Hevi-Shot

boutdoors4

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I was wondering if anyone has had any experience reloading this? How good is it?
 

Passthru

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boutdoors4,Im sorry i cant help you on this one as i dont reload shot shells,it seems i seen another post on hevi shot but could not find it for you,you may do a search to check every forum here and turn it up though.
 But I would like to take this time to Welcome you to the nut house,get in a straight jacket and pick a corner and stay awhile:smile-big-blue: we have alot of fun here!!!
 

boutdoors4

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thanks for the welcome I'm hoping to load it for waterfowl. A friend of mine was asking about it and I'm trying to find some info on it
 

Mossy Beard

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May have already been "thrashed" out here but I'm rather new here.
I'm thinking about trying it. 'Wondered if anybody had any experience ?
I'm using an AL390 with an xxx comp& choke.
Probably try #6.
I'm still a little reluctant on the big price tag...

Thanks,
Mossy Beard
 

Arrowhead

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Personally, the winchester shot I use kill's them pretty darn dead at ~ $8 per box. cannot see me changing anytime soon.
 

Mossy Beard

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Arrowhead,
No disagreement here, I use Winchester HV # 5 now.
Just curious what may warrant almost triple the cost for the Hevi's
In my area they're around 22.50/box.
Thought there may be a "revalation" I was missing out on.

Thanks,
Mossy Beard
 
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I don't really see much need for them out of a 12 gauge. But, I shoot Hevi-Shot out of a 20 gauge and it is awesome. Think about it... 6 shot lead pattern with 4 shot lead hitting power. It turns a 20 gauge 3" mag shotgun into a 30-35 yard turkey gun with out a problem.
 

spectr17

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Where Hevi-Shot shines is in penetration, more pellets in comparable loads and tighter patterns. With Hevi-Shot shells, you can shoot a smaller shot size with more lethality. More pellets at a higher energy means more knock-down power. I've used the old ACTIV ammo for years in #5 since it was a bit smaller in shot size and had more pellets compared to a REM or WIN load because of their shotshell design. I'm now switching over to Hevi-Shot. Here's why.

If you turkey hunt long enough you will eventually wing a bird. Whether it's from bad range estimation, you wobble at that crucial moment, the bird suddenly moves or just Murphy bites you. I've lost a couple birds in my years of turkey hunting and it still makes me sick to think about it. With Hevi-Shot, if you do hit low for some reason, this stuff can punch through the heavy wing feathers and bones. Turkeys are even harder to kill than big honker geese and these loads are stoning geese for me.

Some say their present load whacks turkeys already, what could be better? Very true, but refer to the Murphy scenerio. Do you want the best load if your off target a bit or one that only works if you hit the 10 ring. Is this saying Hevi-Shot is a crutch for poor shooting? Nope. It's just a good Plan B if something goes wrong, which happens in the real world of turkey hunting.

Ignore all the rumors of barrel scratching, the first loads a few years back were the culprit and the new buffering and plastic wad wrap has taken care of that. Also ignore the guys who don't understand basic high school physics and can't comprehend how a smaller pellet can contain the same or more down range energy. You either paid attention in science class and can grasp the basics of shotshell performance or you stared at little Sally in the third row.

Too pricey for your blood? Well, at first look it appears so. When I got my first Hevi-Shot duck and goose loads I compared shots per retrieved bird. I was retrieving more birds with one shot since I didn't have any cripples to shoot 2 or 3  times. After two years it was actually cheaper for me to shoot Hevi-Shot compared to steel. Almost the same costs per shell as Bismouth and Tungsten.

So, name a piece of turkey hunting gear that is very high on the crucial list that can effect success as much and that will cost $2.00, which is approximately the cost of 1 Hevi-Shot shell? Even mouth calls are more than that. I can only think of chalk for my box calls which is cheaper, and not by much. We spend hundreds on camo, guns, tags, calls, packs etc. but yet people claim the cost of Hevi-Shot is too much. Maybe my math is off but claiming this shot is too expensive doesn't make any sense to me. Bottom line, you'll pay about $1.00 more per shell. Is this too much too pay for some extra insurance on a dead bird? Not in my turkey hunting book.

Am I one of those who now thinks you can shoot 50 or 60 yard shots now? Not really. I practice out to 40 yards and feel most comfortable under that. It's all about how much you practice and knowing you guns capabilities. I've shot hundreds of different rounds out of my Rem 870 3" with about 10 different chokes. Hevi-Shot is one of the tighter patterns for me and the penetration on geese, coyotes and tin metal at 40 yards is something to see for yourself.

There are two versions of Hevi-Shot. The brand Remington sells which is what I've been using at $18 to $20 per box of ten depending on where you buy it. The older shells loaded by Poly-Wad are the ones that had the barrel scratching problem

Nitro Company Ammunition. Their Hevi-Shot turkey loads are made with a new high tech buffer and special formula coating to protect your barrel from scoring. This is THE best ammo you can buy for turkey hunting. It's more than the Rem but field reports are the stuff is wicked deadly. I haven't shot this shot yet but will try to get some this year for testing. At $27 a box for ten shells it's still cheaper than a mouth call per shot.

I've shot one turkey at 35 yards with Rem Heavi-Shot and it was a tip over with hardly  any dying cockroach flopping. I've also dumped some yotes, plenty of geese and ducks with it. When people first shoot it and fold a target, they always turn around with a big smile on their face and claim they have found Valhalla.

I dare say this load will be the cat's meow in the coming years.
 

Yankee

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spectr, very good post! Many guns shoot different patterns, some I hear of are fantastic. Unfortunately, I have never owned one of them , and I have tried many different choke/load combinations, had 2 companies that specialize in gun customizing for turkey, work on barrel`s for me, and still never gotten the results that many guys claim with stock of the shelf guns. I would not tell others to switch from what they are using, but you always hear the "cost" reasoning. I`m with you, even at $3.00 a shell it`s still the cheapest piece of gear I use. I take turkey hunting very seriously, and when it comes down to the shot, after the work it took to get there, I want the best I can get. I tried some of Ray`s loads this spring, on the pattern board they are nothing short of incredible, but like you said, when you see the results on game.....thats when you see that big smile and the thought`s of having found Valhalla. I don`t want to promote any long shot stuff either, I want a turkey inside 40 yards. I am not the best at range estimation, especially in the open, and usually wait as long as I can on a bird till I`m sure he is in range. I shot a turkey this spring in an open field, at the time, I figured he was into about 35, it was actually 41 paces. The bird was facing directly at me and when he periscoped straight up looking around,  I figured he had seen something he didn`t like, so it was time to shoot. With the bird straight on you don`t have that big a profile of his head (I like a broadside shot on the head) I use a red dot, so I put the dot between his waddles and his head. At the shot he flipped over backwards, head stuffed down in the grass.... nothing moving except some tail feathers which were sticking straight up blowing in the light breeze. I was amazed at the results, his face was a mess. I saw several others taken with the loads with the same results. Again, I`m not saying they are for everyone, but if your thinking of trying some.....do it! There`s my 2 cents :smile-yellow:
 

Mossy Beard

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Thanks for the comments.
I'll probably try some. Although I'm not at the same financial station as Bill Gates,(lol)
the cost is worth it if they "work".
Having hunted turkeys quite alot, I've had the misfortune of watching a couple "dead" ones run off.
In this day and age of a multitude of "gimmics", I was looking for some first hand experience.
Thanks again,
Mossy Beard
 

SPUR

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I experimented with the hevi shot this past spring and had mixed results until I found the right load.
A word of caution , I wouldn't use just any choke with it. Some chokes are made from a tube and have a weak spot ( this is how comp n choke explained it) and others are made from a solid piece of steel (Rhino). Thus some choke sprobably shouldn't be used with hevishot.
Anyway, I tried the remington loads and was not impressed. However I finally broke down and ordered a box of handloaded hevi shot from Nitro Co. and man what a difference. I'm putting over 200 pellets in a 10" circle at 50 yds. No, I normally don't shoot turkeys at 50 yds. 30-35 is my normal range, but when I guide I expect the unexpected. Clients this year crippled 4 birds for various reasons and they were all finished off with one shot from the hevishot . Distances varied from 45 to 60 yds. That is the beauty of hevishot.   Awesome pattern, penetration and knockdown power. It is pricey but I think it paid for itself this past season. A side note. I had three friends switch to hevishot after the season and all have repoted pellet counts over 180 in a 10" circle at 50 yds. The guns involved are a mossberg, a benelli and 2 brownings.
 

GobbleGig

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I made the switch to Hevi-Shot last year and I don't expect to be shooting any other load any time soon. Amazing stuff. I also shoot the Nitro Company's load. It's their 3.5 inch, 12ga. 4x5x7 load. I shoot it out of a Mossberg 835 with a Rhino choke. This combination gives me the tightest pattern I ever had. I dropped an Osceola gobbler last March in an open field which I am not used to hunting in. That bird dropped like he was hit with a sledge hammer. I stepped off the distance and it was 53 yards.
 

Ronniemc

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I had a friend that used it on our Texas Rio hunt last year. He missed a big Rio and was not real satisfied with the performance of the heavy shot at long range--in this case only about 35 to 40 yards. Of course we know one should not shoot at turkeys that are "too far" out, but at 40 yards the right load with the right gun and right choke should be effective a very high percentage of the time. There was no brush to diminish his pattern, only distance. He felt that the heavy shot dropped faster than did traditional lead shot.

I have not used heavy shot and probably will not. Not so much because of my buddy's experience with it, but like others, I see not point in paying the higher price when I am not convinced the added benefits exceed the added costs.
 

Arky

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Here is an article by guns and ammo that might help clear up some confusion of heavy shot.
Guns and Ammo

It says, "What was supposed to be a load of No. 4s was really a mix of everything from 2s to 7 1/2s..." I was looking for a duplex load made by remington, but didn't have any luck. Doesn't look like I need to look any further.

I got a $60 gift certificate to cabela's for christmas so the price isn't a big deal.
By the way, which turkey load would you recommend? I'm shooting a mossberg 835 with a .680 mad max choke. I was think of buying #6 shot.
 

Ronniemc

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Arky,

If I were you I'd test 4s 5s and 6s. My 10 ga. shoots 4s best. My 12 ga. (Rem 870 super mag) does best with 5s. If I can't get 5s for it, I would use 4s. Why do they pattern different? Don't really know. I have friends that prefer 6s in their 12 Ga. guns (various mfgs.). I also get better patterns with Winchester shells in my 12 ga. (870), but with Federal shells in my 10 ga. I did not achieve satisfactory results with duplex shells--I had holes (size of turkey head--bad holes!) in my pattern (this was in my 12 ga.). I have not shot them in my 10 ga.

ronniemc
 

gobblestopper

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Dead is dead and I cant kill them any deader than with my winchester supreme #5's.
Seems like I keep hearing the same old story with nitro. Everyone wants to have that little extra in case their range estimation is off. Well, start working on it and become a better hunter because of skill, not technology. Once you can shoot them at 50 yards, then you will stretch it to 60 and once at 60 then to 70 and so on and so forth.

All of this nonsense, kind of makes you wonder how guys ever killed a turkey 20 years ago since they did'nt have 3.5 inch shells and nitro ammo huh?
 

GobbleGig

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You have some good points Gobblestopper. But this is the 21st century and as much I would like to go back and hunt with Daniel Boone, I can't so I will live in this time and shoot Hevi-Shot. Heck, I bet Daniel called um in that close that he only used a knife.
 

Ronniemc

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gobblerstopper has a point. I killed my first bird in 1966 with a paper shell field load number 6 in my Dad's old LC Smith double barrel. I spooked the bird (stood up cause I did not know it was coming to my call--no gobbling) and shot it on the fly. No doubt it was good luck rather than good shooting, but it really happened. I finally started using hi-brass in the late 60s. By then I actually had enough money to buy my own shells rather than use my Dad's old shells (so old they were not evern red anymore). I never saw a turkey load until the 80s, and I think it was mid to late 80s at that.

Now don't get me wrong, I don't want to go back to using field loads. New shells are great, but knowing your gun, getting them in close, and making a good shot sure does help your odds.

Ronniemc
 


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