Cameras nab deer, bad guys

spectr17

Administrator
Admin
Joined
Mar 11, 2001
Messages
69,496
Reaction score
387
Cameras nab deer, bad guys

More people using them for fun and security

11/18/01

By ALAN CLEMONS

Huntsville Times Outdoors Editor aclemons@htimes.com

Preston Pittman got a front porch dog-cussin' after warning the poacher not to trespass on his property because law enforcement officials would be involved the next time, if there was one.

The poacher didn't listen, but Pittman had more than a sheriff's deputy with him the next time he knocked on the guy's door. Pittman had photos of the guy taken by a wildlife camera hung on a tree to show him what kind of deer and turkeys were moving through the area.
   
Bagging the poacher, so to speak, was a bonus.

"He started cussin' me again when I went back," said Pittman, a noted hunter and game call manufacturer from Mississippi. "Then I held up the photos of him with one leg over my fence coming on the property, and one of him leaving with his other leg over the fence.

"He started backtracking and apologizing. But it was too late. They hauled him off to jail and I had him charged with everything they legally could do, which wasn't much. But it sent a message. He never returned as far as I know."

Wildlife cameras have become more than toys for hunters, clubs, lodges and even businesses and families. There are several brands on the market, including one made by Alabama manufacturer Moultrie Feeders of Alabaster. A motion sensor trips a camera secured in an internal, weather-proof housing and snaps a photo.

"The neatest thing is the hunters send me photos every week," said company founder Dan Moultrie. "I get stacks of pictures because the hunters are so proud of them. But we've heard about construction firms, schools and parents who are using them. I've had a few parents tell me they put them in their home to see who's with their kids. We're selling a lot for security to people who mount them on the wall inside or outside their boat house."

Most camera packages have several options, such as time and date or flash capabilities. They cost a few hundred dollars and come with weather-proof plastic housings.

Hunters tell Moultrie they learn about some animal habits by studying the times that photos are taken. They hang the cameras on known or suspected woodland travel routes to see what's coming by, and when.

But catching poachers or trespassers is a primary use for many camera buyers.

"You can set cameras to have the flash on or off, for daylight or nighttime operation, or a number of combinations," Moultrie said.
 

spectr17

Administrator
Admin
Joined
Mar 11, 2001
Messages
69,496
Reaction score
387
Cameras nab deer, bad guys

More people using them for fun and security

11/18/01

By ALAN CLEMONS

Huntsville Times Outdoors Editor aclemons@htimes.com

Preston Pittman got a front porch dog-cussin' after warning the poacher not to trespass on his property because law enforcement officials would be involved the next time, if there was one.

The poacher didn't listen, but Pittman had more than a sheriff's deputy with him the next time he knocked on the guy's door. Pittman had photos of the guy taken by a wildlife camera hung on a tree to show him what kind of deer and turkeys were moving through the area.
   
Bagging the poacher, so to speak, was a bonus.

"He started cussin' me again when I went back," said Pittman, a noted hunter and game call manufacturer from Mississippi. "Then I held up the photos of him with one leg over my fence coming on the property, and one of him leaving with his other leg over the fence.

"He started backtracking and apologizing. But it was too late. They hauled him off to jail and I had him charged with everything they legally could do, which wasn't much. But it sent a message. He never returned as far as I know."

Wildlife cameras have become more than toys for hunters, clubs, lodges and even businesses and families. There are several brands on the market, including one made by Alabama manufacturer Moultrie Feeders of Alabaster. A motion sensor trips a camera secured in an internal, weather-proof housing and snaps a photo.

"The neatest thing is the hunters send me photos every week," said company founder Dan Moultrie. "I get stacks of pictures because the hunters are so proud of them. But we've heard about construction firms, schools and parents who are using them. I've had a few parents tell me they put them in their home to see who's with their kids. We're selling a lot for security to people who mount them on the wall inside or outside their boat house."

Most camera packages have several options, such as time and date or flash capabilities. They cost a few hundred dollars and come with weather-proof plastic housings.

Hunters tell Moultrie they learn about some animal habits by studying the times that photos are taken. They hang the cameras on known or suspected woodland travel routes to see what's coming by, and when.

But catching poachers or trespassers is a primary use for many camera buyers.

"You can set cameras to have the flash on or off, for daylight or nighttime operation, or a number of combinations," Moultrie said.

==========================================================




If you'd like to buy one of these game cameras but cannot afford several hundred dollars for one, please check out our home made game camera webpage and the forum section where you can easily make one for under $100.00

http://www.jesseshuntingpage.com/homebrew-cams.html

http://www.jesseshuntingpage.com/cgi-bin/i...ms.cgi?forum=11
 


Top Bottom