Can a Barnes TSX 55gr .223 go thru Shoulder on SoCal deer?

TheGDog

Well-known member
Today my waiting period was up and I picked-up my BDay present to myself, a new Remington 783 Bolt-Action (combo with Scope) in .223 Rem. My thought was Varmints and 'Yotes. Plus cheaper ammo for practicing. Plus I could use this to begin my boy in CenterFire rifles in a few years.

But I've been doing a lot of reading and reviewing about taking Deer with .223 and I think I'd like to try it. The D15 deer aren't very big anyway. But... I need to maximize my chances that the Buck will go down right there, as I was near to a private property border. As such I've been studying/reviewing where neck shots and brain shots should occur. But I will say that I have concerns about those shots not executing properly. The deer turns when I don't expect it or whatever.

So what I'd like to know is if I instead just go with the old reliable heart/lung shot... if I were to try "break-down" his shoulder, on the entry side for example, as an attempt to ensure that I've "anchored him"... would a Barnes TSX 55gr in .223 still have enough energy to make an exit wound after hitting a entry shoulder blade? I feel pretty certain it would pass-thru the entry-side shoulder blade and then damage lung... I just am not familiar enough with this round to know if it'd ALSO be able to take out the opposite shoulder and exit during the same shot.

Or...???.... should I perhaps (this time actually) TRY to do the whole shoot a high lung-shot again (Which is kinda/sorta what happened last year) that has the possibility of exerting force/damage on the spine?

-G
 

CL&RR

Well-known member
Looks like the twist rate of that barrel is a 1/9 you can go as heavy as 65 to 69 grn bullets. Shot placement is key, I would rather take a heart and lung broadside shot than risk missing with a neck shot. There's going to be guys arguing about the 223 but within 100yds good shot placement it'll do the trick. I've taken a few blacktails with my 223 DRT. Barnes has a 62grn TSX I believe.
 

TheGDog

Well-known member
Roger that. In the meantime.... with my AirRifle I've been practicing headshot'ing sparrows at 20yds to keep my marksmenship up. ;)


I actually wanted to buy the 62 gr. But the vendor I was using (BassPro) didn't seem to offer it in that weight.


Since then I've found several reviews where folks have used the 55gr and were singing it's praises, so I think I should be alright.
 

OPAH

Well-known member
223? spend the range time and sight the puppy in, go as heavy as you can 65 to 69 grn bullets, keep your shots with in 100 yards, and take the heart lung shot, too much to go astray with the head or neck shot.
Shoot the heck out of the Yotes and Varmints before deer season!!!! Hey where are the pics? want to see this bad puppy
 

parkermann

Well-known member
If you are going to use the 223 just make sure you shoot your gun often. Don't just run to the range the week before the season and shoot 5-10 shots. Shoot regularly. And use as heavy of a bullet as you can
 

fishnhunt

Well-known member
I'm a proponent of using smaller (as appropriate) cartridges especially for kids/women. The smaller calibers allow them to be more accurate than most of the larger categories. An appropriate small cartridge in the boiler room will kill an animal just as dead...A small bullet in the leg will wound an animal just as much as a big round. My wife has killed large (for antelope) antelope at over 200 yards with a 55grn 22/250 which is essentially the same size as the .223. And a coastal CA deer is about the same size....
One of my coworkers regularly shoots Nevada mule deer with her 22/250 at pretty good distances.
 

CL&RR

Well-known member
Another great round with very little recoil is the 300blk. You can go supersonic with 115 grains or load some thumper 220grn bullets. My 13 year old has been shooting a rem700 in 300blk and it's a nice easy round. Ruger makes a cheap bolt gun, the Ruger American in 300blk also.
 

TheGDog

Well-known member
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OPAH

Well-known member
That Is a heavy (almost Bull Barrel) Barrel there Bud, It looks to be a floating barrel, can you slide a dollar bill between the barrel and stock all the way down to the breech? Where do you go to sight? got to be pretty far?
I lived on the star of the "S" turn on Magnolia just before Garden grove Blvd for years, back then it was just a big field with one house on it, looks like a building complex now
 
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TheGDog

Well-known member
I'll probably goto a nearby indoor range (FT3) to initially sight it in (at -.38 below center in order to get a 200 yard zero. Makes it just +1.5 above at 100 yards.

Or.... I'll probably just do Burro Canyon to sight this one in. Dunno. May do both.


I could also go to my younger Brothers property which sits on border of Northern half of D11 (above Hwy 14) just below Quail Lake area. (a little before Hungry Valley Offroad area, but on the East side of 5 Fwy)

Haven't done the dollar trick but yes, the 783 is free-floated and pillar-bedded.
 

mezcan

Well-known member
Gary, coastal black tails you don't see until you get in northern California and the Northwest and another strain in Alaska. Southern California variety of mule deer down here.


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TheGDog

Well-known member
My point whas that you can find tons of articles talking about it's a fine round on WhiteTails. Aren't Whitetails more stout than the scrawny lads we'd be seeing in D11, D13, D15?

There for if there are all these dudes saying they take down Whitetails just fine with .223 Rem... then it should be fine to take them out with .223. our Sothern Califoria variety of mule deer.
 

OPAH

Well-known member
As all have said with good shot placement, It will work fine. you just may have to track It a little farther after you pop It.
but it will go down wit a heart/lung shot. So stop fretting and get out and shoot that bad puppy, hear the yap when it reports.
 

Beastmode

Well-known member
Barnes bullets are extremely solid bullets. I have killed quite a few animals with them. It would have no problem going through a deers shoulder blade but I don't think a 55 grain bullet would consistently make it through 2 shoulder blades.

These bullets hold together incredibly and don't loose energy due to rapid expansion. Thus means really good penetration but the trade off is smaller exit holes which generally means harder tracking. You generally don't see animals DRT with barnes but they still kill.

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parkermann

Well-known member
Not true beast mode. I use 150 grain tipped tsx Barnes for pigs. I have shot 3 pigs one was pushing 300 lbs. all had 3-4 inch exit wounds. All three pigs I've shot were DRT. The Barnes did devastating damage
 


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