Different Types of Hauling Packs - What Style is Best?

mgriffith80

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
413
Reaction score
0
Alright guys, I know this topic goes around from time to time, but I am looking at backpacks to pack out heavy loads (i.e. game) from the back country. My main question is actually about the design of the different types of Hauling type packs. What are the pros and cons to the L.L. Bean pack shown below, with out the shelf but seems to have a really good system for securing the load down vs. the Kelty the has the fixed shelf but doesnt seem like the load would be as secure?

What would be your preferrence? Or what positive/ negative experiences have you had with either style? All input is appreciated.


265101_888_41.jpgL.L. Bean Carry All
0003150_400.jpgKelty Cache Hauler
 



mgriffith80

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
413
Reaction score
0
Thank you for the input, Easy. Do you know of any Dealers in the area that carry this brand? The local Dealer link on the website doesnt show anything.
 

easymoney

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2003
Messages
10,523
Reaction score
102
You're very welcome...
I bought mine on line and they are very nice folks, it is made in America and the price was very good for a specialty type pack.
I do know that if you look around you will find many types, sizes and materials. Some even knock down into a small bag.
I still have one of my old Kelty freighter packs with the shelf and I have cannibalized my Jansport frame to just haul decoys and waterfowl gear, to which I added my own DIY shelf.
Some of these older style packs can be found on ebay, CL or even at garage sales.
 

Where's Bruce?

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
5,786
Reaction score
38
If you're hunting deer you won't have a problem if you debone it. Bubblehide showed me how it's done and it makes hauling a breeze. Now if you're shooting bigger game like elk then a big, balanced pack is everything.
 

mgriffith80

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
413
Reaction score
0
Right on. Thanks, guys. I appreciate all the info.

Bruce, I heard that in California you aren't supposed to leave any part of the deer behind, except the guts. I tried finding it on DFWs site but had no luck. Is there any such law, or was that just a rumor?
 

easymoney

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2003
Messages
10,523
Reaction score
102
mgriff,
I never heard about that rule.
I have boned out all my game for years and packed it out.The only time I don't, is when I am hunting with my buddies who help me haul it back to camp, but even then I never take anything home but bags of meat and the skull with antlers.
 

Where's Bruce?

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
5,786
Reaction score
38
Right on. Thanks, guys. I appreciate all the info.

Bruce, I heard that in California you aren't supposed to leave any part of the deer behind, except the guts. I tried finding it on DFWs site but had no luck. Is there any such law, or was that just a rumor?
Wanton waste is leaving edible meat behind, the rest is food for the yotes, birds and bugs.it disappears amazingly quick too.
 

mgriffith80

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
413
Reaction score
0
mgriff,
I never heard about that rule.
I have boned out all my game for years and packed it out.The only time I don't, is when I am hunting with my buddies who help me haul it back to camp, but even then I never take anything home but bags of meat and the skull with antlers.
Wanton waste is leaving edible meat behind, the rest is food for the yotes, birds and bugs.it disappears amazingly quick too.
Thanks guys. That makes more sense more to me.
 

Bubblehide

Banned
Joined
Aug 3, 2010
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
47
If you're hunting deer you won't have a problem if you debone it. Bubblehide showed me how it's done and it makes hauling a breeze. Now if you're shooting bigger game like elk then a big, balanced pack is everything.
Geez Bruce, if you ever decide to hunt Ca again, that same area is waiting for you.

mgriffith80, if your going to be hauling lots of weight, you really want an external frame pack. There are plenty of brands that work well. But bone-ing the animal out so that your only hauling the meat (and antlers, of course) is key to keeping the haul weight down. If your packing out elk meat, you"ll need to make at least 2 trips.
 

mgriffith80

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
413
Reaction score
0
Thanks, Bubblehide. I appreciate all the help guys. And if you need help filling Bruces spot, I can help pack out the game lol
 

Pro953

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 21, 2010
Messages
316
Reaction score
7
I have a eberlestock X2 its a mid size pack. I have used it a few times for short backpack trips as well. It's well built and is made from quieter materials than most recreational packs. That said I think it is pretty heavy as well. If you are looking for just a hauling pack to just get you game out I think some sort of light external frame is probably best. Some good straps and game bags and you could set yourself up well. On the other hand if you are looking for a good all around pack that can hold all your gear, is easy to hunt in and can help you haul out your quarry. Well then opinions are like ... You know what in that category. Hit some shops REI, bass pro, etc... And try on some different packs even if its a type you are not interested in that model. You will get a feel for what you like and dislike. It's too easy to fall in love with a style without ever trying it on them you buy it and find it does not fit you. Hope this is not too off topic but just my 2 cents.
 

JohnCo

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2011
Messages
885
Reaction score
4
I decided I wanted a pack that could haul a lot of weight, but was still somewhat light. A lot of packs wouldn't fit me, because I'm tall. So I bought the Cabelas II Alaskan Pack and Frame. Weighs under 7 lbs empty. But because it fits me well, it feels like 3 pounds. I won't use it until this summer, but it feels good. And it's camo, so you know it will make me a super good hunter.
 

mgriffith80

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
413
Reaction score
0
And it's camo, so you know it will make me a super good hunter.
Haha this is true...its science!

Thanks, Pro. That's a good idea. Ill have to try some on. Like john, I'm taller (6'4") and I'm sure not all packs will fit me well.
 

zavodizhevsk

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 19, 2013
Messages
207
Reaction score
1
I have both the LL Bean Hunter's Carryall and the Eberlestock X2. I don't yet have meaningful thoughts on the X2, as it arrived a week ago and hasn't seen any action aside from a spot-and-stalk through my living room. I spent two days hunting with the LL Bean pack this season. What sold me on that pack was the price and the weight. 4.5 pounds is a decent weight for a hauler (compared with external frame metal shelf packs), and at $79 bucks with shipping, not a huge hit in the wallet. I've yet to haul meat with this pack, but I've used it in the field and noted some positives and negatives. For the sake of full disclosure, I spot-and-stalk with this pack on my back. A small, cheap black duffel bag (cost me 6 bucks on Ebay) with the basic gear I need in the field is strapped to the frame. I used the pack 5+ miles away from the truck in rather steep terrain, so I tried to go as light as I could while still maintaining hauling ability. Here are my thoughts:

First, the positives. Its inexpensive, low-profile when tightened down, and not too heavy for what it is. It seems sturdy enough to haul as much weight as I can haul for 5+ miles. I tested the general comfort of the pack with a 50 pound bag of sand from Home Depot. It felt like a 50 pound pack. As an aside, I'm an avid backpacker and have some experience hauling heavy packs up steep trails. Personally, 50 lbs is my comfort limit for anything over a mile or two. Some of you may be stronger, but I learned my lesson climbing Mt. Whitney in the winter with a 50 pound pack of mostly unnecessary gear. Weight is pain.

Now, for the negatives:

1) It's not adjustable. I'm 6'0" with a 34" waist. The pack is slightly long for my torso and the hip belt is relatively loose. Because there is no real way to adjust the fit of the pack, it isn't very comfortable under a heavy load. It doesn't hurt or press or sit unevenly. But it does place more weight on my shoulders than a well-fitting pack would. This is ok for a mile or two, but likely painful for a long haul. In the dark. Over uneven terrain. With a rifle in your hands and meat in your pack.
2) The two pockets on the frame are useless. They won't fit a normal bladder or anything else aside from a few sheets of paper. The absence of pockets makes it somewhat frustrating to use, as you have to unbuckle it any time you want to get to whatever you've got in the other bag you have attached to it.
3) It's tall. This isn't unexpected, since it's a hauler and haulers need to rise above your shoulders for the load lifters to work properly. But if you're expecting to use it as a hunting daypack because of its light weight, keep in mind that the frame sticks out above your shoulders and it's tough to sneak under branches when you're constantly getting hung up.

It's obviously not a perfect pack. But it's affordable and sturdy. And it sure beats dragging your animal through a branch-choked canyon.
 

Latest Posts



Top Bottom