Clueless hunters aren't just on weekends anymore




wingbone_2003

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Personally i would not talk to a local paper all that will do is make thing's worse,that's why i don't go to the tune-up either,there is alot of public land out there and the spot's that everyone complains about is no secret because those are the one they are told to go check out by dfg,forest biologist etc...this year i have harvested two bird's on public land in these area's i just get further away and at an advantage point where i can see if another hunter approaches,for every one unethical hunter there are ten good one's i think if we want to complain about it we should not hunt cause it won't change nothing or we can join MCC but then again on opening afternoon at the cafe i heard some of them complaining why so and so alway's seem's to get the good property for opener and i thought i would shoot a bird if i paid $3000 well welcome to turkey huntin in ca.
it'll only get worse next season i see it more and more with each season,in reality it's ultimately up to us in the feild sometime's to educate the new turkey hunter's when thing's like this happen's instead of going off of them 90% of the time it's just an accident that someone stumble's upon another one's set-up main thing to remeber is it's public land and as individuals we don't own any of it!
 

CLDhunter

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My gut reaction is that people have a learning curve and are used to hunting in a variety of different manners for different types of game and utilize those tactics because they don't know better-yet. Some in fact still stalk turkeys and are successful even if they "know better". I must admit that I have belly crawled up on a flock and took out a tom. I felt pretty smug about it too knowing how hard it is.

Now running after them...well that's just a total rookie move.

I'm going to go out on a limb and say that for the most part bow hutners are generally more accomplished hunters. That said along with that skill level often times I can detect a little disdain for all the "other guys" who are doing it the "easy" way. Certainly not all bow hunters but enough for it to come to my notice. Not only talking about turkey hunting here.

I kinda get a little of that feeling when reading this article(maybe it's just me?)...who cares if you scouted them for four years and hand fed two of them...they are not yours and yours alone to pursue. I would have to take everything said in the article with a grain of salt...the only thing that concerns me really is the trespassing issue. Like Wingbone said it isn't going to get any less crowded. These folks will(hopefully) learn quite a bit as they hunt and get additional experience. They will learn as we all did. A great example of this is folks often go for years w/o killing thier first tom. OF course unless they are taken by experienced hunters or have access to some good properties that factor often accelerated the "first" harvest. But for the most part us public land hunters hoe the hard ground and it takes quite a few seasons of doing it to learn a few things. I am sure all of us can look back and concur.

So in the interest of my fellow nimrod neophytes here's some simple and seasoned advice. Hopefully a little forethought/education will go a long way toward all of us getting along better out in the woods.

1. Don't stalk turkeys it just generally doesn't work. Often you will find yourself stalking birds that are working other guys set ups and screw it up for both of you. But hey do as you wish until you figure it out on your own if you like the school of hard knocks! You never know sometimes you might get lucky too!

2. Join up with a local NWTF chapter and make some friends. You will get to support a good cause and get good advice from fellow experienced hunters.

3. Be patient and remember that the conventional wisdom is that Gobblers like hens to come to them and first thing in the morning they are often roosting together early in the season. Sooooooo your best chances are going to be between the hours of 10:00 and 2:00 to call a wandering bird in. Speaking from my experience they go silent after fly down and then fire back up later on. Anyone can feel free to disagree.

4. Recognizing the "wisdom" garnered from items 1 and 3, don't go walking around the turkey woods. Your just bumping everything that would have been wandering around and came to you if you just sat down and exercised some patience, caught up on your sleep from getting up early and then called a bird to you.

5. Don't over call...use a watch and call only every 1/2 hour if you are "calling blind ". If you are still you will also get a chance at those birds that come in quietly which is abut 1/2 of them if you see them before they see you shifting in your seat, taking a piss, swatting at bugs, scratching your nose, etc...!

6. Get out and scout out areas early in the morning when birds are sounding off. Generally you will be able to find out if there are birds in the area because they will be vocal. Once you have found birds refer to the other items to help you in your quest.

Any other advice guys that might help the "new guys" from stumbling around the woods?
 

chompot

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Well put.... Everyone is a beginner at one time, and it is only going to get worse as more hunters get involved.
 

socalgobblerhunter

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No complaints here, Ed is a good friend and I have hunted with him numerous times and have called birds in for him. When I told him my story it was just a story, thats it. Yes its public land, but sportsmanship and ethics come into play also when hunting public land. Yes the other guys have every right to be where I am but would you cast your fishing line over some one else when theres plenty of open areas??? The two guys that "stumbled upon" the area where I was used poor hunting technique. Trust me this is not the first time this has happened but is an issue that every one out there should be aware.

Obviously no matter how much I scout for these birds they are not "my birds", I am 100% aware every guy out there with a ca hunting license and a bird stanp is entitled to take any bearded bird that I see while scouting.

The tune-up is a function to help new turkey hunters and to promote the NWTF and turkey hunting so a seasoned pro like your self would probably not find it interesting. Like I said before I'm content on public land but my awsome wife thought it would be great if I got the membership. I have had a hard hunt even on private land but it is all a learning experience. You cant put a price tag on that.

So thats my penny for ya.
 

CLDhunter

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Socalgobblerhunter nice to hear from you, I had no idea it was you who was quoted in the article. Or that you were a member here on the forum. I understand that ethics and sportsmanship come play a vital role in keeping us honest with ourselves and respectful of each other and the game we hunt while in the woods. It was my intention to ferret out some lines of distinction in what might have been unintentional behavior by your fellow turkey hunters. It could be wrong to assume that they are hunting in the manner you describe just because they are unethical or unsportsmanlike. I have in fact had hunters so well camoflauged that I didn't notice them until I had wandered into thier set up before and vice versa. So someone would/could be unfairly chastised if they had no idea you were fishing in the same pond when they "cast their line".

Often I see people maligned when they are doing what they think and feel is perfectly ok especially when they are new to the sport and don't know the "rules" or are just figuring stuff out. It would also be perfectly in-line and probably more productive to communicate with fellow hunters and offer advice and education rather than just turn your back and walk to less crowded pastures? In a sense that is what I am trying to do here but without the personal exposure that you had. I do share your disappointment and frustration with folks walking around. Nothing more disapponting for me than investing four-five-six hours of waiting only to have to all be for naught as people come walking, talking, calling, etc... But even running and gunning a technique utilized by veteran hunters puts you in a position to "stumble on" other fellow hunters?

So the best medicine IMHO is to try and at least give those who might make these mistakes out of ignorance the best advice I can. That not only helps them in the long run but it actually helps me/you by them being better more observant,respectful, ethical hunters. See where I am coming from? Well I can hope anyway?

No one is saying that these two guys used a good technique. In fact my advice to them and anyone else is that they don't do the very things you mentioned. Simply making people aware that there are plenty of people out there doing this and casting them in somewhat of a negative light is probably not the most encouraging method of trying to spread the word or to try and assist where you might with your own efforts.

I would probably find your tune-up interesting as I just like being around fellow hunters swaping information and telling war stories. Unfortunately I am not anywhere near your neck of the woods so I won't be attending anytime that I can see in the near future. I would encourage everyone else to attend and make sure to talk about the things you observed and how everyone can better cooperate when they do run into fellow hunters. Because public land isn't easy to come by and it's only getting more crowded.

If I ever get down your way I will be sure to give you a hollar and I would certainly like to meet up with you and tell some of those stories. Heck you could even give me some lessons on the bow as I'm trying to take my first turkey this year with mine.

My .02 back at ya. Good Luck!
 

socalgobblerhunter

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Hey CLD. Like I said I have no problems helping new hunters. The latter of two hunters knew where I was and so I was a little upset at what they did. So it comes down to respecting other hunters. Like the article said I truely believe in giving people room. If a spot is taken then just move on. I'm not trying to come off as being the guy that bad mouths people but when we all got our hunter safety cards, I believe sportsmanship and respecting other hunters and property was covered more than once so forgetting those rules is not a excuse.

We all will run into those bummed hunts and helping those who do not know will be the greatest acomplishemnt.


If you are ever in this area you be sure to contact me and we'll hook up for a hunt. I'll be more than happy to help you bag a socal gobbler.
 

wingbone_2003

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Gen i understand your feeling's beleive i could not control myself two years ago when someone shot at my gobbler decoy and about peppered me, i lost my temper and it almost got me arrested,so i learn ed to deal with it,trust me i'm not trying to bust your ball's here just trying to ease the tention so us seasoned turkey's don't make a bad decision email me there is some MCC property you need to check out if you already haven't i'll give you detail's!

Frank
 

CLDhunter

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OK, I see, if you have information that makes you believe that these guys knew where you were and exactly what they were doing, its understandable that you would be upset. I really didn't garner that from the initial article. Thanks for adding that bit of information.

Maybe we can hook up in the future. Although who I really want to go bowhunting with is

Ike. HA HA HA!
 

SDhunter2

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I bet a 100 bucks a turkey hunter gets shot before a turkey does.
How many Days left????
 


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