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CA Pronghorn Study. Why the decline of a once robust herd of 500K.

spectr17

Administrator
Admin
CA ANTELOPE. The reasons behind the decline of California’s once-robust pronghorn antelope populations have long been a mystery. A CDFW-funded study tracked the behavior of a Modoc Plateau herd over two years, and the findings have led scientists to conclude that certain habitat restoration efforts could help the pronghorn population rebound. Read more about the study findings and results below.

https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Science-Institute/News/PostId/30/pronghorn-study
 

cjack

Well-known member
One thing that did not surprise me about this study is that 80% of the mortality rate was as a result of mountain lion attacks. A few things stood out to me in this study, one is the amount of information that the researchers were able to gather from captured animals in just 8 minutes of captivity and the other is that less cover vegetation is actually crucial to their survival. Very interesting article.
 

ChrisAMX

Well-known member
Don't know how true this is, but someone told me once that coyotes figured out when the ewes were going to give birth and would wait on that. Apparently they give birth fairly close to each other.
 

Plain ol' Steve

Well-known member
One thing that did not surprise me about this study is that 80% of the mortality rate was as a result of mountain lion attacks. A few things stood out to me in this study, one is the amount of information that the researchers were able to gather from captured animals in just 8 minutes of captivity and the other is that less cover vegetation is actually crucial to their survival. Very interesting article.
Not 80%, but 80% of the mortality by predators. Still a high number I'm sure.

Nice to see that somebody is looking after them and spending some money on understanding what is going on the total population is a lot smaller than I would have ever guessed. California is so intensively cultivated and fenced I can't help but wonder how much that plays into it. Alfalfa may not hurt them much but fruit and nut trees are no habitat for antelope.

Thanks for posting the story.
 
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HuntingFool03

Well-known member
I live in Modoc and to tell you the truth the lions are running out of deer to eat up here and they are hammering the antelope population. In the lassen unit there are a huge family of non american's and are poaching the antelope. Fish and game has tried to bust them but the case got thrown out in court cause of misfiled paperwork. They were on the hook for 17 poached goats. Who knows how many they have killed under the radar. California needs to do more for our antelope population before we loose resource as well.
 

4x4Buck

Member
I keep putting in for antelope in that area. Between the poaching and mountain lions, I hope there are some left when/if I ever get drawn.
 

ChrisAMX

Well-known member
Over development is also an issue. The population has more than doubled here since late 70's. Currently, the last remaining herd of Antelope in the Antelope Valley are gong to be wiped out by the Tejon Ranch Centennial Project. They are not doing some small development, its going to be a city of 60,000 people. The project consists of about 19,000 houses and 10 million square feet of commercial, retail space.

The Newhall Ranch Project is going to be 26,000 homes and the Grapevine Project if 12,00 Units of housing. Surely, these kind of massive developments have a negative impact on wildlife.
 

jrappyo

Active member
this is a damned shame, i love pronghorn. Find them very interesting animals. Thanks for sharing the article.
 


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