Crate training question with new Lab puppy.

83blazer

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I have been crate training the puppy since yesterday. If the puppy is sleeping in the crate like right now at 12:40 today should i still wake her up every 30 min. to take outside to relieve herself? She has been sleeping in the crate since 11:30. My kids have tired her out. I know she relieved herself before she came in. What do you guys suggest?

Thank you all for your patience and help. It is very much appreciated it.

Ernesto and family. I am trying to find the cord to post pictures of the pup. I will do so as soon as I can.
 

DRAKE11

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You should wake her up and take her out side. That way she now as soon as she wakes up she needs to go outside. It is hard to sit there and wait for her, she was wake up and go in her crate. It takes a little while but she will catch on quickly. Good Luck.
 

AnewBigDaddyB

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pups or adult dogs "usually" are ready for the "outdoors" so to speak, just as you may be each and every time you awake!

That said, if you're consistent with allowing your new pup the opportunity to get outside upon awakening, as well as after eating, your crate training efforts will be well rewarded!

Kenneling a dog is worth it's weight in gold, which you'll soon learn and come to appreciate!

I've seen folks that "can't" leave their dog out of their sight, that's the dog's sight, otherwise, all hell can break loose?

I've traveled with kenneled dog(s) for thousands of miles, hundreds at a time, and you'd never guess my vehicle was loaded with as many as seven dogs at a time, in my vehicle!

The flip side though, is, some dog(s) just don't want to learn to abide by your desires, and it can easily lead towards "afield" hassles as well as traveling hassles!

I'm a firm believer in kennels, I own multiple, keep one handy in the house, which, I can kennel two simultaneously in, and have traveled with as many a three in a single X-Large kennel, and typically paired two at a time in a large kennel and trekked to all parts unknown in this fashion!

Most areas I've hunted in, the motel owners have no qualms of keeping dog(s) in a room, knowing they're kenneled! Room maids can enter the room to do their chores with no paranoia, etc.

A kennel becomes a dog's "safe haven" so to speak, so, the sooner you train your new pup to learn "his kennel is his house" the better!
 

Cold1nhand

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I am with Anew. The kennel becomes the dogs safe zone. A dog that is used to the kennel will travel better, and will be welcome in more motels. I too feel that kennel/crate training is a must for dog owners. People used to laugh because no matter where my dogs were in the house, anytime you said "kennel" they would head straight for the crate. So keep up with the puppy and best thing to do is wake her up and take her out of the crate outside. She is going to have to go every time she wakes up, and may not be able to hold it if waiting for you to notice she is up. Put her on a schedule and stick to it. Before you know if she will be on it just like clock work!
 

83blazer

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I have another question, if I keep taking the puppy out of the crate every 30 min. while it is in there wont it get used to p'ing (relieveing itself)? For example all afternoon she has been outside playing. At 8 pm we came inside and she went inside her crate. She fell asleep and I have been contemplating waking her up or giving her a 1 hour or 2 to get used to holding it for a while instead of taking her out ever 30 min.

What do you guys think????
 

Dave in LB

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Dogs don't make a habit of messing in their bed so to speak. it may happen from time to time but they are't likely to go where they sleep. emember the kennel is going to be the dogs safe zone/private space so they will try to keep it tiddy. Will there be issues from time to time sure but they will be few and most likely only if the dog is left too long without release. Our dog can stay in a kennel several hours( man I hate it though) and not mess. It will come with time too.
 

Widux

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Evey 30 min seems like a really short time to me--I'd try and let it wake by self and then take it out-- how old is it? Puppy needs lots of sleep -
 

canadagoose

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When I kennel trained my lab, it was day and night. I'd put her in when I went to work in the morning, came back for lunch to let her out and play with her, then put her back in for the afternoon before being let out again after work. Those ended up being 3-4 hour periods, but I felt it was better than leaving her out in the yard unattended as such a small puppy.

During that time, I had to wash a load of wet towels every day for a week or two, but she quickly learned to hold it.

At night, she'd wake up and whine every few hours and I'd take her out to the yard.

One important safety tip: don't set the puppy down on the floor while you unlock the door to put her out. As soon as the feet hit the ground, out comes the pee.


As an adult, she's a pleasure to travel with anywhere. Just bring the kennel along, and put her in it as needed. She's happy as can be. In fact, the first place she wants to go if she gets sick or hurt is into the comforting safety of her kennel.
 

Widux

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We do about same as above with pups--our dogs, for some reason, will not defecate on our lawn--it's great- they go across cattle guard or creek and do their business- makes for a nice. Mow with no crap on lawn-- they travel well-= one watches everything and one goes to sleep imediately upon starting the truck--They will also not mess their kennels-folks at kennel we board them at when necessary have found that amazing but we like it- they wait every am for guy to let them out--
 

Cold1nhand

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (canadagoose @ Apr 23 2008, 11:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
One important safety tip: don't set the puppy down on the floor while you unlock the door to put her out. As soon as the feet hit the ground, out comes the pee.
[/b]

Learned that one the hard way too!

 

AnewBigDaddyB

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lots of good input, bottom line, kennel train all your dogs from this day forward, and you'll and they will be "happy campers"
 

RickQU/DU

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I agree with all of you and the crate is the greatest thing mine was started at 8 weeks and he loves the safe zone and traveling is made easy, Best of luck and let us know how the pup does.
 

83blazer

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Rick, she does really good in the crate. She likes that comfort zone at night. She goes into the crate about 9pm and I take her out at 11pm to relieve. I play with her 10 min. and then she goes right back in the crate by herself. It's funny sometimes she relieves herself at 11pm and when she is done she just goes right back in the house and into her crate. She doesn't even want to play. Then at around 5:00-5:30 I take her out again and she relieves herself. She goes into the crate again right after. I get ready and at around 6:15 I take her out and feed her. She is doing fine.

I took her to the vet yesterday and she is growing steady and has gained 6lbs in 3 weeks. The vet is really impressed with her. He wants her to stay the same the way she is. He told me not change anything in regards to the feeding. I got her 3 parvo shot yesterday and wait 2 weeks and she can come out to play.
 

AnewBigDaddyB

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83b, I knew you'd appreciate the advantages of "crate training"

It'll only get better from here as your pup matures, and the many years ahead that the two of you are going to enjoy!

My current pup, actually she'll be three come August, had some "motion sickness" that made messes in her kennel early on, from either end!, but, this past season, not a one! We hunted the entire upland season, and I paired into a large kennel along with my adult female that will be approaching her "old age" actually, she's in her old age, and the two of them can travel for many a mile without problems now!

Once at my destination, if I choose to go out to dinner, or anything else, I can rest assured, that while I'm gone, just as at home, my dogs will be fine, content, and non-problematic, left in a motel/hotel room in their kennel while away!

Some folks have yet to come to this realization, that, kennel training is "mandatory"?

Other scenarios include being afield, say, it's break time, lunchtime, and you're hunting with a "multi-dog" party, of many breeds at that!

Well, rather than having conflicts among the many "charges" that are only trying to have fun," while the owner's are trying to get their second wind, relax, take a breath, a bite to eat/drink, etc. A kenneled trained dog, is the "only way to go"

I've experienced some of the saddest confrontations while in these exact scenarios! Dog's on leash at their handlers command, dogs loose, etc. and getting into hassles that wouldn't occur if each and every owner kenneled trained their dogs!

While in the field, I have yet to encounter a "major hassle" while hunting with a variety of breeds!
Pointers, retrievers, flushers, etc. I can only account for a few hassles while a bird needed to be retrieved!

That said, was due to the fact, that, none of us, have "perfectly trained" dogs!

So, the "competition" within the "hunting dog party" regardless of breed, is intense! Each and everyone of "our" dogs are out there to provide what our training and their desires aspire to! With due diligence, and positive training/control, multi-breed hunting parties can share many an enjoyable day afield!

I've experienced for over 25 years now, within that, surely, there's been negative moments, but, with the effort of all concerned, fortunately, it's always been minimized, and, that's always been my goal when inviting any unknown to my party!

Bottom line, you're relating success in kennel training, "hats off to you" it's just one of the many "hunting with dogs" social elements necessary to make your days afield what you hope for!

Keep up the good work, and never be shy to ask anything around here!
 

83blazer

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I'm glad you brought this one up. It made me look back to what has happened since then, a reflection of sort. Since then I own 2 now. One for the house and one for the car. When I took the dog to the vet I would just place her in the back of the Tahoe. She was squirming, yelping, whining. A week after we went to Big BEar for the weekend and placed her in the kennel to drop her off at my sisters house to dogsit. I could not believe the difference it made. She didn't even budge. I had to ask my daughter to look back and see what she was doing. After that I went and bought another one.


When we had those record breaking temps. 2 weeks ago she just went in her kennel and was really good. The kennel has been great. I put her in with a toy and she's good.
 

kno

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Here i go with my 2 cents at the risk of chiming in a few months late and a few dollars short. but just in case anyone comes across this in search of info...

I've recently been reintroduced to the fun of crate training a puppy as we picked up a GSP female we named Rylee on Monday. I'm by no means and expert, but from my experience one of the most convenient (important?) things you can do with your dog while crate training (or just plain housebreaking for that matter) is a scheduled feeding and limited controlled access to water. I'm not saying starve or deny water to your dog, but give him/her controlled access and be ready for the inevitable (especially in the early weeks). from my experience, what goes in on schedule, comes out on schedule.

Another thing I've found helpful is to be sure your dogs kennel is appropriately sized. if it's too big pup can do the dirty in one corner and sleep in another. we have done everything from use puppy kennels to putting cinder blocks in an adult sized kennel to using those travel kennels that come with a divider that you can expand as your pup grows.

Otherwise just give pup a chance to relieve every few hours and they should pick it up quickly. At least they don't wear diapers and take 2 years to learn (i have one of those too).

I also agree this a mandatory part of training, well it is if you want to be welcomed with your dog at places dogs may not be normally (i.e. hotels, or maybe more importantly friends and family's homes). Even though I love dogs and working (playing?) with them, if a friend of mine has a dog and i don't know them and they aren't crate trained I tell them to leave them at home.

kno
 

yupurs

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I agree with all the above--- but I'll add that "kennel" is not just the crate.
My Brittany will kennel where I point.
If I point to her bed and say "kennel", she goes to her bed.
If I point to her crate and say "kennel", she goes to her crate.
I leave a crate in the Jeep and when I open the door She will usually jump in the crate without being told. I started her out traveling in the car crate by taking her to the park, or somewhere she can have fun, before I took her to the Vet.
 

83blazer

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I agree yupurs. I carry that crate everywhere. When I go to my mom's house, uncle, park, beach and I kennel her to and from. She lvoes it. Eventually I want her to do what Yupurs say's. She does great in the kennel.
 

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