books?

fishnhuntfreak

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so i always hated reading all through high school. then last week at collage my teacher had me read into the wild and suprisingly enjoyed it and found myself reading every chance i got. i think the reason i hated reading so much is because i was never intersted in any of the books the teachers had me reading. what are some good books that are kinda simular to into the wild? what are some of your favorite books?
 



BelchFire

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I'm reading "At the Foot of the Rockies; Stories of Mountain and Plain" by George H. delaVergne now. It was written in 1901 and is pretty good. It's all about boys being boys in Cripple Creek, Colorado in the late 1800's.

Then there's "Journal of a Trapper" by Osbourne Russell. The subtitle is "A hunter's rambles among the wild regions of the rocky mountains, 1834-1843". It's a true story of a mountain man living in what is now Yellowstone. Good reading.

Also "The Log of a Cowboy", by Andy Adams is a true narrative of a cattle drive from Mexico to Montana in 1882.

Finally, there's Davy Crockett's autobiography. It's all good reading and every bit of it's in his own words, except of course, the last chapter.

The first, I picked up on E-Bay, but the last three are all current titles and I bought them through Barnes and Nobles. I would recommend them all. They're good "outdoors", western style, adventure books, but the best part to me is that they're all true stories.

If you're into fiction, I would recommend anything by Louis L'Amour. He's an outstanding writer and I've ready every book he's published. If you want to try him out, start with the Sackett series. He packs 'em full of adventure, and gunslinging!

Glad you're into reading. You can go anywhere in the world for less than $10, and you can go again, and again, and again.
 

Sumpnneedskillin

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I'm into 1800's US Western History. So things about mountain men, explorers and some military men/battles are what I've been reading lately. I just read a dual biography about Custer and Crazy Horse, one about Kit Carson and currently reading one about John Fremont. I liked the Carson one so much I found his autobiography. I'll read that after I finish the Fremont book.
 

fishnhuntfreak

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (BelchFire @ Apr 5 2008, 05:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I'm reading "At the Foot of the Rockies; Stories of Mountain and Plain" by George H. delaVergne now. It was written in 1901 and is pretty good. It's all about boys being boys in Cripple Creek, Colorado in the late 1800's.

Then there's "Journal of a Trapper" by Osbourne Russell. The subtitle is "A hunter's rambles among the wild regions of the rocky mountains, 1834-1843". It's a true story of a mountain man living in what is now Yellowstone. Good reading.

Also "The Log of a Cowboy", by Andy Adams is a true narrative of a cattle drive from Mexico to Montana in 1882.

Finally, there's Davy Crockett's autobiography. It's all good reading and every bit of it's in his own words, except of course, the last chapter.

The first, I picked up on E-Bay, but the last three are all current titles and I bought them through Barnes and Nobles. I would recommend them all. They're good "outdoors", western style, adventure books, but the best part to me is that they're all true stories.

If you're into fiction, I would recommend anything by Louis L'Amour. He's an outstanding writer and I've ready every book he's published. If you want to try him out, start with the Sackett series. He packs 'em full of adventure, and gunslinging!

Glad you're into reading. You can go anywhere in the world for less than $10, and you can go again, and again, and again.[/b]
just ordered Davy Crockett's autobiography and Journal of a Trapper from amazon. anyone else have any others?
 

BelchFire

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Sumpn,

Tell me more about that biography of Custer and Crazy Horse. Full title? ISBN? Editor? Publisher? Sounds like a must have!
 

tmoniz

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I'm Sorry.
But I have a Degree in English.
Read a lot of books.

So I'm going to give you all a test.

What did Edward Abbey write.
Who wrote "To a God Unknown."
Who wrote "Martin Eden."
"Good fences make good neighbors" came from what poem. And by who.
Who wrote 'Frankenstein."
Dracula was actually a love story written by who.

This guy was a very interesting author.
One of his most famous novels was made into a very well known movie.
But he wrote a novel called "Other Voices, Other Rooms."
 

Tominator

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (tmoniz @ Apr 5 2008, 10:05 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
"Good fences make good neighbors" came from what poem. And by who.[/b]
Mending Wall, Robert Frost.

If it's reading you want, Larry McMurtry's "Lonesome Dove" is a bonafide "Must Read"
I'm getting ready to get my Hemingway fix myself.
 

Sumpnneedskillin

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Belch,

It's a biography by Stephen Ambrose. It's titled "Crazy Horse and Custer The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors". I already knew some things about the two of them but it really opened my eyes. I was in Barnes and Noble the other day and contemplated buying a couple of the books written from the oral history of the Sioux about the Battle of Little Big Horn. I bought Kit Carson's autobiography instead.

tmoniz
The only one I know without cheating is who wrote "Frankenstein". Mary Shelley.
 

COHunter

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I am a rabid reader, especially books concerning the Rockies and the Plains Indian tribes.

Recently I finished the following books:

Black Kettle: the Cheyenne Chief who wanted Peace, but only found War

Chiefs and Generals (Famous Indians & Western Generals)

I have 20 pages left reading Ben Franklins autobiography (very hard read since it was written in has hand in old English)

I just bought Blood and Thunder: An Epic of the American West at Bents Fort for all you history buffs

And today foulshot and I were up in Nebraska near Fort Robinson which everyone who's ever read about Crazy Horse should know about

Hey Belchfire, Cripple Creek aint at the foot of the Rockies, its in them. My house is at the foot of the Rockies where the Mountains meet the plains.
 

Common Sense

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (tmoniz @ Apr 5 2008, 07:05 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I'm Sorry.
But I have a Degree in English.
Read a lot of books.[/b]


Hey tmoniz; what a worthless, wimpy major you had in college. (but I also have read a lot of books because I have a Degree in English
)


Never really cared much for the "wild" books after I got old enough to shave; but those Jack London short stories about the north country are pretty good reading. His stories are about adventure and nature, but mostly they deal with the human spirit.

Hate to admit it, but even though he wrote juvenile escapist trash, several of John Steinbeck's novels and short stories of early CA are very good in my opinion. Old Steinbeck was a very liberal feller, probably a socailist or commie; but he is the one who turned me on to reading.
 

Sumpnneedskillin

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COHunter how was the Black Kettle book? I looked at that one too the other day. It looked interesting.

When I go to the book store I find lots of books but I behave myself and buy one or two. If I don't control myself I'd walk out of the store with a whole shelf of history books.
 

D3Lifer

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If you want a very good account of the Custers last stand, try "Son of the Morning Star" By Evan Connell. I als recommend George Catlin's two volume "Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Conditions of North American Indians". Catlin spent 8 years(1832-1839) travelling and living among Plains Indians Tribes before the Western expansion. He foresaw their eventual plight and documented their lives in words and pictures. His work has been recognized as the best comprehensive account of Indian life before their eventual displacement. Another real good non-fiction read is " A treasury of the Sierra Nevada". It includes essays and accounts of early Sierra life by immigrants, mountain men, and explorers. It also includes the writings of Mark Twain, John Muir Robert Louis Stephenson, and Walt Whitman. Great Read. Anyway, I hope you get a chance to check these books out. Non fiction accounts of our wild west are priceless, and just as captivating as much of the fiction about the period.
 

COHunter

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The book on Black Kettle was a great read!!!

What makes it an even better book for me, is most of what occured happened within 3 hours of my house, so I know the places where many of the events occured. Fort Lyon, Bents Fort, Sand Creek, the Republican River, Beecher Island, etc are all near places where I hunt.

I also highly recommend the book "The Southern Cheyennes" to go with it
 

Buck-eye

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Where the Red Fern Grows
Needful Things (Stephen King)
Inferno (Dante's)
The Diary Of Saint Francis (Kastanzakis sp)

Tao de Ching - instrumental in chaning my life

Ecelectic list, but all were placed at perfect times in my life where I immersed myself in them.
 

arizona hunter

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Theodore Roosevelts "African Game Trails", anything by Finn Aaggard, anything by Pere Capstick.
 

tmoniz

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If you want to get started on Hemingway read The Snows of Kilimanjaro.
That's a great read.
Mark Twain's books were great.
I think I enjoyed Steinbeck more than anyone.

When my aunt found out how much I enjoyed Steinbeck and I was getting my degree in English and starting to teach.
She spent all night at the front of a little Post Office in Salinas that was getting ready to issue the very first postage stamps and envelopes commemorating John Steinbeck.
She gave me the very first ones issued as a graduation present.
Very special.

If you do anything in life as a parent. Read to your children when they are very young. Read with them when they first start to read. And then encourage them to continue to read.

My dad read alot of Zane Grey. He wasn't very much into the TV. It got turned off at 7 every evening.
After I did my homework I would go to bed and read JC Oconnors stuff.

One of my favorite authors is Richard Brautigan.
If you ever want a good chuckle about life this is the guy.

Lots of good stuff out there to read.
 

Caninelaw

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Zane Gray wrote a lot of good westerns. He was also a very avid big game fisherman and wrote about that also. I believe he was the first to catch a marlin over 1000 pounds. He had his own boat that he took all over the world chasing big fish. I believe one of the books he wrote about his fishing adventures was "Zane Gray Outdoorsman".
 

tmoniz

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Canine.

That sounds like a good read. I'm gonna look for that.

Thanks.
 


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