compressed loads

PoorAim

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Am just starting to reload, and started to load my first
round of 300 Savage last night.

I have a question regarding compressed loads. Should
I avoid these as a beginner? Is any squishing of the powder
at all considered compressed?


Last night I started with a START load of 41grains (IMR 4350),
and I was quite nervous/surprised when I found my 165grain
boat tail bullet would have to "squish" the powder a fair amount
before getting to the needed bullet seating depth. I stopped because
it was late (and I was getting tired), but did triple check that I had
only 41 grains. The max. load with this powder (44grns) is listed as
a compressed load in my manual, but not the starting load. Does
this sound right? The powder came up to about the shoulder of the
neck. I would imagine a full 44 grains would be really full and require
a fair amount of compressing!

Should I not worry too much about compressing the powder, or
should I get a different powder that does not require compressed
loads? (at least for starting out).

Thanks for any insight you fellas can give.


-John
 

ricciardelli

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I have loaded IMR-4350 From 39.9 grains to 45.0 grains with no problems. However, I found that IMR-3031 From 30.0 grains to 39.4 grains and Remington 9-1/2 Primer was a better choice.
 

tmoniz

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I use 39 grains of imr 3031 and 130 hornady's and an oal of 2.60

42 grains of w748 and 150 silver tips

38 grains of imr 3031 and 150 sierra spitzers

40 grains imr 4895 and 150 sierra spitzers

39 grains imr 4895 and speer 165 spitzers

In my remington 722 I neck sized only after first firing and my best primer was the winchester 120. And winchester cases.

I always had to full length size in my Remington pump action.
 

subfan

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I was looking for a 165gr. load as well.
 

huntducks

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No problem here shooting compressed loads, I do it all the time.
 

Frank

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Pooraim, that is a perfectly normal reaction especially with new handloaders wondering about the safety of compressed loads.

A quick look at a reloading manual will show many loads with many bullet and caliber combinations as compressed loads. Especially with the slower burning powders (such as 4350).

Nosler 5th edition is an excellent one. It also lists their accuracy (best) loads with any given bullet weight and powder. Sometimes they're even right on (for me). lol Many more times they are not, but is still a great guidline / source.

Manuals will also often show the percentage (%) of the case filled. Some are "over" 100% filled.

While I am on the Nosler Manual bandwagon, I see it lists the 165gr bullet with 39.0grs of IMR 4064 @ approx 2475 fps as their most accurate load. It lists this load at 95% full in a "Winchester" (important) case. Of course the accuracy proof will only be in the pudding.

Happy Shooting
 

MAC

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There is a pretty good article on compressed loads in the current issue of Handloader Magazine. It does a good job of explaining what is an acceptable and unacceptable amount of compression. Definitely worth the effort to get a copy.
 

NoCAL

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If the powder only comes part way up the neck, I woudn't even call it a compressed load! Seriously though, I doubt you could get enough 4350 into a Savage case to do yourself or gun any harm. If you are shooting a 99, you don't want to use max loads too much anyway. Here are some hints for working with max/compressed loads. If you work your way up to the max, watching for pressure signs all the way, and can't seem to get the powder all in, try a drop tube. I bought a set from Forsters and it really helps to settle the powder as it falls in. Another trick is to kind of tap the case as the powder goes in. You can also put your finger over the case mouth and tap the case on your bench. Finally, try pouring the powder in a trickle down one side of the funnel so it kind of spirals into the case. All these things will help to settle the powder lower in the case.

NoCAL
 

PoorAim

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Thanks for all the responses.

I did try the "tapping" and the spiral pour technique and
it did help. I also found out about a drop tube too, but haven't
picked one up yet.

More importantly I got out and shot my first reloads, and
the 99 and I are still in one piece! My results so far are
okay (better than Remington factory ammo in my gun),
but I have picked up some other powders that hopefully
will give more accuracy anyway and these others aren't
compressed, but close to 100% capacity.

I do enjoy reloading so far, but for a newbie,
its slooooow and its going to take a fair amount of
shootin' before for it pays for itself (but it will).
The main reason for taking it up was to be able to try some
different bullets/loads in the ol Savage 99g (300savage),
since the factory selection is VERY limited. Of course now that I have the tools,
I will be rolling for the 270 and 30-06 too.

-PA
 

huntducks

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PA

Good for you, i'll bet you were
a bit on that first shot, try some lighter weight bullets in that 99 like 125 & 130 IMR 4895 & 4320 have done well in my 99 300sav.

If you want a real good practice or just a plinking load use the 100gr speer plinkers there deadly on vermin & jacks along with cans and there cheap too, I use like 43-44grs of 4320 and they run around 3000fps good accuracy and splatter vermin.

Try loading in stages like sizing then trimming and cleaning, then priming everything, then finish loading.
 

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