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CWA eNews
July 22, 2004

Welcome to eNews, CWA's waterfowl conservation newsletter. If you are
into California's ducks, their habitats, and hunting, CWA is your
organization. Join today!

HELP GET THE WORD ABOUT CWA TO YOUR FRIENDS.
If you know someone who would be interested in receiving eNews, please
forward this edition to them, and encourage them to sign up at
http://www.calwaterfowl.org.

REMEMBER, membership in CWA is critical to our lobbying for your
waterfowling future!
Go to http://www.calwaterfowl.org/Regularmembership.htm to join now.

In this edition:

. CWA "FALL FLIGHT FOCUS" CONVENTION IN CONCORD
. CWA SUMMER INTERN GETS CALLED UP BY NATIONAL GUARD
. CCP FOR SACRAMENTO RIVER NWR AVAILABLE FOR COMMENTS
. WEST NILE VIRUS COULD BE SERIOUS THREAT TO SOME WILDLIFE
. DID YOU KNOW?
. CWA WEB POLL
. UPCOMING EVENTS

****CWA "FALL FLIGHT FOCUS" CONVENTION IN CONCORD****

CWA's annual convention will return to the Concord Hilton on August 21
to present the "Fall Flight Focus." This event is FREE and attendees
will enjoy a series of program- and hunting-related workshops and
seminars as well as interactive exhibits demonstrating CWA's many
effective programs. Come learn about CWA's new Hunting Heritage Wine
Program and taste the 2002 Cabernet Sauvignon.

Four workshops are currently planned, which include: Egg Salvage,
Adaptive Harvest Management, Politics and the Future, and the Problem
with Pintails. Admission is free, and a special room rate has been
reserved for those needing overnight accommodations.

Please join us for this special event from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. For
more information, call (916) 648-1406.

****CWA SUMMER INTERN GETS CALLED UP BY NATIONAL GUARD****


Recently Doug Thomas, a CWA biological technician, was called up by the
National Guard for overseas deployment. Doug, a Woodland resident and
recent UCD graduate, was hired by CWA in April 2004 as field crew leader
for ongoing CREP program evaluations. Doug was also appointed to act as
crew leader this summer at CWA's primary banding station in the Suisun
Marsh. He brought his knowledge, enthusiasm, and dedication to the
forefront. Although Doug's wildlife career and time with CWA has been
interrupted by his obligation to the armed forces, we would like to
thank him for his effort and commitment to both California's waterfowl
and, of course, our country. Upon his return he will be attending
graduate school at UCD to earn his masters degree in Wildlife Biology.
CWA would like to wish Doug and his family well, and we look forward to
working with him again in anticipation of his safe return.

CCP FOR SACRAMENTO RIVER NWR AVAILABLE FOR COMMENTS

The draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) and Environmental
Assessment for the Sacramento River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in
Glenn, Butte, Tehama, and Colusa counties is available for public
review. The comment period will extend until August 20, 2004.

The plan describes three alternatives for managing the refuge over the
next 15 years to conserve native plants and wildlife. The Sacramento
River NWR encompasses approximately 11,000 acres located along 77 miles
of the Sacramento River from Red Bluff to Princeton. The refuge is part
of the Sacramento NWR Complex, which has its headquarters in Willows,
California.

The plan can be obtained electronically at
http://pacific.fws.gov/planning/draft/docs...ocssacriver.htm or
http://sacramentovalleyrefuges.fws.gov. Copies of the document have
been placed in libraries in Tehama, Butte, Colusa, and Glenn counties.
Copies are also available for review during normal business hours at the
following local businesses: Chico Sportsman's Den in Chico, Four Corners
Station in Princeton, Kittle's Outdoor & Sports Company in Colusa,
Scotty's Bar & Grill in Chico, The Tackle Box in Chico, TJ's Ord Store
in Ord Bend, Westside Outdoorsman in Willows, and Woodson Bridge
Mini-Mart & Deli in Corning.

Members of the public are invited to meet with USFWS representatives to
discuss their ideas, suggestions, and concerns regarding the plan from
6:00 to 8:00 pm at the following scheduled open houses:

July 27
Red Bluff Community Center - Rose Room
1500 South Jackson St.

July 29
Colusa Industrial Properties
50 Sunrise Blvd

Comments as well as requests for the plan can be mailed to Jackie
Ferrier, Refuge Planner, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sacramento
National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 752 County Road 99W, Willows,
California, 95988. Comments may also be submitted via electronic mail
to sacramentovalleyrefuges@fws.gov.

****WEST NILE VIRUS COULD BE SERIOUS THREAT TO SOME WILDLIFE****

A report released in late June by wildlife health experts at the
University of California, Davis (UCD), warns that West Nile virus could
pose a serious threat to some species, especially rare and endangered
birds, and encourages officials to broaden existing monitoring efforts
to track the virus's movement in the state.

Prepared by a team led by Walter Boyce, director of the UCD Wildlife
Health Center, at the request of the California Department of Fish and
Game, the report predicts where West Nile virus poses the greatest risk
to wildlife by examining mosquito abundance in relation to bird species
that "amplify" the virus and the location of rare amphibians, reptiles,
birds, and mammals.

Areas of greatest concern are the Central Valley, coastal regions,
western Sierra Nevada, the Salton Sea and the lower Colorado River
basin. However, with the current limited knowledge of West Nile virus,
it's nearly impossible to know which species may be hardest hit.

"Some level of mortality due to West Nile virus will occur in a
substantial number of different bird species in these areas," Boyce
said. "Just which ones we can't say with certainty. There is so much we
don't know about this pathogen. The species that concern us most are
those that have limited distribution overall or a limited population in
areas with high numbers of mosquitoes."

For example, yellow-billed magpies are not listed as threatened or
endangered. However, their distribution is limited to the Central
Valley, an area high in mosquitoes, which puts magpies at risk.
Furthermore, they may be subject to high levels of mortality because
they belong to the highly susceptible family of birds that includes
crows and jays.
Most of the dead birds found to be infected with West Nile virus have
been crows -- nearly 500 already in California this year.

Crows and related birds such as jays, magpies, and ravens as well as
house finches, house sparrows, and ring-billed gulls, are considered
likely amplifying hosts that are key, abundant sources of the virus.
"The ability of West Nile virus to move within a given area is strongly
influenced by the presence of hosts that serve as a source of virus for
mosquitoes," Boyce said. "We may see local 'hotspots' of disease around
areas with large numbers of susceptible hosts, such as crow roosts."

The virus, first detected in mosquitoes near the Salton Sea in July
2003, is expected to move into the northern part of the state this year.
Ten people and four horses have been diagnosed with West Nile virus in
California as of June 29.

Little is known about the impact of West Nile virus on free-ranging
wildlife populations since its introduction to North America in 1999. It
has killed individuals in more than 200 species of native and exotic
birds and 20 species of mammals. The threat to reptiles and amphibians
is not believed to be as great as for birds because the mosquito species
that feed on them rarely feed on birds.

DID YOU KNOW?

There is little relationship between a bird's size and how fast it
flies: hummingbirds and geese can reach approximately the same maximum
speeds.

CWA WEB POLL

Don't forget CWA's Web Poll, located at http://www.calwaterfowl.org.

This month's question, "What issue related to the upcoming waterfowl
season concerns you most?"

Last month's question, "Which 2004-05 season option do you support?

73% -- Reduce the mallard limit but preserve 100 day season
18% -- Agree with CDFG proposal of 86 days, 7 ducks (moderate package)
4% -- None of the Above
3% -- Disagree with CDFG & take the "liberal" package if offered

UPCOMING EVENTS

AUGUST

5 Auto Life Outdoors Sports Show in Modesto, including the
California State Duck and Goose Calling Contests. Call (800) 499-1004 or
visit http://www.autolifeoutdoors.com for details.

6 Hanford CWA Dinner. Steve Silva, (559) 905-8105

6 Galt CWA Dinner. Marlon Strapp, (209) 745-9393

7&8 Women's Hunter Education Training Course at the Yolo Sportsman's
Association in Woodland. Get ready for this fall's hunting season!
Two-day course is only $10. For more information call (916) 791-5535 or
(530) 757-2361. Pre registration is required.

14 Dave Enriquez Memorial Trap Shoot in Livermore. Sandy Peterson,
(925) 606-7351

20 Walnut Creek CWA Dinner. Claude Grillo, (925) 683-1377

21 CWA Convention in Concord. View original duck stamp artwork and
the judging for the 2004-05 CWA Hunting Heritage Stamp. This is a FREE
event at the Concord Hilton. For more information, call (916) 648-1406.

21 San Jacinto Repair/Clean-up Day. Bill Rhinehart,
wrhinehart@earthlink.net

24 Watsonville CWA Dinner. Carolyn Agard, (831) 722-3861

27 CWA Tri-Valley Golf Tourney. Darren Solaro, (925) 443-4868

28 Pomona CWA Dinner. Greg Pedrola, (909) 599-7333

SEPTEMBER

11 Waterfowling Clinic in Williams. 9916) 653-7448 or
http://www.dfg.ca.gov/coned/huntclinics. $40.

For more information about a particular event, email
cwafund@calwaterfowl.org or visit www.calwaterfowl.org.

Thank you for supporting California Waterfowl Association.

If you would like to unsubscribe from CWA eNews, just send a blank email
from the email address with "unsubscribe" in the subject line to
admin@calwaterfowl.org.
 
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