Homebrew Duckboats

Welby

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Anyone out there building and using homebrew duckboats such as pirogues?
 

Welby

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Here is a pic of my first homebrew pirogue.  This is fresh out of the water from an early morning hunt last year.  

This is made from ordinary 1/4" exterior plywood and fiberglass.  These can actually be built for under $100, or about the cost of building a good homebrew camera.  Notice the camo job I did...that's ordinary oil based house paint.  It blends in right well with the flooded timber we hunt.


You can paddle these things in less than six inches of water and over log jams too!  I have since built a smaller and lighter pirogue from which to hunt.  I can carry it on my shoulder, yet it has a transom from which to mount a trolling motor.  It has an even better camo job too.  Oh, and I have only about $85 in it.

(Edited by Welby at 12:03 am on Mar. 15, 2001)
 

gizz

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That's impressive!
Show us some more pics of your projects if you can.
I'd be interested in attempting something like this although I must say that it may be a little more than I should attempt.
Anyways, Good job!
gizz
 

Welby

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Thanks for the compliments on the pirogue.  Here's another website to try for pirogue plans.

http://www.unclejohns.com

A few years back, Wooden Boat magazine printed some plans in one of their magazines for what's called a "Six Hour Canoe", which is basically the same as a cajun pirogue.  I based my first pirogue (the one in the pic above) on those plans.  I still have those plans and am willing to share with anyone interested.

To me, the plans for the "Six Hour Canoe" seem to make a more durable boat than most pirogue plans that I've seen.  Most pirogue plans call for the stitch-n-glue method, which involves "sewing" the wooden panels together with copper wire and bonding the joint with an epoxy filler.  The "Six Hour Canoe" construction utilizes a little more wooden framework that makes the craft more sturdy, but also heavier.  Both methods though are tried and true and will yield a quality boat.

I encourage any outdoorsman to build one of these simple boats.  This would also be a wonderful father-son experience.  The result of this project is not only a wonderful tool for exploring those hidden sloughs or trouncing those backwater ducks, but it is also a source of hours of escape and relaxation, a craft that truly awakens the sense of adventure in all of us.
 


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