% daytime pictures VS. nightime

speed2spare

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For those of you who leave your cameras out for long periods of time. What would you say are the overall percentages of daytime vs. nighttime pictures? And does this change in the fall with rut and the deer needing to eat more over all? I am from the camp that believes the flash has to spook some deer. And run my cameras with the flash off almost all the time. Just curious how many pictures I am missing. And yes, I have also noticed the greatest majority of the big buck pictures posted on here are night pictures.
 



bowhtr1

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90-10 between night and day. I have not seen it scare them off. They may be skidish at first but they become models after awhile. Before I had cams I thought it would scare them off but I have seen the light or should I say they have seen the light.
 

Scorpion210

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I am running about 50-50. Once hunting season gets here it will be 90-10 night to dark.
 

bowhtr1

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Scorpion210 @ Jul 30 2006, 04:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I am running about 50-50. Once hunting season gets here it will be 90-10 night to dark.[/b]
Welcome to the forum Scorpion. You are right, I think now I am about 70-30 but it will be 90-10 come October 1st.
 

bowtechhunter

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I am getting mostly daytime pics now with a few night pics. Same with the other guys it will change durastically during hunting season, at least for the bucks.
 

Bolink654

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90-10 here all the time.
Though I was 95-5 about 3 months ago, last few months they been coming more during the day than before. Wonder if they'll keep it up for another 2+ months? Probably not...
 

AGINGBEAR

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I get about 90 percent day, 10 percent night. I do not leave them out during hunting season except for my 1 year cameras.
 

bob101

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Depends on what you put the camera on. I work for a state agency and we have probably 500+ cameras in the field (each WMA manager buys what he/she wants and so we have like every camera type ever made etc...).

The biologist that put them on well used trails probably end up 50/50 day/night if they are not on a heavily used WMA (IE people hiking and stuff)..the guys who put them on food sources or on the edge of one (a lot of stuff borders private land and guess what 99/100 times the landowners put the biggest food plots/feeders 10 yards from the property line) wind up 90/10 night/day ratio.

I'm not sure how many of the guys are running them year round or just prior to season etc...it's a tool for each manager to use but there's no requirements.

The biggest deer I've seen come thru the office on a camera was later scored at 211 Non typical and that picture was taken at around 2pm on a bright day. He was later killed during season at night by an outlaw.
 

bob101

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Killet @ Jul 31 2006, 08:15 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
bob101, you have much trouble with camera theft?[/b]
I'm just starting to put some of my own out for personal use. I had put some earlier camtrakkers out during the mid to late 90's and never had a problem on public land that wasn't a WMA.

The biologist I've talked to haven't had a problem, but most of the ones that put out a lot of cameras are using it for a census tool in high intesnity/short duration uses so they might put out 100 cameras for 3 days. Many of the WMA's here might get 10 visitors on 15,000 acres all summer long and then the hunts in the fall are draw/limited numbers. Basically it must be low enough of a problem that I haven't heard them mention it.
 

Lan-Lord

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Interesting information bob101. What state do you work for and what kind of information are you gathering with the cams?

Regarding the %night vs day time pics, I wonder how much hunting pressure effects that ratio? There is a wildlife refuge close to where I live, and I can see deer during the daylight hours without much effort. This refuge does not allow hunting (that I know of) and has a reasonable amount of human traffic. (e.g. they are somewhat comfortable with humans at a distance)

Yet, as some of you have mentioned, while hunting in an area with average hunting pressure, I definitely dont see as much daytime traffic. (I dont have a trail cam, this is just my experience)
 

AGINGBEAR

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I hope Bob101 replys again. I am really interested in the questions asked by lan-lord
 

bob101

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State of Texas, but not South Texas where every deer is hand fed and has an ear tag. It's amazing how many deer show up in big buck contest like Muy Grande and Rita Blanca with a hole in the ear....

East Texas...think like Louisiana, Miss, Alabama etc...lotta people on see south Texas brush on TV and don't realize how many diverse areas Texas has. I see your from Houston so you know exactly what I'm talking about. I've seen several "good" deer by any standard including south Texas from public hunting lands in East Texas and the post oak region...but they're generally not released because to post them and say "Hey this 200 inch deer had his picture taken on XXX WMA would mean increased poaching pressure". Producing big bucks on public land is a lot easier than getting people to kill said deer.....

Right now it's up to the biologist on the WMA on how they use it. Some are using it much like a scouting tool to get some reference of what's out there, while on some WMA's they do an intensive survery - high intensity of cameras for a short period to get a deer age structure and doe/buck ratio.

I did some of this back in the mid 90's while in college we would put out 100 or so cameras for 3 days and go back and look thru hundreds of photos trying to differentiate the bucks from does and specifically which buck and which doe to use it as a census tool instead of say spotlight counts.

Personally the biggest deer I've capture with a film camera around '98 was just over 150" and it was taken on National Forest land which is open to hunting and as far as I know that deer was never killed. I got several 140" deer on public land that is under the Annual Hunting permit public land use deal and only one of those deer was killed that I know of and I killed it by running over it returning from a late night DU banquet.......

I know there has been in the past some University work involving cameras and censusing and well as some ongoing work so be on the look out of some research from this sometime in the future.
 

bob101

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Just some more info. We ran some cameras for one week ending yesterday on a WMA in East Texas (public land) that gets virtually no pressure during the offseason other than employees working on the area, we put the cameras on watering holes which I think really skewed our results with it being this dry right now...we're not actually as hot as the rest of the world but it is "normal" hot here of around 100 everyday.

For the week we averaged about 75% of our pictures of deer were in daylight, I think we might have had more pictures in daylight but the cuddebacks we used took no pictures at all from 9:30am to 5pm (because it was too hot I think). The majority of pig pics were taken at night tho. We even got pictures of coyotes during the day drinking and vultures on the water as well. Right now that's the magnet - water.
 

speed2spare

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Thanks for the replies everyone. Bob101......how about you load those 500 cams up and head to Wisconsin for a week? We can do a 4 day "intensive" study of the areas I hunt. How much time would we need to set aside for checking the results of 500 cams? One serious question for you though. Even when you study an area with say 100 cams. How do you ever find them all again? Mark them on a GPS when putting them out?
 

bob101

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (speed2spare @ Aug 5 2006, 01:29 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Thanks for the replies everyone. Bob101......how about you load those 500 cams up and head to Wisconsin for a week? We can do a 4 day "intensive" study of the areas I hunt. How much time would we need to set aside for checking the results of 500 cams? One serious question for you though. Even when you study an area with say 100 cams. How do you ever find them all again? Mark them on a GPS when putting them out?[/b]
I've talked to some guys in the past who share cameras with their buddies in that way. 3-4 guys pool their cameras for 2 week runs or whatever and then move them to their buddies hunting area etc... Just something to think about.

We have nearly 700 cameras but rarely will they all go out on one area. Those are for all our management areas.

When we do a census it's not like putting out cameras for scouting or entertainment. It's like cruising timber or such. They are put out on a grid, and wherever that point falls is where the camera goes - you can't "cherry pick" where to put them or you skew the results.

You can go thru pics from 100 or so cameras over 3 days pretty fast - you get interns to take out all the pig/coyote/bird/empty pics then you sit down with 3-4 guys and go thru them.

We're not trying to get pictures of 100% of the deer or even 20% of the deer. In fact it really doesn't matter what percentage of the deer we get as long as we can determine what percentage of the deer we got with some degree of accuracy. As long as your pretty close you can extend that out to get an age structure and buck:doe ratio which is what we're looking at. Get those two right and the antlers pretty much take care of themselves here where we're at. For the most part any deer at 3-1/2 or older on these few WMA's we're doing will be a keeper for 95% of the public who applies to hunt there. Last year's biggest deer was killed in bow season was 155ish and 4 years ago the all time big deer was killed 211 non-typical. Each year we take probably 5% of the deer away from hunters because they have broken the rules and shot too young a deer and I've seen some awesome young deer that would have been great in one more year.
 

bob101

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If anyone is interested here's a PDF on censusing deer with a camera. This is the first guy I saw doing this while I was in college back when they still made the cameras by hand, the first evolution from the simple event counters.

Gives some examples and the math involved.

http://www.cfr.msstate.edu/fwrc/deer.pdf
 

AGINGBEAR

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That was a really interesting link. Thank you for sharing that with us. I passed it along to several camera friends.
 

Lan-Lord

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good info bob101. feel free to share more of your studys, trailcam uses, and whitetal information
 


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