Coyote Attack in San Diego

22 250

Active member
Joined
Nov 11, 2001
Messages
27
Reaction score
0
Caution urged after coyote attack

By Kevin Clerici
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

July 12, 2002

Game wardens went door-to-door yesterday warning homeowners about the dangers of feeding wild animals, a day after a Carlsbad woman and her dog were attacked by a pack of coyotes outside her home near the La Costa Resort & Spa golf course.

Elaine Smith, 36, said she escaped injury because of the heroic efforts of her 95-pound chocolate Labrador, Dakota.

"He saved me," she said. "When he heard me scream after they bit my pant leg, he grabbed one by the neck and slung him away."

Smith said she was walking her dog on Swallow Lane, near El Camino Real, about 10 p.m. Wednesday when eight to 10 coyotes came at her from nearby bushes.

Backing away, Smith tripped on the curb as she tried to control the leashed dog, which was jumping around, agitated by the animals. The coyotes rushed her when she went down, biting at her legs and shredding her sweat pants.

"I have never been afraid of coyotes before because they usually run away," she said, "but these ones came strategically at me from three directions."

"And once I fell, I guess they thought I was lunch meat."

At one point, Dakota – rescued by Smith from the Humane Society 10 years ago – went on two legs, Smith said, fending off the coyotes until she stood up. Then they ran a block home.

Two game wardens from the state Department of Fish and Game responded at 11:40 p.m. and found four coyotes.

Regional Patrol Chief Mervin Hee said one was shot and killed when it demonstrated no fear of the officers.

"We don't relocate coyotes," Hee said. "If the animals show no fear of humans, they are euthanized. If they had run away, they would have been gone and we wouldn't have had an issue with them."

Hee said coyotes rarely bite people and are not normally aggressive unless their behavior has been altered through human contact.

Fish and Game officers believe somebody was illegally feeding the coyotes, trying to domesticate them.

Hee also suspected the coyotes were attracted to the neighborhood by a large number of rabbits that live near the golf course and by people leaving out trash or pet food.

Another confrontation occurred on Sunday in Oceanside. A woman walking her dog was met by an adult coyote on Malta Way near Rancho del Oro. The woman told officers the coyote came within five feet of her. She picked her dog up and started yelling at the coyote, which followed her for a quarter of a mile until it was scared away by two men who saw what was happening.

Yesterday, four game wardens and four senior volunteers scoured both neighborhoods. They talked with more than 180 people trying to assess the scope of the problem and warned homeowners to keep food and pets inside at night.

"This is the first time we've been able to go door-to-door to identify why those animals got in trouble," Hee said. "It bothers us having to kill these animals all the time."

So far this year there have been five recorded attacks in the county with two injuries. Hee said there were 17 confrontations between humans and coyotes last year, resulting in injuries to eight people.

Hee said coyote season begins in late May and early June when the pups are born and the females are more aggressive.

Bill Morrison, security director at La Costa, said there have been no recent sightings of coyotes on the course, adding there are officials on the premises during the day. Wildlife personnel went back to both areas last night to look for any animals that don't show fear.

Smith's neighbors said coyotes are a common sight at the hilltop condominium complex. "They do come up here," said Rosemary Nuñez, 49, who has lived in her condominium for 16 years, "right in the back yard where you were standing."

Her unit overlooks a landscaped area on the edge of a chaparral-covered canyon.

And the coyotes aren't afraid of humans.

Just a few weeks ago, after dinner, she was relaxing on her patio.

"The coyote came all the way up to the fence," she said.

She shined a light on it, but the little coyote didn't flinch, she said, and eventually moved away on its own.

To Nuñez, a Valley Center native who has experience with wildlife, the advice was old hat.

"You're not supposed to feed the animals, because then you're not going to get rid of them," she said.

Of course, some owners may feed the coyotes inadvertently.

"You see signs out by the mailbox," Nuñez said. "Cat missing."
 

tinner

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 12, 2001
Messages
2,210
Reaction score
0
<font face=arial size=1><blockquote><hr noshade size=1>Quote: from 22 250 on 9:11 am on July 12, 2002

"You see signs out by the mailbox," Nuñez said. "Cat missing."

<hr noshade size=1></blockquote></font>
i think that this right here explains most of it. keep your cats inside. not only do they live longer but i dont find their mess in my yard.:mad-fumin-red:
 

22 250

Active member
Joined
Nov 11, 2001
Messages
27
Reaction score
0
That my lucky, this woman just walks down the road and has ten yotes in sling-shot range.  I travel hundreds or miles and spent mucho $$ and only see a two or three at best.  Go figure.
 

LAgunman2K

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2002
Messages
244
Reaction score
0
there must be a lot of coyotes in this area of northern SD county, i got a family friend that lives there in a golf course community, hes seen the yotes in his backyard (on the golf course) and they have tried to lure his dog away, too bad hes not a bow hunter. the Triple S Method applies here (Shoot, Shovel, and Shut up)

(Edited by LAgunman2K at 2:50 am on July 16, 2002)
 

Advertisement



Top Bottom