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Hi New poster, 20 gauge question.

hookup66

Active member
Hi , got a 20 gauge over under, for dove season, previously have used 12 gauge. Looking for a recommenndation for chokes on etc. first barrel, second etc. thanks, plan on hunting from el centroid to Yuma.
 

BIGCIM

Well-known member
Behind enemy lines use an C or mod(steel). In a free state use and IC,M and IM, full

On your 2nd shot your target is normally further away so you would use a tighter choke.

YMMV, my advise is only worth what you paid for it.
 

jbv

Well-known member
Just remember if you are running IC, it will shoot more like a LM or M with steel shot. So basically, choke down from what i am patterning in my own 20 gauge. I usually shoot IC and LM out of my 20 gauge. This year I am using Skeet and IC. Also keep in mind a 7.5 shot in lead patterns differently in different chokes and differently in lead vs steel.

But...don't take my word for it. Pattern your gun with the steel you will be using. There are some slight nuances between different steel loads from what I have experienced.
 
Last edited:

Limited Out

Well-known member
The best approach is the one suggested by jbv. Take the time and pattern your new gun. I tend to like tighter chokes so I lean in that direction. I would consider using a LM (light Modified) for the first barrel and a IM (Improved Modified) for the second. I would also get a modified. I would use the combination of any of these three chokes to produce the most uniform pattern density at 25 yards, for the more open chokes, and at 45 yards for the tighter chokes. This will also help you see where the gun's point of aim is relative to where it hits the paper, good to know. I have one gun that consistently shoots low and to the left from the point of aim. Use some sort of steady rest when patterning and shoot a few rounds per choke or for each type of ammo. You might consider using lighter shot in the first barrel (#7s) and #6s in the second. This is how I set up my double guns to get the most versatility out of them. The long and the short of it is to try and replicate, as close as possible, the shooting conditions you will encounter in the field on the opener. Good Luck with the new gun!
 

hookup66

Active member
I made a mistake and said I was a first poster, sorry, got this site confused with another. Thanks for the great info.
 


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