Dear Abby: Should 4-year-old go hunting with dad?

scottymack

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I only saw one response based on facts, the others were based on opinion. There is nothing wrong with taking your young children hunting My yougest girls have hunted from an early age.

[attachment=51233:girls.jpg]

Abigail is on the left at 8 and has hunted with me for 3 years and this is Elizabeth's first hunt at 4.
 

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spectr17

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Heck yeah, there's frogs to catch, butterflies to watch, birds to listen to, nature is the best teacher out there. Seein pop bag something is a bonus. Helping clean the animal is greatr biology.
 

doghouse95

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I loved the response that we should stalk the game and use archery tackle. The implication is that we should do it as ancient people hunted. They really want to make it sound like that is the only way it was done back then. What is made very obvious by this comment is that the moron who made it has no understanding of hunting past or present.
Those who had to hunt for food only survived by outsmarting the game. Waiting by waterholes or along game trails and ambushing dinner has always been a strong game plan. Hunters had to be smart and use every advantage they had or their families would go hungry.
Maybe some of these folks should be honest with their kids and explain to them where Big Macs come from.
 

Rodney Hood

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I would have to agree with Abby, keep those kids indoors watching TV and playing with there Play Station...what a bunch of Get those kids outdoor and teach them some responsibility and that not all foods come in a can from the grocery store shelves.
 

Gunslingergirl

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I think my favorite bit was the letter from the teacher saying how the bullies always talked about hunting but the quiet, studious kids never did. Talk about generalizations with no basis in fact.
 

D3Lifer

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Gunslingergirl @ Apr 16 2008, 05:14 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I think my favorite bit was the letter from the teacher saying how the bullies always talked about hunting but the quiet, studious kids never did. Talk about generalizations with no basis in fact.[/b]
It really amuses me to hear that. My son falls into the category of the quiet, studious stereotype that you mentioned. I've been taking him out in the woods to scout and hunt since he was a toddler. At 13 yrs old, he is just now acquiring an interest in getting certified and taking the next step in being a hunter. He is already very adept at scouting and finding deer, and has done some great stalks to get within bow range of some real good bucks. He is really hoping to draw a good junior hunt tag this year(so am I
) In my experience with kids, either family or friends, the ones whose parents foster a love for hunting and fishing are more grounded and secure with themselves. To label kids that learn to embrace our personal connection with nature as bullies is total bigotry. Speaking from personal experience with my circle of friends and family, the bond of father/son that is forged in the discipline of being an outdoorsman builds an inner strength in young men that deters the need to bully peers. The folks that I've hunted with throughout my life have never been bullies. Of course we all like to push each others buttons, and be competitive. Thats the nature of men. That is also what we use to strive for improvement, in all aspects of life. I'm afraid that our culture now is so obsessed with sparing hurt feelings, that we are willing to suppress the need in our children to push each other to accel. Worse yet, is that parents who are strict in enforcing the boundaries that they set for their kids are belittled and marginalized by the system. Personally, I don't mind being in that boat. It's better than the alternative of dealing with a child that hasn't learned to get along in the real world(Not reality TV). Sadly, it seems that as our outdoor heritage is dying, so goes all the positive lessons that young people gain from it. I'm just thankful for the people in my life that nourished my love for the outdoors, and hope that my son feels the same about me and my friends when he reflects upon it as a grown man.
 

Common Sense

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Gunslingergirl @ Apr 16 2008, 06:14 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I think my favorite bit was the letter from the teacher saying how the bullies always talked about hunting but the quiet, studious kids never did. Talk about generalizations with no basis in fact.[/b]


My son was always quiet and an honor roll student; but after the bomb dogs got all excited at his truck, the vice-principal would give him a call the day before the dogs came to have him park off campus. (Guess the cops got all excited when they found all the hulls/live ammo/...) Guess the VP was able to convience the police it was okay, but I think my son had to take him dove hunting to make up for all the trouble.
 

tmoniz

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Man I need a shovel for that one.

My boys were not the best students. It was tough raising them.
But to my mind. If I hadn't taken them fishing and hunting and camping.
I'm not quite sure what they would have become.

I used to take them when they were young to some God awful high places.
Hand them some Bino's and explain to them what I was after.
They glassed and glassed til those bino's were almost stuck to their heads.

My oldest has ADD. But my wife remarked that he was learning to focus better just by going with me and sitting on a rock way up and just sitting there for hours at a time.

My youngest told me once that he liked just sitting on a mountain with me and not having to think about anything back home.

Exposing children to any facet of the outdoors is the best gift you could ever give them as a parent.
 

ltdann

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While searching for the original letter, I ended up on a vegitarian website that posted the letter, and the expected responses. It's eye opening to read what the "other side" thinks. But there was one jewel there"

"I agree with Mr. Sun. If the kid is a meat eater, this could help him fill the gap that most people have between what's on their plate and actual animals. Of course, I would probably change my tune if I found out these people are just shooting animals and taking the "trophy" parts and wasting the rest. That's an awful lesson for a young child. I think it is very important for people to understand where their food comes from and the suffering that was necessary to get it there. At least then they can start cultivating respect for these creatures. Plus, I think if you're going to eat meat, hunting is probably the most honorable way to go. The animal had a life of its own, wasn't just "that's what it's there for - food," before it died. Plus, I'm sooooooooo sick of those people who say, "Oh, I could never hurt an animal!" before chomping down a whopper. If you don't have the guts to do it yourself, it's morally repugnant to pay someone else to do it!"

Read the rest of the comments here http://www.veggieboards.com/boards/showthread.php?t=83878

The last post by Willowriver is especially vile.
 


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