Eurasian collared dove

Rocksteady1

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Any but got tips on where or how to spot them now that mourning dove season is over? I want to get some dove but don't want to accidentally shoot the wrong one.
 



Fishgunner

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This is a good question because I have trouble with this too. The smaller mourning dove has a gray back with spots along the wings. Eurasians are larger and have a black "collar" on the rear of their neck. Their call is different than a mourning dove too. The Eurasian has a 3 note coo that goes "coo-coo-coo", with accent on the second note. The mourning dove has more notes to it's coo with a long, high accent starting on the first note "cooooo-coo-coo-coo-coo". However, spotting them on the wing takes a little more confidence that I often have a hard time with. I can only tell them apart if I can get my binos on them or hear them, identifying them on the wing is a bit more tricky. In general Eurasion are larger and lighter colored.
 
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solus

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Euroasian doves have a squared tipped tail while flying and a white stripe across it. Morning doves have a pointed tail while flying. White winged doves have a white wing obviously. I wouldnt hunt them at dusk or dawn because you wont be able to judge them that well. Look up on google if you want a clearer picture of what im talking about.
 

Limited Out

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All the above is good info. The tail is more pointed and sleek on the mourning doves with the Euros having a more boxie squared off tail, generally lighter in color than mourning doves, with some almost white. The Euro is a little more bulky in body size and a touch slower in flight, not as sleek in flight as a mourning dove. I don't know much about the calling. They like to have some type of structures in their general area. A few days in the field and you should be able to ID the different types of doves. The rule I use is don't shoot if your're not sure. What's one more dove in the bag when you consider the impact on the next season's mourning dove population. Scouting and preparation is the key to successful dove hunting, as with most hunting. When you get into them have lots of ammo. Mighty Fun!!
 

Fishgunner

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Good advice. No sense getting a ticket over a tiny mourning dove. Another good pointer is that doves generally don't intermingle (generally, there are exceptions). If you know one bird is a Eurasian chances are the whole flock is Eurasian, same with mourning doves- "Birds of a feather..." as they say.

All the above is good info. The tail is more pointed and sleek on the mourning doves with the Euros having a more boxie squared off tail, generally lighter in color than mourning doves, with some almost white. The Euro is a little more bulky in body size and a touch slower in flight, not as sleek in flight as a mourning dove. I don't know much about the calling. They like to have some type of structures in their general area. A few days in the field and you should be able to ID the different types of doves. The rule I use is don't shoot if your're not sure. What's one more dove in the bag when you consider the impact on the next season's mourning dove population. Scouting and preparation is the key to successful dove hunting, as with most hunting. When you get into them have lots of ammo. Mighty Fun!!
 

solus

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Good advice. No sense getting a ticket over a tiny mourning dove. Another good pointer is that doves generally don't intermingle (generally, there are exceptions). If you know one bird is a Eurasian chances are the whole flock is Eurasian, same with mourning doves- "Birds of a feather..." as they say.
This is actually not true. This year while hunting the opener we seen many mixed flocks of birds. We seen pigeons with euros and white wings mixed in. We would also find euros with mornings mixed in. Luckily it was open for all of those so we shot whichever we could.
 

Varmint Cong

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I think its getting more difficult to tell them apart and I wonder if there's interbreeding going on. When they first appeared in AZ and CA, they seemed so big and light colored they almost "glowed". You could tell them apart from mournings from two hundred plus yards away. For the most part this is still true but last year my group and I had difficulty positively identifying some of them in hand even after they were shot.

Also, the ones I've heard don't sound anything like other doves. More of a caww/screech than a coo.
 

Fishgunner

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That's why I wrote *generally twice. It is not a constant rule as the only time I have even seen white-wing they are mixed in with either Eurasians or mourning. And, of course, we have all seen dove feeding with pigeon. It's a rule thumb, not an iron-clad law of the jungle. However, like any migratory bird, the species do show a bias for flocking with their own. You can't set your watch to it but it helps to know when looking for birds. In short if you can spot a Eurasian chances are he'll have at least a few other eurasians near by and will likely flock with them.
Few week ago I went dove hunting near palm desert and a big flock of eurasions and mourning were working a gully I was hunting. They started as one flock and as they moved and fed the eurasians broke off into their own little sub-flock until the 2 species became totally seperated. I have seen similar behavior from dove near riverside, IV and inner city locations. So if you have a mixed flock- try to break them up, they will often regroup with only the same species. This is helpful when targeting only Eurasians year-round.

This is actually not true. This year while hunting the opener we seen many mixed flocks of birds. We seen pigeons with euros and white wings mixed in. We would also find euros with mornings mixed in. Luckily it was open for all of those so we shot whichever we could.
 
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Rocksteady1

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I think I will have to stick to quail until the end of January at least. It's going to be tough to spot the euros either way. Best to not waste an outing on an unknown.
 

Marty

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MD's dart as they fly by using a quick wing beat. ECD's have a steady wing beat and do not tend to dart.
In a roost, the ECD's have a raspy tone to their 'coo' which rises and falls.
 

Sparky of SoCal

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I know there is no set rule for this but I could be crazy but it seems to me that at dawn the morning dove do as their name implies leave the roost first. Then the white wing and quickly after that the euros. After about an hour past sunup it is mixed bag. I do agree when the euros first showed up they seemed to stand out more. Maybe they are simply adapting to the local color more than interbreeding.


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Limited Out

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I find them all mixed together whenever I hunt, some areas have more of a concentration of one species than others. Sometimes it 90% Euros and 10% mournings and whitewings, sometimes it is just the opposite 90% mournings and 10% Euros. Sometimes an area is just loaded with birds, 3 weeks later nothing. It pays to have a Plan B, C, D.
 
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whataboutbob

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Euros seem to fly more like a pigeon, like Marty said they have a more steady wing beat than morning doves. If you can find a feed lot in the Imperial Valley and just observe the doves, euros and pigeons together you will soon see the difference. I also see more euros intermingled with pigeons from what I've experienced.
 

Wolfe

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I just shoot the pigeons and leave the doves for in season times. We went through 400 rounds in 2 hours last Friday on the pigeons. I wonder why people go to Argentina when there is some great high volume shooting so close to home. Good luck
 

mallardslayer82

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Looks like a light grey-white pigeon flying. It's easy to identify just like everyone said already. Year round can't wait.
 

DaddyOK

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Also, the ones I've heard don't sound anything like other doves. More of a caww/screech than a coo.[/QUOTE]

That's how I heard them too.
 

PoorRichRichard

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. Also, the ones I've heard don't sound anything like other doves. More of a caww/screech than a coo.
That's how I heard them too.
ECDs have two distinct calls. One is the more traditional cooing sound similar to the sounds made by both mourning and white wing dove, and the other call ECDs make is a harsh almost squawking like sound. I've only ever heard them make the harsher sounding call as they are about to land near me in a tree. I'm no fan of the Audubon Society, but this link provides some very good recording of both calls made by ECDs, as well as a recording of their wing flapping sounds:

http://birds.audubon.org/birds/eurasian-collared-dove
 
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