Big Island Report

doccherry

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2002
Messages
424
Reaction score
0
Finally my luck has turned around a bit. I've been hunting at the estate about 5 times since I last reported and got a small pig, maybe 80 or 100 pounds, last Tuesday. I shot it straight on, right in the chest below the neck. It's been dry as a bone and when I walk in the brush or the coffee trees, dry leaves sound like Corn Flakes beneath my sneakers and anything within a couple hundred yards takes off. I can hear the pigs more easily but they can hear me and they disappear. One evening, right at darkness, I was standing on a lava boulder above a small clearing surrounded by 6 foot high grass. A large black pig---probably the old boar---made its way through the grass and started feeding about 15 feet away. All I could see was patches of black here and there. I drew back my bow and held it, waiting for the boar to show himself. I could hear him breathing, he was so close. I felt certain I'd get a shot if I was patient. I held and held and got so tired that I slowly let down the string. The idler wheel made a "squeak" and the pig took off. The next day, after lubing the idler wheel, and at the same spot, I was sitting on the boulder and a sow silently appeared at the lower end of the clearing, 30 yards away. There were quite a few vines and stalks of grass between me and her so I was waiting for a clear shot. No clear shot presented itself so I decided to try to shoot through the obstructions. I shot and that arrow must have hit every piece of vegetation possible. It landed sideways at the sow's feet with a "clunk." She took off.

Saturday night we had 4 inches of rain in about 4 hours. I went up to the place yesterday evening [Sunday] and was able to walk around without making a sound. I hid in the coffee trees and within 10 minutes heard a "whoosh" and saw a large sow looking at me. She was in the brush so I didn't have a shot. Two small pigs, about 60 pounds or so, walked out. One stood broadside at 30 yards and stared. I took a shot but my arrow passed an inch over its back and I saw sparks where the broadhead hit lava. They all took off. My broadhead was ruined but the arrow was OK. Ten minutes later I heard grunting and more grunting and two little black piglets, maybe 25 pounds each, came ambling along, the lead piglet snorting the whole time. They came up to my feet before they saw me and then they stopped and stared. I watched them for a moment and then made a move and some noise and they took off. Five minutes later they were back and then ten minutes later they were back and then 20 minutes later they were back for the fourth time, the lead pig snorting with every footstep.

I remained still for another 5 minutes and then heard some faint rustling behind me. I looked over and thought I saw a herd of light brown pigs. It turned out to be a sow and the largest boar I have ever seen, by far. It was gigantic. I thought at first it was a domestic pig because it was huge and really fat, but closer examination showed the long snout, massive muscles, and cutters that stuck out like tusks. I'm not one to exaggerate, but that boar had to be 400+. I couldn't get a shot because it was 40 yards away and moving through heavy brush. I certainly didn't want to wound it. I stalked it but never saw it again.

I then walked down to the clearing and saw a pig's tail whipping around from behind a big tree. I tried to get in position for a shot but the pig must have become suspicious and it slowly walked into the tall grass.

Right at darkness, I went around to the upper part of this guy's property and saw the silhouette of a pig moving across the driveway. I turned on my indiglo bowsite lite and took a shot from 30 yards. I saw the sparks where the arrow hit lava and knew that I missed and that I ruined another broadhead. While I was retrieving my arrow, a small sow with 6 or 7 dinky piglets came running out from the grass and went right past me.

That was it for the evening. I think I'll go back this evening and concentrate on that giant boar. I'm not sure I'd have the nerve to shoot it at close range if it knows where I am. That thing was massive.

Aloha for now.
 



BDB

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 10, 2002
Messages
6,630
Reaction score
1
Another great write up. Thanks for the tale. Good luck on that big guy. Hit 'em good though, I"d hate to have to track him in thick cover when he is only pissed off
 

beastslayer

Banned
Joined
Apr 15, 2004
Messages
2,861
Reaction score
0
Outstanding story Doc.

Don't forget the camera when you did take that HUGE boar.

I would like to see how a 400-pounder look like.

And be safe. Are you carrying a pistol for back up?
 

THE ROMAN ARCHER

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
7,860
Reaction score
446
good story Doc, I wish I was eating marinated porkloin
on the grill today instead of marinated chicken.............tra
 

scott0san

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 19, 2002
Messages
102
Reaction score
1
Great story............It makes me wonder what I am still doing here in CA???????????? Oh Yea, I am waiting for the opening of A zone Deer where I will only have to compete with 87 other nimrods at my secret honey hole......Hope it cools down to the low 90's
Can't wait to see a pic of the Big Boar. Good luck
 

doccherry

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2002
Messages
424
Reaction score
0
I don't carry a firearm because there are too many houses in the area. Most parcels are about 3-5 acres, some a bit more, but all the lava rock makes a ricochet almost certain. I'm going back in about 30 minutes and if I do get a shot at that giant boar and wound it, I'm not going to track it at all unless there is a massive blood trail. The grass is really high, anywhere from 5 ot 7 feet high, and grows in clumps, resulting in visibility that is 5 feet or less. Can you imagine bumping into a massive, wounded boar at 5 feet and you're carrying a bow? No way. This is not trophy hunting over here, it's getting rid of great big rats that destroy the forests and jungles and native vegetation. And these critters are exploding in population and there are no predators other than guys like me and my Hawaiian friends. And we hunters are dwindling in numbers. There is no way on earth that these pigs can be controlled, even with hunting. You guys who hunt the Pacific Northwest picture this: berries everywhere, fruit everywhere, roots everywhere, thick cover that no human can penetrate, plenty of water, no predators, warm weather, no pig diseases---well, you get the picture.

I honestly hope I don't get a shot at that big fella because I can see all sorts of trouble. I'd much rather clobber another 60-80 pound pig, bone out 20 pounds of tender pork, and call it a day.

I still can't believe that hog!!! Never seen anything like it. I'll report if anything happens this evening.

Over and out.
 

larrysogla

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 27, 2003
Messages
3,068
Reaction score
23
Doc,
Lots of gratitude for endless fascinating tales from Hog Heaven. Definitely makes my evenings reading and salivating on your adrenaline filled hog 'ventures. HoooBoy!!!!! You are one lucky dude, Doccherry. Go get that Jumbo Jet of a hog. Thanks again for taking the time to excite us and entertain us with your swell 'ventures. 'Nuff said and God Bless.
 

doccherry

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2002
Messages
424
Reaction score
0
Just got back from my evening hunt and only saw one hog, a 125 pounder that came up behind me and scooted off when I turned around. Everything is up close because of the heavy vegetation so the pigs take off when they see you. By about November, almost all the grass and brush dies off and I'll be able to see for quite a distance---100 yards plus---and will be able to stalk the pigs and get more shots. But for now, it's hunting at halitosis distance and it's really tough. A big fat mango fell from a tree and landed about 2 feet from me and scared the heebie-jeebies out of me. I'm really on edge in that thick stuff and that giant hog doesn't make things any easier.

I'll look back on all this someday and realize, as Larry Sogla says, I've really been blessed. This island is something else.

Adios for now. Please post some more Tejon photos and stories. I'd love to hunt that place someday. I can't think of any hunting habitat I enjoy more than those rolling, grassy hills, oak trees, and that horrible chamise cover. Miss that a lot.

Doc
 

SDHNTR

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2002
Messages
6,716
Reaction score
13
is a treestand feasible in those locations? Seems like that would be the way to go.
 

Speckmisser

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 12, 2001
Messages
12,900
Reaction score
26
SD, you just beat me to the punch. From the sounds of it, a tree stand is exactly the ticket... if there are any trees big enough, and if the lower underbrush isn't too thick.

What about it, Doc? All these pigs coming up behind you and "scooting off"... just the kind of thing a tree stand will alleviate.
 

Lan-Lord

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2002
Messages
3,232
Reaction score
1
A treestand may give some peace of mind with regards to that huge pig too. Where I hunt, there are not any trees sturdy enough to support a treestand, so we use tripods a lot. I'm a big fan of the pod. Its easy to set up, move, and provides a stable rest to shoot from
. Regardless, great stories doc, I always look forward to them.

 

Surfswest

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 25, 2006
Messages
191
Reaction score
0
Wow!!!!! Once agani you got my heart pumping in excitement of your story. Sounds like you really do appreciate your blessing of being in the "Paradise" of the pig hunting world. Someday I would love to come over and help your friend "exterminate" some of his "great big rats" that are on his property. Till then, keep the stories coming, and be careful. Don't know what we would all do without your weekly paradise updataes!!!!


Frosty
 

doccherry

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2002
Messages
424
Reaction score
0
The undergrowth, specifically the tall grass, is so thick that you can't see a thing from above. I climbed a tree and at 10' off the ground I could see directly below but everything else was hidden by the vegetation. In 3 months, it will be a different story. But for now, it's really tough hunting. The only clearing at all is a 15 by 50 foot area that has a canopy of coffee leaves above it. Everything else is really close-in.
 

Nic Barca

Well-known member
Joined
May 19, 2006
Messages
223
Reaction score
0
The heck with stands, I love the close quarter hunting we got here! Just move really slow. And when you think your slow enough, slow down some more.

When walking through those crunchy leaves, try putting your foot down slowly, to where it takes 5 seconds or more to plant it firmly on the ground. If it's windy, move when the wind blows, or wait for a helicopter or airplane to go overhead. I'm usually not a big advocate of tree stands for hunting hawaiian pigs but I got to say: you can build a permanant blind up in a mango tree and put a tarp or roof over it, and that's about the best place one can be on a rainy day. You can make a sturdy blind with 2X4s, large nails, and some scrap plywood for sides (optional). ...or just use guava for everything and rope it all together.

Right on Doc. I love reading your stories and hope you get a chance at that big boar.
 

Hogfest

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 7, 2004
Messages
87
Reaction score
0
Doc,

As always, bummer of a day for you, but still paradise in my book. Although luck wasn't quite knocking on the right door for you, still enjoy every word of your recent adventures. Good luck on smackin that big boar right behind the shoulders.
 

ozstriker22

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 26, 2003
Messages
727
Reaction score
0
I always love to see the words: DOC CHERRY" below a post... I know it will be a good story.

Enjoy every bit of it, Doc! I know I sure would...

P.s. I may be wrong... but I think a little while ago you said you wear some type of soft-rubber slippers while stalking... was that you?
 

ducslayer

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 6, 2006
Messages
1,074
Reaction score
0
Hey Doc these pigs live close to houses so why not take a day and walk the main trails with a gas leaf blower? they have heard them before and the leaves will be gone for a time.
 

doccherry

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2002
Messages
424
Reaction score
0
No, I don't wear those soft slippers. I also no longer wear my desert boots because they squeak. I wear gray running shoes.

The last two times I went hunting at this place [Sunday and Monday] I only saw one pig but it was so light colored, almost a palomino color, that I was concerned at first that it might be a dog so I hesitated until I could be sure. It was a pig and it saw me right about the time I raised my bow to shoot and that was that.

I just bought a Barnett Revolution crossbow with a red dot scope. It shoots 22" bolts at 345 feet per second and has a much, much flatter trajectory than my PSE Quantum at 70 pounds. In fact, the drop at 40 yards is only half the PSE's drop. I truthfully think I can hit a pig at 50 yards and can make a very fast, accurate first shot, much more so than with the PSE. A second shot would probably take another 2 or 3 minutes, based upon my lack of experience with crossbows, so this is a one shot system. I can't use firearms because of the proximity of houses but it's really tough getting close enough to these hogs for a shot with my bow. That's because of two reasons. First, they are really spooky because they are hunted hard by dog hunters who hunt some of the adjacent ranches. Second, at this time of year, the undergrowth is so thick and high that I can't sneak up on the hogs and shots seem to be either 30 yards plus where the hog hasn't seen me or at less than 10 yards where the hog has seen me and is running flat out for cover that is only 18 inches away. I'm going to climb a tree or set up a treestand where I can see some openings 40 or 50 yards away and give the crossbow a go. I'll use a rangefinder to figure out the distances to various openings and go from there.

I've gotten to the point where the adrenaline rush of hunting these hogs in close cover with a bow has become an addiction. If I go more than a few days without doing it, I go into withdrawals. Seriously, I do think I'm hooked on the adrenaline rush of dealing with huge boars at close quarters with a stick and string.

Aloha for now.
 

larrysogla

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 27, 2003
Messages
3,068
Reaction score
23
Way to go Doc. Go get 'um. That is one fantastic life in the suburbs that you are living. Arrowing piggies in some neighbor's driveway and backyard. Keep us posted. We are addicted to this Hawaiian style hunting in the suburbs. We enjoy every blow by blow account. Many thanks Doc. God Bless, always.
 

Speckmisser

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 12, 2001
Messages
12,900
Reaction score
26
Hey Doc,

That crossbow sounds like the way to go. Just watch out on those long shots, as the crossbow bolt loses velocity just like an arrow... and a lot can happen between release and impact. 50 yards is long... do-able, but long.

That said, I hunted SC a couple years back with some boys who were using crossbows. They killed two pigs and a deer, and recovery for all of them was less than 50 yards. Not a bad record.

Good luck, and looking forward to reading more of your tales.

I'm gonna be in Maui in October, but only a short trip and no opportunity to get over to the Big Island. One of these days, though, I'm gonna have to catch up with you and just get a look at this paradise you're living in!
 

Latest Posts



Top Bottom