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D11 Bear?

Pumpa

Well-known member
When ever I try to look anything up for CA bear I always end up routed to d14 or up north in the Sierra's. Does anyone attempt to find bears in D11 or is it more ran into a bear while deer hunting lol?

I was up Azusa canyon this afternoon, couldn't find much but what i think was scat. Learned a lot or should I say learned, I dont know a lot today. Any tips or pointers would be appreciated.
In the morning gonna head out to Big Tujunga, never been out that way.
 

Bubblehide

Well-known member
First locate the several areas bears are using. This isn't a ton of work, but it will take an investment in some time. I know, I know, your asking how to do that. Take a drag and a rake with you. Any dirt roads you drive, use the drag behind your truck. Do this every evening and then check it the next morning, first light, for bear tracks, and note exact locations and directions of bear tracks. Try to establish some patterns of movement over time. Okay the rake. Well when you do find some patterns, or tracks on a trail, or just trails you want to check, do the same thing on the trail. you do NOT have to rake the entire trail. Just do some of the soft sections prone to tracks being left. Once you have some travel areas down, you can start to look for feed, water and bedding; you can also employ a few trail cameras. I have a bunch I'd be willing to part with cheap.

Best of luck!
 

Pumpa

Well-known member
How do you guys get on the dirt roads? Everywhere i go everything is locked up pretty good. I did see one guy open and gate and come off a trail first time ive see that.

Id love to take some of those cams but walking a tight budget, Any spare coin at the moment goes to the gas fund of gettinf out to put leg time in.
 
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SoCalB3AST

Well-known member
if ur looking for bear in d11 start spending time in rightwood area, hike in as far as u can go an then glass hillsides...
 

Bubblehide

Well-known member
How do you guys get on the dirt roads? Everywhere i go everything is locked up pretty good. I did see one guy open and gate and come off a trail first time ive see that.

Id love to take some of those cams but walking a tight budget, Any spare coin at the moment goes to the gas fund of gettinf out to put leg time in.

My response was a general response on how to go about hunting bears in a new area, or as a new hunter. Those methods will help you locate bears quickly. Finding the actual bears can be a different story though. So in short, I don't hunt the areas you are looking at, so my guess is the only way to get on those roads is by foot. Anybody that has a key is likely a property owner, utility worker, of forest service employee. So simply take a rake with you, and look for animal trails coming down to the roads you do drive, and stop and rake them when you can. All your doing when you rake them is cleaning them up so you know if any tracks are fresh or not, size, number of animals...
 

Pumpa

Well-known member
40129737_902209613321803_5942671202064531456_n.jpg40137696_469228763555020_595196589354516480_n.jpg40133544_671404853222791_4652315949486047232_n.jpg

Found these today tho, Im pretty sure thats bear scat(please correct me if not trying to learn), and what ever he had for breakfast. I found a stick and poked the pile was still green and mushy on the inside.

I know this is going to sound dumb but im really confused on how people scale some of this terrian in D11, Ive always ready be ready to climp and what not. But when I look at most the terrain I cant see how one would scale it.
 

OPAH

Well-known member
Wrightwood is a much smaller area than most also very steep, but there are bear, Cougar and Bob cat to be had.
First call the wrightwood Ranger station and the lylecreek Ranger station ask about bear sightings and or nusence bears.
this will get you some areas to goggle earth. find the roads that cross the saddles that the bears woul be using to get to where they were sighted and scout the saddles ( from a elevation such a the back bone of either side. I will PM you a area with frequent bear incounters. it is a trek but will worth a hunt or scout.
 

Bankrunner

Well-known member
First locate the several areas bears are using. This isn't a ton of work, but it will take an investment in some time. I know, I know, your asking how to do that. Take a drag and a rake with you. Any dirt roads you drive, use the drag behind your truck. Do this every evening and then check it the next morning, first light, for bear tracks, and note exact locations and directions of bear tracks. Try to establish some patterns of movement over time. Okay the rake. Well when you do find some patterns, or tracks on a trail, or just trails you want to check, do the same thing on the trail. you do NOT have to rake the entire trail. Just do some of the soft sections prone to tracks being left. Once you have some travel areas down, you can start to look for feed, water and bedding; you can also employ a few trail cameras. I have a bunch I'd be willing to part with cheap.

Best of luck!
Nice plan! Here's something that will eliminate drags and rakes and free up some room in the truck. To make a "track trap" on a trail all you need is a branch from a tree or shrub to smooth out a spot on the trail. Iv'e never found the need to clean tracks from a dirt road but you could by dragging some larger branches behind the truck. Or just look for fresh tracks on the road, you'd be surprised how fast fresh tracks (especially bear tracks) disappear on their own in dry conditions.
 

TheGDog

Well-known member
Try to find areas of water that present nice shaded wading pools you could imagine them wanting to bath and lay-down in. They seem to like to take a dip in the mornings, and come back to drink in the PM around last light. If the terrain is soft sometimes just on the other side of obstacles which block a trail... you'll notice a deeper indentation in the soil since they had to climb over the thing and step down after it. You know, them being a heavier critter and all.


Also if you find areas with a lot of choke-cherries, they seem to eat a ton of those. The pits of those cherries are very large so their scats are these large piles with a ton of those pits.
WP_20150725_006.jpg

That looks like maybe a younger bears poop (I'm guessing) since the diameter is not so big. Probably his belly got full after all that eating on that carcass.
WP_20150725_001.jpg

The tracks look like this.
WP_20150725_008 - Copy.jpg

I've also surprised them napping at the feet of sapplings growing alongside a water-way, where the sand is moist and cool.

Also look out for raspberries/blackberries areas. They tend to be near water-way or areas that remain shaded by canopy. They are bear to walk thru though if there isn't a trail cut thru them. Ya gotta push them down with your feet with high steps, and they wanna rip at your clothes.

I've also seen some kinda tree that gives off these green-bean looking bean-pods. It grows nearer to water. You could tell they fed all around that tree from the way the dirt was squished-in around its edge from probably standing on their feet to get at the pods at your shoulder/head height.

Also... make note of places that have shade in the mornings which have new tender shoots of grass... especially if there is dew on it in the mornings!

Grass with dew on it gives you a BIG dead-give-away if they've walked thru there! You'll know it was very recent since the dew melts away each day. You can tell which direction they walked thru it to because of how the dragging of the feet after the steps points.

I've seen huge prints at the top of steep areas which produce nice amounts of acorns during the fall, especially if that flat spot at the top of the steep area may happen to have some tender grass and be kinda out of view and away from your normal hiking paths, and has good shade for most of the morning.
 
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Pumpa

Well-known member
Thanks soo much for all the info guys!! Now I have a better idea of what to look for, I need to do some more research on the diet and where to find the food. Not going to lie I went out blind, wasn't to sure what I was looking for. I had to pull over at 711 once I was off the mountain and spent an hour asking the oracle for answers (google).
 

Pumpa

Well-known member
Looks like bear scat to me.

Scale some of this type of terrain, G-dog has a special method ;-)
I may have a chance to get out for another afternoon, this week between class and work. So Ill snap a picture of said terrain I'm confused on how to traverse. I feel a good story behind this special method lol
 

OPAH

Well-known member
Traverse ?
Like crossing a conyon or scaling a rock cliff with a rope traverse ?
 

Wild1

Well-known member
Forget about looking for food sources, they eat almost anything. Sure, bears like berries, but they need water, and lots of it. Look for lush vegetation, then find the natural spring or small creek - then look for sign but don't linger around too long (scent). After you find water and sign, leave and get out the spotting scope and observe from a distance. Good luck!
 

OPAH

Well-known member
Forget about looking for food sources, they eat almost anything. Sure, bears like berries, but they need water, and lots of it. Look for lush vegetation, then find the natural spring or small creek - then look for sign but don't linger around too long (scent). After you find water and sign, leave and get out the spotting scope and observe from a distance. Good luck!
This is it in a nut shell ! Happy Hunting
 

flytrue

Well-known member
Ditto about the water, though my go-to waterhole has been very quiet lately. The water even cleared enough to see bottom, and that rarely happens. All the other critters are using the hole, but no bears. That can change anytime though.
The only bear action I'm getting is a pear tree all broken down after a bear climbed the 6' wire fence to get to it. They tend to come back after getting a taste. I might catch it coming or going.
 

Pumpa

Well-known member
Traverse was the only word I could think of at the moment. I should have said how do I hike up and down slopes that look almost vertical, Pictures dont really show how steep it was.41705226_766011657123694_1509845497496469504_n.jpg 41709888_295385981047042_6832877309591027712_n.jpg


Thanks for all the tips! I've put much more stock into looking for water than anything else lately. Might actually need to pick up cams I could see where it would be benficial to see what is happening while I can not get out.

I went to a few places, mainly one where I found the scat, found a really nice meadow. I walked a riverbed for about a mile or so, it was bone dry but had great growth. Stupid me thought it a great idea to walk thru it, basically bushwhacked it was soo dam thick. Took me about 5 minuets of being the loudest dam thing in the canyon to realize if anything was there, me plowing thru the thick growth scared anything around. I figure this area will pick up maybe later in the year when some rains hopefully hit. 41731253_269590233673867_2777853425348509696_n.jpg41653800_1094816417360103_4330472592340156416_n.jpg
 
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THE ROMAN ARCHER

Well-known member
On a few hunts where i had too do some very steep terrain i used lightweight collapsible hiking poles they work out pretty good.....tra


Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk
 


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