Bear hunting question. How to avoid a sow with cubs.

Plain ol' Steve

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I will be deer hunting D7 along wit 8,999 other close friends during the archery season. I have a bear tag and wish to take a legal bear if an opportunity presents itself while I am hunting deer.

I want to be very careful about not taking a sow with cubs. Not only is it prohibited, it would be very upsetting to me if that were to happen. Soooo... Big question to you bear hunters is, when a bear has cubs is it pretty evident? My guess is that I just need to take a little care watching the bear's vicinity for cubs or perhaps its behavior.

Any pointers on identifying a bear with cubs? Are they often hidden? What measures do you take to avoid the mistake of taking a sow with cubs?


Thanks,
POS
 

Bankrunner

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I'm not a bear hunter but every time Iv'e seen a sow with cubs in the field they are within feet or yards of each other. Same thing with nature shows on TV.
 

Bubblehide

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POS, this is a very good question. Cubs are NOT always right with a sow. But, generally speaking, they are close by. But close can be a relative term. While deer hunting last year, (the story is in one of my posts), I saw a nice bear at about 400 yards. I watched the bear for likely 1/2 hour, in the open, and by all appearances, by herself. However, while she was in the open, she kept going back to a large oak tree about 50 yards away, and then back further into the open. My optics reveled that the bear was likely vocalizing while at the oak tree (could it have been cubs?). Well, long story short, I knew that there was a sow with 2 cubs in the area, and I really did not want to take a bear, where I was, as it would have been way beyond to much work. After that 1/2 hour, the 2 cubs emerged. My point here is that it is not always obvious.

But what do I do to prevent harvesting a sow with cubs, I scout the hell out of the area I plan to take a bear from; and, I know which bears are using the area. I know their individual tracks, and any distinguishing markings. Bears have a large territory, but they tend to use the same areas, here one night, and over there another... So I might not know exactly where they are, but I know where to go to find them, and if I sit on one spot, long enough, I know they will eventually show; the only question is if they will be there during legal harvesting hours.

Best of luck!
 

Common Sense

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I want to be very careful about not taking a sow with cubs. Not only is it prohibited, it would be very upsetting to me if that were to happen.
Only one way to be sure you don't shoot a wet bear; don't shoot any bear. That being said, don't worry about it. I am not saying you should knowingly shoot a bear with cubs; but it wouldn't be the end of the world if you unknowingly shot a bear with cubs in D7. It is not like there is a shortage of bears in D7. Maybe if there were a few less bears in the Sierra's, there would be a few more Bambi's.
 

Plain ol' Steve

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Only one way to be sure you don't shoot a wet bear; don't shoot any bear. That being said, don't worry about it. I am not saying you should knowingly shoot a bear with cubs; but it wouldn't be the end of the world if you unknowingly shot a bear with cubs in D7. It is not like there is a shortage of bears in D7. Maybe if there were a few less bears in the Sierra's, there would be a few more Bambi's.
I understand what you are saying, but it would absolutely destroy my enjoyment of the hunt if I were to take a bear and then discover a cub in the nearby brush bawling for its mother.
 

DFG_Bear

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Like Bubblehide mentioned, keep a visual on the bear for some time. Look for any vegetation moving behind a bear. Look for them returning to a particular spot where they're not evidently feeding. Watch for them repeatedly looking behind themselves. Listen for bawling that kind of resembles a bleating goat or sheep.
 

bcbear3

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Saw a big sow last week, only a glimpse of the cub for several minutes. It was bawling some. It was a second yr cub maybe in beginning of separation.
In the past I've seen them trying to parallel sow at a distance. Kicking the cub off May take some time..
 

Where's Bruce?

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If it has a long neck and big butt, pass it up and wait for a boar. Simple solution.
 


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