Bushnell Yardage Pro Scout 1000 ARC

SDHNTR

Well-known member
Anyone used this rangefinder? I want one with the angle compensating feature but I want it to work at longer ranges in the bow mode (which is why I'm posting in the bowhunting forum). I looked at the Leupold and I don't like the way it maxes out at 60 yards in bow mode. I want one that will range a bit farther and give me the real yardage. What say ya'll?
 

Raully

Well-known member
I think they all max out to 60 yards or less. The bow models anyways. I read all the reviews in Cabelas and they all seamed to have a lot of bugs and issues. So I stayed away. I finally coughed up the dough and got a Leica. Almost dont need to a pair of Binos it's so clear. I've only been bow hunting for about 2 years and most of my shots aren't that steep of an angle to make a difference. I just hold a little lower or go to a lower yardage pin. My buddy has a the Bushnell model and he likes it.
 

SDHNTR

Well-known member
This one supposedly goes to 99 in bow mode. I just want to know if that is realistic. Not that I need that much, but I might need more than 60. An animal could be at 68 yards downhill but you might shoot it for 45. That is a very makeable shot if you know the true yardage. 60 might cut it for the back east tree stand whitetail hunter but not for the Western mountain hunter. If Leica made an angle-dangler, I'd probably save up and buy it.
 

The Carpenter

Active member
Hey SDHNTR:

I've been using the Yardage Pro 1000 for years and recently decided to swithch over to an angle compensating range finder. One of my buddies uses the Bushnell Elite with Arc and he likes it a lot, particularly because you hold it the same way you hold your binoculars. One of my other buddies uses the Nikon Archer's Choice. It magnifies up to 6X and is really clear. The only downfall is that it has a 100 yard limit. After doing some reasearch, I ended up buying the Nikon Riflehunter 550 with ID technology. I found that this range finder is really clear, water proof, and does not have a bunch numbers show up on the screen. It only gives you one number, either the yardage with ID (Incline/Decline) turned on, or the yardage with it turned off which is the strait yardage. It only costs about $40.00 ($279.99 for Brown) more than the Archer's Choice and has all the same features except that it allows you to range further distances. Bass Pro hass all these range finders in their Rancho store. It's really nice to try them out befor buying one.

Good Luck
 

Raully

Well-known member
SDHNTR thats one of the reasons I didn't buy one. If I remember right they only went to about 60 or 100 yrds at the time. The new ones might be better. Like I said my buddy he likes his so far. Don't know if he's tried it on any steep angles yet. If he does I'll let you know.
 

barel74

Well-known member
Any feedback from someone who has ACTUALLY used the angle mode out to 99yds on the Bushnell? The extra 40 yds with the incline just might all the difference in the world.
 

Dubya D

Well-known member
I own one and am pretty happy with it. It does range out to 99 yards in bow mode.

Pros
easy to use
5x magnification
calculates true distance very fast
reasonbly priced

Cons
case sucks
not great in low light conditions
 

SDHNTR

Well-known member
Well I bought one. If it sucks Ill return it. The extra 40 yards sealed the deal for me, and I could have got a deal on the Leupy. Thanks for the help.
 

socalgunrep21

Well-known member
The Leupold is VERY hard to program. I have the Elite with ARC and would not use anything else. The only drawback is the size of the rangefinder.
 

Buck-eye

Moderator
Moderator
I agree on the Leupy. Great scope - average range finders. Harder to program and line of sight seems less clear that a Bushnell.
 

wvbowhunterinalaska

Active member
Wife bought me one last year and I have recently this fall started using it at the local 3-d range. I love it. Took it out the other day while the snow was falling (dropping quarter sized flakes and at a pretty good rate), I hit solid targets out to about 120 yards. I think the key is hitting solid targets to get good readings. It gave me the angle (albeit it was flat ground) of the reading it took with it. I was thinking that the snow flakes was going to give me false readings, but I was wrong. Only problem I had with it was at times it doesn't want to range, but I blame that on having taken many measurements in a short time frame or the rain might have made it not shoot properly, not sure about it. I usually put it back in the holster and pulled it back out a few seconds later and then it works fine. Overall I think for the budget conscience hunter who is looking for an angle compensation range finder without too much hassle I think the bushnell is the best deal going.
WVBOWAK
 


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