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D11 Bear?

Wild1

Well-known member
I know right where you're at and I can tell you, every canyon in that area holds a bear. The problem is getting on them, my recommendation: bring a good pair of binos/spotting scope, get up high and glass, glass, glass. If you're bow hunting, it's gonna be tough, if you rifle hunting, and you have a good scope on your rifle, reach out and touch one! Good luck with the pack out!
 

OPAH

Well-known member
Not enough cover to bow hunt bear, but Wild1 has it down.
Get high and glass, if there is a trickle of water running down the canyon
follow the water paying mega attention to the shaded areas
 

dthome

Well-known member
IMHO, the trick is to find an area that is well used, like a trail leading to greenery, berries, or water. You’ll find more than one pile of scat, and the path will be worn. Then, find a place you can sit in mornings and afternoons that overlooks or intercepts that area. And stay put. Just listen. Foraging bears can make a racket. You’ll learn their patterns and habits by listening, and can adjust your strategy. Take it from me, if you hear them in thick brush, it’s pointless to pursue them in the brush. As you’ve learned, you will not be quiet. Also, every encounter where they detect your presence drops the probability of future success. So plan your strategy carefully. And enjoy the chase!
 

Wild1

Well-known member
I agree with some things, and others - not so much. There is plenty of cover to bow hunt there, and the scent/wind is more important anyway! Stay still, with the wind in your favor, and the bear will never know you're there - it's movement that will end your hunt.

Mornings and evenings is right on, as are overlooks, but hearing a bear - probably not, they're the quietest animal in the forest. Concentrate on seeing movement, my guess is you'll never hear one. Good luck!
 

dthome

Well-known member
Wild1, if you’ve never heard bears, then you’re not listening. I’ve lost count of the bears I’ve killed and I’ve heard each one before I’ve seen it.
 

Bankrunner

Well-known member
Pumpa,
It's important to note that Wild and Homes are talking about two different hunting methods. Both of them will work if you put in the time and effort.
Interesting point about listening for bears! Iv'e never heard anyone talk about that before, it sounds like sound advise. Pardon the pun.
Bears walk do around and feed like they own the place, why, because they do. You can hear them.
As far as traversing the area goes, look for the travel routes that the animals use. They live there and have it down pretty good.
I'll politely disagree with Opha in that there is plenty of cover in your photos for up close and personal bow hunting.
 

dthome

Well-known member
I think you hit the nail on the head, Bankrunner. I tend to hunt “small”. That is, I don’t hunt an entire drainage or hillside. I hunt areas that might be 50 square yards in size, literally. I never take optics with me. They aren’t important with how I hunt. The important part is finding areas that are well used. I know something will come my way if I wait. And inevitably, I hear bears ripping up logs, overturning stones, and breaking berry branches before I see them.
 

Wild1

Well-known member
I'm gonna have to stand by what I wrote, bears are the quietest animal in the forest. I've killed a lot of bears, and most I never heard before I saw. They have those pads on their feet for a reason! Also, I bow hunt, so I I'm closer than most hunters, and the most I've ever heard was a small twig break.

Again, you can hope to hear one, but it probably won't happen.
 

dthome

Well-known member
I always find it amusing when people take their personal experience and use it to define what everyone else’s experiences should be. It illuminates the scope of their thinking, and tells you something about character.
 

Bankrunner

Well-known member
If a bear knocks down a dead fall or is turning over logs in the woods does it make a noise?
Everyone has their own experiences to draw from so i have no doubt that Wild has been around quiet bears.
I've never hunted bear but have been around plenty in the field, dare I say I've seen more than your average bear.
Sometimes they make a lot of noise that can be easily heard.
 

baco

Well-known member
Like wild said bears are quiet sit and glass or sit in a bear area and wait. I've had more than a few walk by my stand
 

Wild1

Well-known member
If a bear knocks down a dead fall or is turning over logs in the woods does it make a noise?
Everyone has their own experiences to draw from so i have no doubt that Wild has been around quiet bears.
I've never hunted bear but have been around plenty in the field, dare I say I've seen more than your average bear.
Sometimes they make a lot of noise that can be easily heard.
How does a bear knock down a dead fall....?
 

Bankrunner

Well-known member
Very easily, I'll bet you could even do it. Pick a tree that has insect damage and or rot at the base and give it a push if it doesn't want to fall go find one that does.
The question is, does that and log turning make noise?
Maybe the bear in your area don't turn over logs to get to bugs or break branches to get at choke cherries but to tell a new hunter that he won't hear a bear and to not put listening in his hunting arsenal would be bad advise in my neck of the woods!
 

Wild1

Well-known member
Very easily, I'll bet you could even do it. Pick a tree that has insect damage and or rot at the base and give it a push if it doesn't want to fall go find one that does.
The question is, does that and log turning make noise?
Maybe the bear in your area don't turn over logs to get to bugs or break branches to get at choke cherries but to tell a new hunter that he won't hear a bear and to not put listening in his hunting arsenal would be bad advise in my neck of the woods!
By definition, dead fall has already fallen..!!!! But I understand your lack of reading comprehension, since no where, in any of my posts have I suggested, that any hunter not listen. Listening is important, so is reading correctly.
 

OPAH

Well-known member
Guess it depends on the bears mode or intent, when they are just jumbering along, they don't care about the noise.
When they are stalking or alarmed they can and do have very good stealth modes.
When they are pissed off they are going to show you who is the Biggest Badest bear in the woods.
Hell Ive seen a bear smileing as he scratched his back on a rock.
 

dthome

Well-known member
By definition, dead fall has already fallen..!!!! But I understand your lack of reading comprehension, since no where, in any of my posts have I suggested, that any hunter not listen. Listening is important, so is reading correctly.
Please. It’s obvious that Bankrunner was talking about dead trees that could be pushed over. Why don’t we just skewer him for using the wrong term? And you’ve decided to take such a strong position that bears don’t make noise, it’s logical to infer that it doesn’t pay to listen.
 

Bankrunner

Well-known member
I could respond to your deflection but i won't. Your trying to change the subject while not responding to the point at hand which is....bears can be very noisy and that noise could be used to locate them.
To all other new hunters out their, keep your ears open when your in or near thick bear country, because sometimes you can easily hear them from a distance. It depends on the wind and the terrain but I've heard them from about 100 yards plus when sitting in a deer blind and while scouting. And once from about 300 yards when i was glassing from a granite knob above a mountain lake and the thick cover surrounding it. That one was loud, it sounded like it was knocking down dead falls.
 

Bubblehide

Well-known member
By definition, dead fall has already fallen..!!!! But I understand your lack of reading comprehension, since no where, in any of my posts have I suggested, that any hunter not listen. Listening is important, so is reading correctly.
Wow, talk about picking a fight. Hasn't there been more than enough to go around in the past.
 

Pumpa

Well-known member
Thanks for tips guys. I have heard bears before and yes they can be some loud mountains of flesh, I've also been camping a wake up to find my neighbors food is gone/everywhere, amazing creatures i think of them as fat ninjas ��
Personally I think I need to work on my glassing, i was so dam excited to "be hunting" I forgot about the binos on my chest. The area will be revisited during rifle and I hope to use more if these tips you all laid out. Also think I will rethink archery hunting that area until I can learn to slow down and hunt and not just power my way in and be oblivious to what I'm doing/ missing.

Also I do have a set of poles, just worried about getting down somewhere to learn it's to steep to get back out. Lack of experience is making me nervous but trying to wear out these boots and soak up as much as I can each trip

Sorry for typos and bad grammar using my phone
 


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