First bow purchase, ever

camo snob

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I have been hunting most all my life and have until recently never had any desire to bow hunt, the other day it hit me. So, I am in the market for a moderately priced bow. I know very little about bows and how to shoot them so any advice is appreciated.

What do you recommend and why?

Thanks!!
 



One Track

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Camo: Once you get started, you'll never put it down. So, I have two suggestions. First, if you buy a moderately priced bow, you will want to upgrade in a few short months. (Assuming all you want to do is hunt, like most of us.) Therefore, bite the bullet and get a top of the line bow. Secondly, almost any top of the line bows these days are awesome. I'd recommend a PSE Vengeance. That's what I shoot and I love it. I would put it up against all other bows. What's better about the PSE is the price. For Matthews, Hoyt and BowTech, you'll spend an extra one or two hundred for marketing. Good luck in you quest. Shoot a few before you buy one.
 

MULIES4EVER

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DEFINATLY SHOOT A FEW. I BOUGHT AN ECONOMY BOW WHEN I GOT INTO IT BECAUSE I DIDNT WANT TO FORK OUT THE BIG MONEY. THEN I REALIZED I LOVED IT FAR MORE THAN I WOULD EVER KNOW. IN 2004 I UPGRADED TO THE MATHEWS OUTBACK AND WILL NEVER BE DISAPPOINTED. TRUTH IS YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR.

MULIES
 

dbuckslayer

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I bought a bow about 2 years ago and I love it. I am waiting for the opener of the B-Zone to try my luck. I went with a Hoyt Pro Tec. It was fairly expensive, but not as much as a Mattews which I could not afford at the time. I have had no problems so far; it shoot dead accurate every time, very consistant, and it is smooth and quiet. I have a friend with a Matthews which are also very good bows if you can afford the investment. Also, it pays to invest in quality accessories ie. sights, rest, quiver, arrows, release; these will all add a few more hundreds to the final price. My advice is to get the best quality bow that you can afford and also pick out each accessory to fit your perceived hunting situation. When I think of top makers, Hoyt and Matthews come to mind first, but others can be very effective if you put in the time to learn to shoot well. Biggest advice: Dont buy an introductory bow because like the last post said, you are going to get hooked and want a permanent, top of the line bow. Spend the money to last.
 

Witty

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Hi,

I shoot a Hoyt CyberTec... an '02 model (I think). I upgraded the cams to the "Cam & 1/2" system, (since they weren't available until the year after I bought my bow). WOW, that sure was worth it. Really, it's like a whole new bow. But anyway...

I think these guys are right. You'd be better off buying a NICE bow now. Chances are, if you already LOVE hunting, bowhunting is going to change your life. Seriously. I've only been at it for 4-5 years now, but consider myself a bowhunter first (even though I still love gun hunting).

My first bow was an inexpensive, older-model bow. I killed a deer with it, everything was fine. But, once I tried out a newer, better technology (higher-priced) bow, I had to have it. They're more comfortable, easier to shoot etc. That's not to say you can't be happy and hunt just as well with an economy bow, but you're guaranteed to with a top-of-the-line model. So upgrade now, because it's gonna happen anyway.

You're going to get a million recommendations as far as brands go. But definitely shoot some if you can. Walk away, come back another day and shoot 'em again. Then maybe decide what to buy. Do it again if you have to.

Good luck, welcome and congratulations.


-Witty
 

Orso

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If it were me and I was going to buy a MODERN compound bow, I'd buy either a new medium priced bow or a used high end bow. Heck, you might be able to buy an older one from someone here on JHO. There's a lot of things that are going to happen at first, I'd reccommend buying a bow that you can set the poundage to 50-60 lbs, this will help you build the correct form. You need to learn back tension and a 60 lb bow might be too much at first. There's different type of rests, releases, sights...and if you go and drop $1400 on a new setup only to find that you like a different bow, or arra rest or ???? then you'll be spending more money.... Buy a cheap bow first, even if you only use it for 6mos.

I went and dropped big bucks on a Matthews only to realize I liked Hoyt better....

However, being totally honest... I don't shoot compounds any more. I shoot a Longbow. 58lb, 64"ntn and it weighs about 1-3/4lbs. I prefer the simple stick and string...

Good luck on what ever you choose.

Edited to say... A cheap bow will kill a deer, pig, or ELK just aa sure as an expensive bow will... You need to become profiecient with the weapon you own.
 

SDHNTR

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Just shoot a lot of makes and models and decide fore yourself. Don't fall victim to marketing pressure that might lead you to believe one is always better than another. And don't let a bow shop push a particular model on you for the same reasons. So much depends on feel and that can only be determined by the guy holding the bow, not what someone tells you. I shoot a Matthews Switchback. Not because of any hype but because it just felt right. I like a bow that is dead in my hand. I'm very sensitive to hand shock. I tried other bows that are definitely top shelf, but the hand shock turned me off. I'm very satisfied with my decision.
 

3D4ME

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Cammo;

Take you drive to Buck and Bass in Anderson and shoot a few before you deicide what you want. They carry Matthews and I think they have PSE also. But they have an indoor range you can try them out on. Last time I was over there they had a few on used bows consignment you could test drive. J&S in Easley has Matthews and PSE but they do not have a range to test drive stuff. Luthies in Greenville will have some but again no place to shoot. Tony at Luthies and Dan at J&S are both knowledgeable, and can take care of any needs that arise. I do not remember the man’s name a Buck and Bass. It will come to me later. Buck and Bass will be a good place to start. That way you will have a better idea of what you like and how much it will cost. Make sure you get a price that includes all the accessories. The bow will be $400 and then another $400 for everything else. Just drop me an E-Mail if you need anymore info. The guys are right, Bowhunting is a bug and once you catch it you just can not get enough. Let me know if you need anything.

3D
 

Zbearclaw

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Shoot them all, ask every question, and then come back and do the same.

Also the accessories, good rest, arrows, and sight particularly, can mean as much, or even more, than the bow.

What is your "total budget", not what you would "like to spend", but what your top dollar is, the "like to spend" is out the door when you shoot the top of the line model.

From that figure about 65% or so is the bow, and the rest is the other stuff.

Another thing that can throw it off is the bare bow you test shoot will feel totally different when you have the other stuff on it, so you should shoot everything with a stabilizer on it, I currently have a Mathews Outback, smooth and dead in the hand, but you can take a $500 bow and spend eighty or a hundred bucks on sound and vibration dampners and it feel the same.

It is fun to pick out a new bow, enjoy it, and get the one that says, take me home, she will tell you if you listen.

and last but not least, look at consignments and used bows, a used 05 or 06 top of the line bow will be darn near as good as anything put out since, and should be considerably cheaper, and you can have the "pro" outfit it for you and verify everything is good to go, unlike ebay and the like. Also I will say support your pro shop, if they are a good one, and all I have been in pretty much are, they will be the best archery investment you can make, and saving a few bucks is nothing compared to what you will get from becoming a "range rat".

go get her
 

Tominator

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Try Dwight's in Pendleton/Clemson area (The only Archery and Radiator shop in the world)...or just remind me in the AM while we're slaying the trout and I'll give ya the lowdown on all the local shops.
 

'Ike'

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As said and can't be said enough!!! Shoot as many models and makes you can...Then decide!

Make sure they get your correct draw length, that's huge! If you have questions, ask....Above all, have fun!!!
 


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