Batteries

TruShot

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I am just curious to see what ather people are using. I  have one cam right now with the RS PIR and I am using 2 AA for the camera (Polaroid 2400FF) and a standard 9v for the sensor.
I was wondering about using rechargable AA and 9v if they hold a charge very long. I guess I kind of hate throwing out 2 AA every week and a 9v every couple weeks. Especially when I get to the point where I've got 2, 3 or more cams running. The cost doesn't really bother me of havving to buy new batteries all the time I was just thinking of reducing the amount of them I'm throwing out.

Anyway what do you guys think?
Thanks.
 



Eagle Eye

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I'm using a Black & Decker VersaPak battery on all my cams now. They last about 3 months with my setup then I recharge. It powers the sensor and timer. Just wish I could figure a better way of hooking it up, I'm using small alligator clips

As far as AA batteries the rechargable ones that came with my digatal camera last forever, but when I have to replace them they will cost me $22 for four.
 

Bob R

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I am using a couple of the 6 volt Powersonic rechargeables in my cams.  I used the 6 volt batteries hooked in series, because I had some here at the house.  The ones that I build in the future will have 12 volt Powersonics in them.  They last about 4 months for me powering the MS20 sensor only.  The camera has 2 AA's in it, I change them about every 10 rolls of film.

 

bikehike

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I use the 9.6 volt RC battery with the MS20 sensor. They last a long time and recharge in a couple of hours.
 

homer

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I use a 12vdc battery for my ms-20 and a archy's battery adapter with two D-cells for my camera. I put the D-cells in over a month ago and there still going strong. Heres the link                                                                   http://www.geocities.com/archilochus57/
 

Possum

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Camera-aa alkalines
Sensor and JoeD. Timer-6volt alkaline
 
T

the hairless one

Guest
9.v akalines but I may eventually get rechargeables if I start going thru TOO many.

rick
 

markr

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I recently switched to four double A's after starting with the 9 volt setup. I now get about four weeks of battery life which is plenty.
 

Tinhorn

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Markr

what were u getting with the 9v battery (I assume u're using the RS PIR)

Tinhorn
 

TruShot

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Thanks for all the info so far. The 9.6V RC battery is one of the options I was thinking of. I like the idea of having two one at home charged and one in the cam so I can swap them out.

Eagle Eye, are you using just one Versapak batery or do you have them in a series? They are only 3.6V anrn't they?

(Edited by TruShot at 1:55 pm on Feb. 27, 2002)
 

jayber

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I was going through several used batteries last nite, measuring the voltage of each, and I was wondering at what level they should not be used/considered for use with my PIR.  Does anybody know at what minimum voltage level the MS20 starts to act erratic and  cause false triggers/pics?
 

Tinhorn

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If I remember right the MS20 becomes unstable at about 4.8 volts

BUT

the real problem with weak batteries is when the PIR gets triggered and trips the relay, the relay's current about kills the weak battery.  This is about like turning off the power to the PIR, when the relay releases, the battery volts shoot back up and trigger the PIR again, which pulls in the relay, etc,   creating a vicous cycle and ripping off the rest of the roll of film

About half the time, this is how I learn that the batteries are weak in my Movement Cam's.  The sad thing is, sometimes when I check the cam and see the film is all used up, I stick in a new roll and leave it out only to have the weak batteries do their thing and rip thru that roll 5 min's after I leave.......dumb dumb dumb

This is one reason the Opto's Archie and Brian use are so good, they don't pull near the current the Relay does so the batteries should last much, much longer......

You might want to invest in a battery tester from RS too, they test the batteries under load, a true test.  Just testing the battery voltage is not a good way, BTW.

Tinhorn
 

jayber

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Thanks for the info Tinhorn!  At least I know when not to use weaker batteries in the cams built with relays...
 

Brian

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Tinhorn is right.  Of course I know ya'll knew that.

The optos with the 10K resistor pulls 300uA combined so the load on the battery is hardly noticeable.

The chip and optos running at the same time pulls 1.3mA or there abouts.  I am not sure about the MS20 but the optos and chip should help your battery life tremedously.

Of course, Idle current of the MS20 is the real culprit.

I found a battery tester made my Moultrie at Wal-Mart on clearance sale for $3 dollars.  It works great. Might be a place to look.
 

SmoothBore

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Has anyone investigated why the standy current draw of the MS20 is so high?  Is it in the regulator, the comparators, the PIR itself?  Just curious as to whether other mods might be possible to reduce the standy current.  I have looked at it myself but a couple of electronics courses does not make an expert! :idea-litebulb-blue:
 

Tinhorn

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SmoothBore,

I'm pretty sure it's the Chip they use itself.  There is suspose to be a Pin for Pin compatable IC that uses way less current.  

I measured the MS20 current without the internal 5v reg once but it drew about the same  (I thought maybe it was the regulated circuit itself drawing all that current)

Someday I'm going to experiment wth the sensitivey of the MS20 and try to reduce it by adjusting the FeedBack resistor on one of the op amps too

Tinhorn
 

SmoothBore

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Thanks Tinhorn,

I was half suspecting that the quad opamp chip might be the culprit, since the designers would not have had to worry much about power consumption when it was sourced from AC.  Did you say you had a lead on a potential replacement chip?.  If I can find some time I might do some experimenting.
 

Archilochus

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Hi guys,
Make sure to check the data sheets thoroughly before selecting any replacements.  While any given quad op-amp IC might have the same pinout, that does not guarantee any other specs.  Get the sheets for the original part and compare all the specs to your potential replacement.

Archilochus
 

Tinhorn

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SmoothBore, Arch:

I thought I'd start a new post with the LM324 question so in the future it would be easier to find.  I'll name it "MS20 LM324 Question"

Tinhorn
 

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