Bolt action Rifled slug gun. Thoughts? Savage 220, Tar-Hunt, Browning A Bolt

ltdann

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
4,745
Reaction score
122
Anyone have one that would like to share? I had my auto 11-87 jam on me at a critical moment and some of the old timers were telling me how good the 20 gauge bolt guns are.Near as I can tell, Savage is the only people making them right now. I'd appreciate any pro-con info you might have, including accuracy and range info and general overall performance.
 

DirtyDave

Banned
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
1,053
Reaction score
34
I have never shot one, but there is something pretty cool about a bolt action shotgun. I have a scoped 12ga Mossy 500 slug gun. Pumps are about as reliable as you can get. I can cycle a pump gun faster than a bolt gun for a follow up shot. Mossberg has rifled barrels for both the 20 and 12ga. You can typically find used 20ga 500's for pretty cheap, and even if you buy new they are still inexpensive.
 

k_rad

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Messages
2,301
Reaction score
75
Dann I just read something about Browning coming out with a bolt action slug gun. I have also seen other gun makers models try the market at one time or another. look on Auction arms. If you remember last year I almost bought a savage 20ga. but it took Turners 3 months to tell me that it would be another month or so. So I went with the muzzeloader. Now that I can be a little more objective about it I would have to agree with Dave and say that for fast repetative shots and a reliable uncomplicated action the pump with the riffled barrel is the way to go. I wonder if you are pig hunting with it do you have to keep the plug in?
Looked like it worked for that last deer BTW...just sayin
 

ltdann

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
4,745
Reaction score
122
Gents, on the surface, I'd agree with on the pump, but you've never seen me throw a bolt. I really like the 11-87 and paid big money for it and its pretty accurate. I just keep hearing the old timers say cloverleaf patterns with 20 gauge bolt guns, with increased range. More than a handful of folks have told me that.

My 11-87 cantilever won't cloverleaf at 100, the best I can get is about 2-3 inch groups. I can live with that, but when it jams too? I haven't broken it down yet (this weekend) but I'm pretty sure I'll find a piece of crud in the gas holes. We'll see.

I kinda like the thought of a bolt slug gun. Nothing really to fail and bolt guns have always been more accurate than auto's. Not sure I want to buy another gun yet, just kinda exploring the possibilities.
 

map

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2007
Messages
2,098
Reaction score
30
Browning is supposed to start making their A-Bolt Shotguns again, but I haven't seen any yet. They kick like a mule, because of having a rifle stock. If I wasn't age 70 I would be first in line for one.
 

Attachments

map

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2007
Messages
2,098
Reaction score
30
I always wanted one, so I will probably buy one for my boy. He hunts in Training Area 29. He shot his first bore there at age 14 using 20 gauge slugs.


Sent from my iPhone/Tapatalk
 

myfriendis410

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2006
Messages
2,814
Reaction score
85
No question; the bolt gun is going to group better than any pump or auto. The Savage will do everything you want it to, and then some. I already gave you a price.
 

ltdann

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
4,745
Reaction score
122
No question; the bolt gun is going to group better than any pump or auto. The Savage will do everything you want it to, and then some. I already gave you a price.
yeah, the more I read, the more impressed I get. Still, its another gun... Better find out what happened with the 11-87 first and go from there. I switched to the 2 3/4, 1 oz copper solids. I sighted in with 10 rds and was happy with the grouping. But I only fired single shots. It ejected fine, both on the bench in the field. It just feed jammed on the second round (twice). Maybe not enough energy?
 

map

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2007
Messages
2,098
Reaction score
30
The 11-87 is based on the Remington 1100, and I have been Hunting/Trap Shooting with that 1100 since 1968. Remington autoloaders are probably the most reliable guns available, however, being as forgiving as they are, causes a lot of guys to put them away after hunting without cleaning them.

I am one of the guilty ones, and through the years that 1100 has been back to the Remington shop twice. What happens if you abuse the 1100 it will eventually jam up so tight that only a gun smith can disassemble it.

If that were to happen during boar hunting it could cost you your life. On the other hand, the A-Bolt action will work even if the clip jams. When the 1100 tube feed lever jams the Bolt it has to be return to Remington.

It takes discipline to clean an autoloader after each use, but it's something that has to be done. Vietnam taught me that.


Sent from my iPhone/Tapatalk
 

ltdann

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
4,745
Reaction score
122
As soon as it happened, I thought, the gas hole got plugged. I thought I'd get more than 10 rds between cleaning, but in retrospect, shot gun powder is big and dirty so I don't know why I'm suprised. I guess because it never happened before, and certainly not in the clinch.

It gets a good looking over this weekend and a good cleaning. We'll see.
 

myfriendis410

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2006
Messages
2,814
Reaction score
85
My bet is the O-ring has a chinger. Not quite enough energy to fully cycle the bolt. You are right about the powder, particularly the powder used for saboted rounds; it's dirty. However; the energy budget (gas) is very high with those hot loads.
 

ltdann

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
4,745
Reaction score
122
A chinger? Is that a technical term for a nick or cut:rotflmao:
 

map

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2007
Messages
2,098
Reaction score
30
On the outside of the tube that holds the shells are three gas metering rings. The tube must be clean, bone dry, and as smoothed glass before hunting dangerous game like bear or boar. It is possible to install the three rings out of order, so check your manual. Also, the ID of the gas metering rings must be clean and smooth as glass. I hunt with the tube and rings dry, and only give them a light coat of gun oil when stored for more than a few days.

All of the guts that operate the bolt and slide must also be cleaned before hunting. Duck hunting, well, I don't mind an empty case not ejecting once I'm a while.


Sent from my iPhone/Tapatalk
 

bughalli

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 9, 2007
Messages
188
Reaction score
0
There are three bolt action shotguns. Savage 20ga, the new a-bolt 12ga (3inch) from Browning and a 3rd brand I can't recall. The savage is hard to beat for the price. ($400). People love it. The browning is new this year, quality gun/trigger, but expensive. Cabelas has them on sale as part of their 50th anniversary for $999. They kick like a mule, but pack a punch on game as well. They shoot almost as well as black powder, but now you have two additional rounds. The 3rd manufacturer is really expensive. Can't remember the name, but their gun was like $2k. If you do your research you'll find high velocity sabots for 12 ga that are just amazing. You can shoot to 200yrds with a steady rest, buy you gotta use a range finder to be ethically accurate.

Browning made an bolt action about 10 years ago. I think mossberg did as well, but older. They don't have the same barrel twist, so they weren't as accurate. The new ones have the same twist as modern black powder barrels.

Believe it or not reliability has been an issue for all the bolt actions. They'll shoot fine, but shell extraction has been an issue with some.

I'm not that much into guns, more a hunter, but did a good amount of research. I thought about going back to Idaho this year. They have a special short range weapon season. My muzzleloader was way too unreliable last year and cost me filling my tag twice! Thus, a long range shotgun sounds very appealing. Unfortunately this year Idaho reduced their seasons. So I didn't buy one.

Oh....pretty sure the 11-87 and 1100 are the same gun. Built on the same platform other than maybe shell size. Hence Remingtonwent back to only selling the 1100. Super reliable guns. I did a lot of deer, duck and pheasant hunting with mine. Only jammed once...when a 3 inch slug got mixed in my 2 3/4. But it still shot it and dropped the 8 pointer, just jammed on exit.
 

ltdann

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
4,745
Reaction score
122
On the outside of the tube that holds the shells are three gas metering rings. The tube must be clean, bone dry, and as smoothed glass before hunting dangerous game like bear or boar. It is possible to install the three rings out of order, so check your manual. Also, the ID of the gas metering rings must be clean and smooth as glass. I hunt with the tube and rings dry, and only give them a light coat of gun oil when stored for more than a few days.

All of the guts that operate the bolt and slide must also be cleaned before hunting. Duck hunting, well, I don't mind an empty case not ejecting once I'm a while.


Sent from my iPhone/Tapatalk
Did a thorough cleaning on the 11-87, it was dirtier than I liked, but less than I thought. My 11-87 has two gas metering components, a piston seal/piston assembly and a barrel seal. Both were in good condition, although the magazine tube was dirty.

Well, I think the problem was the slug rounds were extra dirty, enough so that after 10 rounds sighting in, it required a cleaning.
 

Common Sense

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 20, 2004
Messages
10,540
Reaction score
139
My first "real" gun was a .410 bolt action smooth-bore. It jams all the time!
 

map

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2007
Messages
2,098
Reaction score
30
Let me guess: a J C Higgins from Sears Roebuck and Company?


Sent from my iPhone/Tapatalk
 

Common Sense

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 20, 2004
Messages
10,540
Reaction score
139
Probably, can't remember and loaned it to a friend a couple of years ago. This thread reminded me I need to get it back. My old man paid $25 for it at Boas Minnow Farm over fifty years ago. It was used then.

A few years later my grandfather bought me a brand new pump 20 guage from Sears. It was my favorite gun of all time, and for a few years I literally put hundreds of rounds through it every week of the year(and most of them reloaded very "hot").
 

Latest Posts

Advertisement



Top Bottom