really wail's just push the button and let her fly but just a short burst like you said the law does'nt like it when you play wannabe. well i will talk at ya later    keith in long beach ca.  
 

Bill W

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Corndog,

I know there's a bunch out there near you.  Last January I was returning from a ski trip at Mammoth Mountain.  About one mile north of the Ridgrcrest turnoff (from Hwy 395) there were four coyotes crossing the road together.  

Although it's been five years or so, I've killed a number near randsburg, red mountain, California City, and Mojave.  As far as looking for places, I agree with Hook about low-lying wash areas.  There tends to be more greenery, prey, cover, and water in these areas so the coyotes are likely to be there already.  In hunting a likely  area like that I always start with a squeaker call very quitely just in case there happens to be a predator right around the next corner of the wash that didn't hear me sneak in to my spot.

One thing to keep in mind when hunting the desert though: Coyotes are most sucessful living on the edges of civilization.  There are almost always man made water and food sources in such places.  So whether it's ag. land, or a small town in the middle of nowhere, there are likely to be good numbers of coyotes nearby.  Pick a likely looking spot a mile or so from water/food sources and give it a shot.

Ideally you want to set up downwind or cross wind of heavy cover, foothills, or other likely den/daytime rest areas.  If you can get a set up like than and be within a coupe of miles of a small town or ag area, I can just about gaurantee that there are coyotes around.  

When you set up try and pick an area that will be difficult for the coyote to circle downwind on you.  I like to back up against a range of hills if possible so the coyote will have to climb and expose himself in order to circle. The base of hills are also nice because you can usually see a long ways out. But wherever you call from, remember that the number one factor is wind direction.

However you set up you will do much better on the sneaky ones if you take their tendency to circle into account when you set up .  If you don't take this issue into account, I am firmly convinced that you educate coyotes on the ins and outs of predator calling.

When you are picking a new spot to set up on, do it and plan your set up from 1/4 mile or more  with a pair of Binocs. Identify the lay of the terrain, where you'll probablly sit, etc through the glasses.  Ideally, you want to quietly sneak in, walking directly to your spot, sit down, wait 10-15 min, and then get started.  If you are switching spots or milling around laying down scent over an area, you drasticly reduce your chances on the smarter ones.

I have to strongly disagree with Hook about only waiting 3-5 minutes.  I don't think this is anywhere near long enough.  While I have certainly had a lot of coyotes come charging in within that time frame, I have had just as many or more take 15 minutes.   Sometimes they run in, sometimes they sneak in.  A lot of that depends on if they have been hunted before.  I've watched coyotes respond to my call, stop at four hundred yards, and lay down in the shade for five minutes to stop and see what's what before coming in. Some of those guys won't come in.  Sometimes the reluctant ones can be coaxed by using the squeaker call. (Imagine the rabbit near death with barely enough strength to put out a couple of squeaks.) Those reluctant coyotes have almost certainly been shot at IMO.

I generally will wait thirty minutes (45 if Bobcat hunting) on a stand calling every seven or eight minutes (and calling very briefly-3 bleats at a time. Although, the very first series of calls will be more- 15-20 quick bleats).  Every Bobcat I've called (about six or seven) has taken at least 20 minutes.  I've had coyotes take up to 30, although at twenty minutes the odds of one coming drops off pretty dramaticly in my opinion.

I also think that moving a mile between hunting spots is not enough (at least in open or desert country).  I think two miles is a better guide.

Just my opinions and you know what they say about opinions.

Bill
 


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