Does the weather push black-tails more than mulies?

JaegerMeister

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Dear All,

As a new hunter of Columbian Black-Tailed deer on the west side of the valley, I'm really excited and am trying to fill many unanswered questions. One of the ongoing debates that I've listened to is the arguement if that black-tails are pushed to lower elevations easier than mulies. Is it gonna take a snow storm to push them or do they drop from fall's first heavy rain/ first freeze?

Also, it seems that deer actually rut during the hunting season earlier in the coastal mountains. How does this change the dynamics of hunting? What are your stratagies during the rut/ when does it usually occur... Same time every year, is it weather dependant...?

Thanks again,

JaegerMeister
 
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mk20rockeye

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When that first rain storm hits the area, I hit the hills. Last year I was in D3 and bagged two in the two rainstorms of the season. It really breaks them out of the brush and into the timber. Last year, I saw more deer in the first storm of the season than I did all season long and actually missed one before I got my first one of the season. It usually takes the first good freeze/snow storm to drive down the blacktails. At least that is my opinion, you will hear others. Take them all and form your own opinion. It took a few years worth of hunting seasons in D3 before I bagged anything there.

Good luck this season
 

Live2hunt

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When it rain or snow, drop everything, call in sick at work, and go deer hunting.
 

Rampage1

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Those guys hit the nail on the head. When it rains, drop everything and hit the hills.
Another thing to keep in mind is food availabilty, if the acorns start dropping down low, the deer may start heading down regardless of weather.

A zone bucks do start rutting much earlier than other areas. But, A zone is a huge area.Last year, I was hunting in southern a zone and the bucks where going full bore the first week of september. I have friends who where hunting northern a zone, and didn't see any sign of rut activity until after the season closed. If you do happen to hit some rut activity the best advice I've ever gotten is to hunt all day and cover as much ground as possible, either with glass or your boots. They cruise around so much looking for does, there is no telling when/where the bucks will show up.
 

ORElkBow

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That's what I hear from a lot of Cal hunters that the first rain or so gets the deers to go nuts. I wish in OR could be that way. But here in OR, rain is just another day for the deers. They do move around more to find the heaviest cover when it's heavy pouring though.

I believe the weather plays the role of the rut, but the snow doesn't drive them down until knee deep. But one thing for sure is once the vibration on the ground from diesel trucks starts trembling, then they know it's time to hit the farms.
 

BrandonA

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That's what I hear from a lot of Cal hunters that the first rain or so gets the deers to go nuts. I wish in OR could be that way. But here in OR, rain is just another day for the deers. They do move around more to find the heaviest cover when it's heavy pouring though.

I believe the weather plays the role of the rut, but the snow doesn't drive them down until knee deep. But one thing for sure is once the vibration on the ground from diesel trucks starts trembling, then they know it's time to hit the farms.
The main difference here is the first big storm pushes all the deer off the higher elevations because they don't want to get trapped in snow storm.... It triggers their migration basically to the lower elevations for pre-rut... As for the original question, I highly doubt it because most 'Blacktails' that are in those higher elevations are hybrids anyways... You'll see smaller deer get pushed out first (small bucks and does) and the bigger bucks will take their time because the snow doesn't bother them as much
 
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