Guess that scat

Bigolwiggler

Well-known member
I was hunting yesterday at about 6000 ft. elevation yesterday in the trinity mtns. I came across a scat pile. I could tell that the animal had taken a dump here on 3 different occasions based upon the decomposition of the different piles. In the freshest stuff there were several bone shards and what appears to be a very small fawn hoof. All of the scat was packed with hair.
Guess that scat !
BOW
 

OPAH

Well-known member
Because of the Hoof, I would guess a young bear do to the size, its not on a rock and appears to be to large for a fox, the last would b a coyote which I think would be the right size and can see a coyote swallowing a hoof whole.
so I would go with coyote scat.
 

hunterdoug

Well-known member
I'm leaning towards mt. Iion, it's not bear at least not the normal configuration, coyote or cat, if I remember correctly cats have more of that pinched off look
 

Bigolwiggler

Well-known member
I kind of kicked the scat around before taking the pics. The size was about the size that a full grown Labrador would squeeze out. There was not a seed one in the poo.

It tasted a little rancid.... but in a good way : )
 
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OPAH

Well-known member
Coyote sounds right, they frenzy eat In a group so It would be easy for one to swallow that hoof trying to get as much as possible
 

Bigolwiggler

Well-known member
I used to go out with a friend of mine who was a trapper for the U.S. Ag dept. His main job was trapping coyotes In areas where sheep were ranged. What he looked for was coyote scat . They would poop over and over again on the same pile , a way of marking their territory. This is where he would set traps and was quite successful.
Coyote scat was about half the size of the stuff I pictured. I know its hard to tell from the pictures that I attached.

Mountain lions will do just what coyotes do , mark their territory by pooping in the same spot over and over . If its a female with young, she may bury it to conceal her presence from a male who may prey on her young.

That same afternoon that I found the scat, my wife found a large, fresh lion track about 1/4 mile away . It was a track from that day as it rained here the day before and would have weathered an older track. Lion tracks look much like a dog , But,they are more rounded And , more importantly, they generally leave no claw marks like a dog. Cats have retracting claws unlike dogs. I have seen many, many cat tracks in the mountains here . I have only actually seen the cats twice. Its quite an experience. Generally , there is a marked lack of deer in the area where I see tracks and generally wont deer hunt that area for a couple of years as it has proven dismal in the past.

After much scrutiny , I feel that the scat came from a squatch .
If not Sasquatch..... then my best educated guess would be lion.

Here is a clip from an article about lion scat.

Cougar Scat

Mountain lion scat tends to be segmented with a diameter of an inch or larger. It often contains hair and bits of bone which may give it a white coloration. Mountain lions deposit their scat in prominent locations such as the middle of trails and dirt roads, along ridgelines, and near kill caches as territorial markings. This behavior is more commonly seen with males than females.

Scat used for a scent maker is commonly deposited on top of a scratch pile. With his hind feed, a cougar will scrape the ground backwards creating a small mound of dirt and leaves with a shallow hole about 8 inches long in front of it. The mound is then urinated upon and sometimes also marked with scat. Although other species of cats "spray" urine and other fluids to scent mark, cougars do not appear to conduct this behavior. Scratch piles can be found throughout a cougar's homerange but may be found more often along the borders or where his territory overlaps with another cat's. "By advertising, an adult male may demonstrate his dominance and thereby reduce
the degree of trespass by other males (both resident and new immigrants), increase his own chances of breeding with resident females, and decrease the chances his mates and offspring will be harmed. Long-term residents have the opportunity to cover an area with scent marks, giving potential intruders ample opportunity to retreat before there is a life-threatening encounter" (Logan & Sweanor, Desert Puma).

As these scent markers are used for communication, a female ready for breeding that comes across a male's scratch pile may also urinate on it to indicate she is in the area and looking to mate. Females with cubs are not looking to breed, and researchers often found the scat of these cougars covered within scratch mounds - a pile of one or more scats buried in leaves and soil - near a kill site. Her kittens commonly also left their scat in this "toilet." Burying the scat might be a way to hide her scent and avoid attracting unwanted males who might harm her kittens. Males have been known to kill even their own
 
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Bigolwiggler

Well-known member
Bruce ..... are you suggesting that it might be Opah scat ?? Upon better scrutiny I think you might be onto something there .....
 

Bigolwiggler

Well-known member
In seriousness, the thought of wolf did cross my mind . There are probably more here than they have caught on camera. Northern Kalifornia is a big area.
 

hunterdoug

Well-known member
I have afriend who's a long haul trucker and very avid hunter and he told me some stories about seeing wolfs a few times in cali, mostly from grass valley north....he says no doubt their here and have been for a while...but I still put my money on mt lion, if it were a cougar you should findsome tp also :rotflmao:
 

Bigolwiggler

Well-known member
I have afriend who's a long haul trucker and very avid hunter and he told me some stories about seeing wolfs a few times in cali, mostly from grass valley north....he says no doubt their here and have been for a while...but I still put my money on mt lion, if it were a cougar you should findsome tp also :rotflmao:
Lol, or maybe a pair of bifocals or dentures ; )
 


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