Fire Restrictions may impact deer hunters in SoCal

Kentuck

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 19, 2001
Messages
3,639
Reaction score
30
News Release: For Immediate Release
July 30, 2004
Fire Restrictions Implemented on Southern California Forests May Impact Deer Hunters
Contact:
Craig Stowers, DFG Deer Program Coordinator, (916) 445-3553

The U.S. Forest Service has implemented fire restrictions on the San Bernardino National Forest, and is considering similar actions for the Angeles, Cleveland, and Los Padres National Forests. The California Department of Fish and Game (DFG) has announced that these restrictions may impact deer hunters with tags for zones D11, D13, D14, D15, D16, and D19. Additional and Area-specific Archery Hunts within these zones may also be impacted.

Refunds for unused deer tags (for zones A, B, C, D, AO#1, and AO#2), bear, antelope, elk, and bighorn sheep tags may only be requested prior to the opening of the earliest season for which the tag is valid. Deer tags for X zones, Additional Hunts, and Area-specific Archery Hunt tags are non-refundable and non-exchangeable. Zones A, B, C, D, and archery-only tags may be exchanged if the following conditions are met: 1) the earliest season for the tag being exchanged has not yet opened; 2) tags are still available for the zone or hunt requested; and, 3) payment of a nonrefundable $6.50 exchange tag processing fee.

The DFG is recommending that hunters seriously consider the consequences of requesting refunds. Moisture conditions could change at any time, allowing the reopening of the forests in time for a portion of the season to occur. Additionally, funding for deer management activities which result in the establishment and implementation of future deer seasons and quotas may be negatively impacted if too many tag refund requests are received by DFG.

Hunters with M6, M7, J11, J13, J14, A31 and A32 tags, which open later in the season, are encouraged to keep their tags in anticipation of a change in the weather which could lead to the lifting of the fire restrictions being considered or currently in effect.

For further information regarding the status of the fire restrictions please contact the Forest Service direct at the following numbers:

Angeles National Forest: (626) 574-1613
Cleveland National Forest: (919) 674-2901
Los Padres National Forest: (805) 968-6640
San Bernardino National Forest: (858) 382-2637

Information regarding the status of these restrictions is also located on DFG’s website at http://www.dfg.ca.gov/hunting/deer/fireinfo.htm. Links to the individual U.S. Forest Service websites are also provided at this location.

###

Back to News Release Index
 

Backcountry

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 21, 2003
Messages
4,135
Reaction score
1
Originally posted by Kentuck@Aug 2 2004, 02:25 PM
Additionally, funding for deer management activities which result in the establishment and implementation of future deer seasons and quotas may be negatively impacted if too many tag refund requests are received by DFG.
Oh boo-hoo!


The forests wouldn't be so screwed up, burning, and closed if the government would manange them better with the money they already have. Earth to liberals... you gotta partner up with the timber industry, a true "renewable resource", as the current "hands off / save every tree" method of forest and grassland management ends up leaving everyone with a big charred pile of nothing. I realize that I'm criticizing the DOI/USFS/tree-huggers and it's the DFG that has their hand out begging in the above quote, but they are almost as much to blame for not leaning on the USFS to better manage the land that the game animals inhabit.

Backcountry
 

JDC

Banned
Joined
Apr 3, 2002
Messages
4,198
Reaction score
1
Backcountry-

For the most part I agree with you. But- (there's always a but) I have been doing a lot of reading trying to figure out why the USFS went from a pretty self suffiecient agency, that did a pretty darn good job of managing U.S. Taxpayer Property- to the pathetic prune of their former selves.

Other than a few bad apples in the cart, I'm pretty inclined to say that it's not the fault of the USFS, it's the fault of the freaks, tree huggers, enviromentalists, Sierra Club, and basically a bunch of blow hards with nothing better to do that $%@# up a good thing.

The USFS was able to manage our lands very well back in the days where they were allowed to determine what areas and lands could be grazed, by what animals. What sections of timber were too old to be productive, and were a big problem waiting to happen. They made a ton of money off the revenue from timber sales and land use (lease) agreements. Our forests were healthy, our wildlife far more abundant etc..

Along comes the freaks, liberals, tree huggers, Sierra Club, morons, degenerates, hippies, grunges, and blowhards. They made enough noise that our liberal media payed attention, which raised the eybrows of elected officials, and the domino effect happened --- all right into the crapper.

I beleive it was 70% of all the timber that was in the area the big fire started in Arizona last year had been requested by the USFS for 3 years prior to be cut and sold. The freaks kept blocking the sale with court injunctions. Finally they were set to start cutting. The area in which the fire started was the area that had been slated as the starting point for the logging, which was to begin somewhere around 10 days AFTER the fire started.

So, I am in the belief that if we can beeotch slap the problem children, and let the USFS do their job without interference, in 15 years our forests will be a nice place for our children to go play again.

I was also under the impression at one point that the DFG was doing some goofy things with our deer herds. The more I have investigated it, the more I have come to realize that they, like the USFS have thier hands tied in a lot of aspects. One of which is doe to buck ratios. I found out that the DFG has to go before a county board with recommendations for the upcoming years hunt, and make a recommendation for # of tags based off of proir years success ratios, and whether they recommend doe tags and how many. I have wondered why D-16 has doe tags available and either sex archery hunts, but D-19 doesn't. It would appear that the county board for S.D area does not have as many liberal freaks on it as the Riverside board. Therefore, until we get people who have no clue about wildlife management to get their noses out of where they don't belong, the DFG will walk around like a hobbled agency.

sucks doesn't it?
 

Backcountry

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 21, 2003
Messages
4,135
Reaction score
1
JDC,

You're absolutely right that I over simplified the issue... but bottom line, with even more detail you came to the same conclusion that folks that really have no clue about how ecosystems work are in charge of policy decisions. Who are these folks? Politicians for the most part. Why do they make the decisions they do? For political reasons, to please their liberal constituents with feel-good band-aid legislation... oh, those constituents, by-and-large, wouldn't know a deer from an elk from a hole in the ground if they were all right in front of them.

Nice analysis.

Backcountry
 

YORT40

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2003
Messages
1,216
Reaction score
2
From resent experiences, I believe JDC has the right conclusions. As a two term county suprvisor, my father spent many hours listening to the Sierra Club & Friends of the West members trying to push their agendas. As I understand it, special interest groups need to get the local government to vote & pass a recommendation for some type of action. With that, the group will go to the next level of government and hand deliver the paper work is start pushing with the county backing. These people are loud & irritating. My father got calls at all hours & many letters of harassment for voting against the Sierra Club on road closures & new wilderness boundaries. On one occasion, he had lunch with a local group who was trying to convince the supervisors that trees are a living, growing being which were here long before humans, and we should do everything possible to save their lives. This is one of those cases where these people are trying to make crap run up hill.
 

Latest Posts

Top Bottom