Big Game Preparation, Cooking and Sausage Making - Looking for a presenter for a seminar

Summitdog

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I am trying to organize a big game cooking/sausage making seminar in the Bay Area (probably in San Jose). I am looking for someone who has the experience and skillset to be a (or the) presenter for the seminar. Anyone out there willing?

Please feel free to contact me directly with availability,
Scotty
 

Schnitt

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Perhaps talk to someone that works at Los Gatos Meats, or their sister facility in Willow Glen?
Perhaps one of the other meat lockers like Freedom.
I do my own hog butchering and sausage, but I am certainly a novice.... I have just learned enough to know that it takes experience.
Most of the big game hunters I know that live in the bay area take their meat to one of the above places to have it done.
 

Captjgray

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Send a message to Hank Shaw. he is probably one of the best in our area for this type of event
 

Summitdog

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Do you happen to have his contact information? The email address I found online is invalid.

Thanks,
Scotty

Send a message to Hank Shaw. he is probably one of the best in our area for this type of event
 

Schnitt

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I wanted to share some information that I have collected on sausage making:
I make wild pig sausage and usually mix up my own seasoning for it. I am still a novice, but would like to use this thread to share some of my findings.
Casings: Collagen casings are easier to stuff than natural casings, but harder to hold together after twisting the links and also tend to explode when cooking. Poke a lot of holes. After playing with collagen, I have switched back to intestine casings.
Fat: I get pork fat from the butcher for free and have tried from 20-30% added fat. My sausage comes out crumbly after cooking, so I know I need to change something. It may be that I am actually adding too much fat, or that it is not very good fat, or that the meat is getting too warm during grinding and the fat is starting to render out. Work in progress.
Expert advice: I talked to a local wild game meat processing facility and they said that they add about 30% "50/50 Pork trim" to big game, and 40% of that same trim to duck since it is so lean. 50/50 pork trim is about 50% fat, so their wild game sausage is really 70% game meat, 15% pork, and 15% fat. They also said that it good to add "a little" water to help break down the meat protein. They suggest to spend a long time mixing the seasoning into the ground meat as this also helps break down the meat and improves texture.
Seasoning: I buy seasonings and also my my own. Most of the seasoning companies only sell wholesale, but companies like Legg's sells retail packages and they seem to be pretty good. If you make your own, one tricky part is to figure out how much salt. Most commercial sausage is under 0.8% salt, so you can use that as a reference when mixing.
Grinding: Get your meat really cold (even partially frozen) and also cool down your metal grinder parts in the fridge/freezer prior to grinding. This is to compensage for the heat that is generated when the grinder grinds the meat.
Hanging: After the sausage is stuffed, the pros then hang the sausage in a refrigerated room. I had not done that in the past, but found it is the dry the casing a bit and also let the meat set up. After letting sit in the fridge for a day, I found it is fine to cut the links apart without risk of the sausage ozzing out the end. I have done them on a sheet, but I also plan to experiment with wire racks to go in the fridge.
 


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