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Conserving Hunting and Fishing in the Wyoming Range

spectr17

Administrator
Admin
Conserving Hunting and Fishing in the Wyoming Range

10/15/07

Wyoming Senator John Barrasso plans to introduce federal legislation that will prohibit any further oil or gas development within the Wyoming Range. He is reportedly including language in the bill that will remove pristine lands from oil and gas leasing and allow for lease buybacks from willing sellers. This legislation is great news for sportsmen.

However, in order to truly conserve the Wyoming Range for our outdoor enjoyment, the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management need to cancel contested leases covering approximately 44,700 acres on the eastern flanks of the range - leases that were improperly offered for sale in 2005 and 2006. These leases can be legally cancelled and money returned to the gas companies under a ruling by the Interior Board of Land Appeals.

Please take a moment to call, write or e-mail Sen. Barrasso and Undersecretary of Agriculture Mark Rey today to let them know the importance of protecting the Wyoming Range and canceling the contested leases.


Send a letter to the following decision maker(s):
Senator John Barrasso
USDA Under Secretary Mark Rey


Below is the sample letter:


Subject: Conserving Hunting and Fishing in the Wyoming Range

Dear [decision maker name automatically inserted here],

As a sportsman who enjoys the outdoors and values fish and wildlife, I support legislation that would curb energy development and allow for lease buybacks in the Wyoming Range. This region plays a critical role in Wyoming's fish and wildlife populations, as well as the state's economic health and sportsmen's interests.

We need to protect unique places like the Wyoming Range, which is home to three subspecies of native cutthroat trout; outstanding moose, mule deer and elk herds; and unlimited recreational opportunities such as hunting, fishing, horseback riding and camping.

However, in order to truly conserve the Wyoming Range for our outdoor enjoyment, the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management need to cancel contested leases covering approximately 44,700 acres on the eastern flanks of the range - leases that were improperly offered for sale in 2005 and 2006. These leases can be legally cancelled and money returned to the gas companies under a ruli! ng by the Interior Board of Land Appeals.

I respectfully request that you make protecting these 44,700 acres a priority in your conservation agenda. Doing so will protect crucial fish and wildlife habitat and provide social, economic and environmental benefits for all Americans.

Thank you.

Sincerely,


What's At Stake:
From a hunting and fishing perspective, these 44,700 acres of the Wyoming Range are among the most important of any acreage in the range. They comprise critical Colorado River cutthroat trout habitat, as well as ideal elk and mule deer habitat. These areas are also vital for hunting and fishing access to public lands. Because these areas are easily accessed by hunters and anglers, they are extremely popular and used heavily by the outdoor public. Gas production is not compatible with such uses.

The land in question includes large portions of Horse Creek, South Beaver Creek, Dry Beaver Creek, South and North Cottonwood Creeks and North and South Piney Creeks. All of these regions are important wildlife and fisheries habitat, and some areas, such as South Piney Creek, include portions of the historic Oregon Trail.

Responsible oil and gas development is vital to the nation and the state of Wyoming. However, Wyoming has supported and is carrying more than its share of the load of the nation's energy development. The TRCP maintains that certain places in our nation are too valuable to be compromised by poorly planned development. The Wyoming Range is one of those places.

The TRCP works in partnership with Sportsmen for the Wyoming Range to protect the region.

The TRCP's Energy Initiative supports responsible energy development that is balanced with sensible fish and wildlife management.

Join Sportsmen for Responsible Energy Development.


Media Contact:
TRCP [email protected]
 


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