Digital hunting

ltdann

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Who takes advantage of digital technology, be it computers, gps or cameras to improve their hunting? If so, what do you do?
 



BackCountryHNTR

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Absolutely! To start, I read and use good info from internet forums like this one, I use a GPS for navigation and to mark sites. I also do "virtual" scouting using mapping software and satellite pictures...I find out that mostly I use these tools in preparation for the hunt.
 

ltdann

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Whewww, I thought it was just me!! I was reluctant to admit it though. When I scout and spot deer I place a waypoint on the GPS. At home I upload the waypoints onto the topo mapping software, convert it 3d imaging so I can plan a hidy hole.

After awhile (several years) I began to notice a significant pattern develop on the maps and began to limit my hunting to high probablity (verfied sighting) areas. Lately I've been transferring alot of the waypoints to google earth which is just an awesome tool to try explain why deer are in a certain area, and how to ambush 'em.

Gotta a buddy that's an IT guy who's doing a project for a hunting lodge in Indiana, the owner wants real time digital streaming video throughout the property so guest's can scout before showing up.

Better living thru technology. And yes, if the cave man had this stuff, he would have used it too.
 

woodsman1977

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www.mapcard.com

I purchase the premium edition, it is great for satelite images in great color, gps coordinates, distance.

it has a free 5 day trial for all those interested in trying it out.

have fun
 

FTTPOW

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I don't know if this counts or not, but I look at GoogleEarth to get a lay of the land and what the surrounding terrain looks like. Not everywhere is in hi definition, but I can travel all over and never leave my chair.
 

BackCountryHNTR

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Itdann, that is a great way to keep records of your hunting areas. After a while you can pattern the animals movement very well.

Now, about the real time video "scouting" option, I'm not so sure man...it kind of takes away from the hunt IMHO, but hey, to each it's own...

I forgot to mention, I also use real time cameras to check the weather or hunting conditions close to the areas I hunt, you cannot see any wildlife there though, LOL

Besides the planing and scouting, I also use a SPOT messenger as an emergency tool and to keep in touch with my family...LOL can you say that I'm gadget-crazy? LOL

 

Saycheese

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I use a digital clock alarm to get my a$$ out of bed before sunrise during the hunting seasons. Does that count? :)
 

ltdann

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (BackCountryHNTR @ May 1 2008, 11:02 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Besides the planing and scouting, I also use a SPOT messenger as an emergency tool and to keep in touch with my family...LOL can you say that I'm gadget-crazy? LOL

[/b]
Those SPOT messengers are the bomb!! If your gonna be off the grid for more than a day, those are a MUST in my book. Extra socks or the SPOT? spot wins everytime.

Agree on the digitial real time cameras. The customer in that case runs one of those high end hunting lodges (7k a weekend) and raise B&C bucks. He caters to the customer with more money than time. Each his own, I guess. Be fun to see whats moving while at home, but not as a tripwire prior to launch.
 

ltdann

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Saycheese @ May 1 2008, 11:05 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I use a digital clock alarm to get my a$$ out of bed before sunrise during the hunting seasons. Does that count? :)[/b]

Works for me, better than the labrador slobbering on your face.
 

Orygun

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Computers
GPS
Range Finder (Has digital readout)
Will likely add a SPOTs as I do a fair amount of solo stuff
 

BelchFire

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (ltdann @ May 1 2008, 03:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Works for me, better than the labrador slobbering on your face.[/b]
I've gotta disagree with you on that one. There's no therapy in the world like a dog licking your face.

I use a GPS, but it's purely for novelty. I hunt the same woods over and over, so I know every fence post, every well and every pine stump on the place. There's no plot of woods in GA big enough to get lost in, so I use the GPS for fun. I peruse a lot of land with Google Maps, but mostly looking for graves. I'm a technology nut, and love to cross reference as much as I can between the GPS, MapSource, and Google Maps.

But I LOVE my paper maps too.
 

bn2hunt

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I use a GPS, digital trail cameras, and the internet. I have the whole state of Iowa downloaded from teraserve using usaphotomaps. I also use a digital camera that I Carry with me when I am scouting or setting stands.
 

Bullfrog 31581

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Google Earth paired with a GPS has got to be the best scouting tool in the world. Using Google Earth before a scouting trip saves me hours of random walking. It allows me to key in just on the areas with the terrain I'm looking for. When actually in the woods, marking points of reference and my path with the GPS and then being able to actually look at them back home on the map goes a long way in helping learn an a new area in much less time than what it takes to learn an area through blind walking alone.

Text messaging on a cell phone is also the bomb for hunting.

Finally, the internet is THE source for weather, moon phase/location, and wind direction. I plan where I am going to sit almost exclusively by info I get the night before off the net.
 

scottymack

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I use my GPS with National Geo Maps. I upload waypoints and tracks to it then print out a few maps on waterproof paper for me then leave a copy with my wife.

The reason I like Nat Geo is you can get a 3-D lay of the land.
 

ltdann

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (scottymack @ May 1 2008, 07:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I use my GPS with National Geo Maps. I upload waypoints and tracks to it then print out a few maps on waterproof paper for me then leave a copy with my wife.

The reason I like Nat Geo is you can get a 3-D lay of the land.[/b]
Where do you get the waterproof paper at?
 

BelchFire

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (ltdann @ May 2 2008, 11:23 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (BelchFire @ May 1 2008, 04:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I peruse a lot of land with Google Maps, but mostly looking for graves.[/b]

I'll bite, graves?
[/b][/quote]
Yep, graves. Literally. You can't really see the individual graves, but sometimes you can identify a medium sized cemetery if there's not a lot of tree cover. Roads, and other such features are often easier to see in an aerial view than on the ground. Of course, you have to know where to look ahead of time or it's futile. I've found the graves of 75 of my direct ancestors and I've visited 54 of them. It's a fun hobby when you start to have some success. And the neat thing about it is, it's very casual; you look when you have time, or you happen to be traveling in a new area. They don't move around much; that's for sure!
 

ltdann

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (BelchFire @ May 2 2008, 09:39 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (ltdann @ May 2 2008, 11:23 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (BelchFire @ May 1 2008, 04:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I peruse a lot of land with Google Maps, but mostly looking for graves.[/b]

I'll bite, graves?
[/b][/quote]
Yep, graves. Literally. You can't really see the individual graves, but sometimes you can identify a medium sized cemetery if there's not a lot of tree cover. Roads, and other such features are often easier to see in an aerial view than on the ground. Of course, you have to know where to look ahead of time or it's futile. I've found the graves of 75 of my direct ancestors and I've visited 54 of them. It's a fun hobby when you start to have some success. And the neat thing about it is, it's very casual; you look when you have time, or you happen to be traveling in a new area. They don't move around much; that's for sure!
[/b][/quote]

Well belch, I happy that your deceased ancestors aren't moving around much. The alternative would cause me to scratch Georgia off my list of "places to hunt" and move it to the "thats just weird" list.
 

Speckmisser

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Dan, GA still belongs on the "That's just weird" list, but it's also a great place to hunt.

I use GPS a good bit, mostly for marking hotspots, but also for marking a return route to the truck or camp. I seldom really need that landmark, but when I do, it's sure nice to have.

I haven't done much with trail cams, although we do use them up at Coon Camp Springs to see what the deer are up to. If I had more access to private land close to home, I'd probably use trail cams there as well.
 


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