Cutting a gun stock

Brnsvllyjohn

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First do you cut your rifle gunstock (or any gunstock) to fit you better? If you cut it do you have a gunsmith do it or do you do the work yourself? I do not own a rifle that has not been cut to fit me the way I like it. Two have been done by the gun shop where I purchased them and I have done a couple myself. I am 6' tall and have a 6' arm span but I prefer a 14.25 inches trigger to the back of the recoil pad and most seem to come with 14.5 inch +-. On 2 I have added a better pad and that will usually increase the length a little so they were even longer before being cut. A buddy is setting up a new gun and I encouraged him to look into getting the stock custom fit a little. He never has before and he is way shorter than I am. I also hunt with a couple of guys with wingspans well over 6'6" and they need a little longer length but in my opinion most guys shorter than I am should think about getting the stocks custom fit if possible.

Most of my shotguns have also been cut for me.

I know someone is going to say I need to learn to mount the gun correctly by pushing it forward and then drawing it back into my shoulder. Too old to change now. I also do not like having to strain to get a full field of view in my scope while hunting with heavy clothing.
 

jackman

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Drill out the stock so that if you want to put it back on you can dowel it.
Also unless you have all the tools needed ,Vise,square,Sharp Saw, a good gunsmith or wood worker would probably be your best bet
 

7mallards

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So why doesn't he just have it fit to him rather then go thru all the trouble of cutting it etc??
 

Bubblehide

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I've done it a few times in the distant past to a few shotguns. I have only needed to do it to one rifle. You have much more leeway with a rifle than a shotgun. I want to be able to throw my shotgun up and against my shoulder and be looking straight down the barrel with both sight beads lined up properly without any adjustment. Obviously on a rifle, if you can get this type of fit, you will be way better off. However, getting a rifle or shotgun to fit properly is not nearly as easy as it first sounds. Cutting the stock is often only a part of the process. I can still recall the first time I checked out a Sako, decades back. I threw the gun up and into my shoulder, just like I would a shotgun, and I was amazed, I was looking down the barrel just like I would be with a shotgun that fit perfectly, allowing for instinctive shooting. Sako integrated a cheek piece into their stocks, and in naturally mounting the rifle, it placed my eye exactly where it needed to be.

So, in short, if you need a cheek piece for proper fit, you can always take extra wood away from a stock, but you can't add it without major modification to the stock, likely ruining it's aesthetic. Of course you could try cheek-pads, but they seldom hold position well.

Getting a better fit, by cutting a stock or adding a thicker butt-pad, isn't a bad idea, but if you want the gun to truly fit, it takes more than just cutting or adding a butt pad in most cases. It's part skill, knowledge, ability, and art. If your going to try it yourself, you really should be willing to ruin a few stocks before you get it right.
 

Brnsvllyjohn

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The gun is stainless with a synthetic stock so no real wood to deal with. If it were mine I would do whatever I could to make it fit me. I cannot answer why he has never had one of his guns modified in any way to fit better. Like I said earlier I have had most of my guns altered in one way or another and most before I ever took them home for the first time. Just looking for others input on what they normally do if there is a normal. If it were mine it would go to a gunsmith before I ever hunted with it.
 

Bubblehide

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One last thing. I have a Beretta I shot as a young man that fit me like it was made for me specifically. I was faster than lightning with it, and just couldn't miss. I shot with a group of guys that just got tired of never beating me to a bird, the fit was seriously that good, all instinctive shooting. I still have that shotgun, but damn, I've put on more than a few pounds since those old glory days. The fact is that those glory days are long past. I've filled out, rather nicely I must say (lol). And that shotgun, just doesn't fit me anymore. It's been a long time since I've shot it, but the last time I tried it, I could hit a bird to save my life. I do however, have a shotgun that I do shoot shoot reasonably well. My point here is that if you do decide to go the custom fit route, don't expect it to be a lasting thing.
 

Brnsvllyjohn

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At 65 years old 2 things come to mind. I don't think he is going to grow any more and there are no longer decades of hunting in our futures. I would just make it fit me as best I could but then it is not mine. Resale is also of no concern at this point if the next generation doesn't like the way it fits they can deal with it. I can understand setting it up to shoot it and break it in correctly but "IF" it is a shooter (and I think it will be) then I would go to a little effort to make it fit.
As far as shotguns go a lot of them now come with shims and things to adjust the drop at the comb and that usually helps a lot. I have a couple that seem to fit perfectly and a couple that are not as natural feeling to me.
 


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