How best to use mid day time?

shufigo

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I've got my favorite spots for daybreak and that last magic hour before dark.  But how can you productively spend all those daylight hours inbetween when (except for the rut) nothing seems to be moving?  Not that I expect it will make much difference, but I'm talking about Tidewater Virginia, swamps, thickets, field edges, some hardwoods and a lot of replanted pine.  All suggesitons welcome!!
 

prohunter

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glass for them in there beds. i sat at a canyon at about noon one day and spotted a deer getting up to stretch at about 1:30
 

Speckmisser

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Kinda hard to glass the beds in the Tidewater area, Pro.  And most of the canyons off of VA are in the ocean. :)

Shufigo, when I hunted the pocosin and swamps down in North Carolina, there wasn't a lot you could do for the mid-day slump.  The stuff there is just too thick to stalk through, and if you pushed something up, it's likely to disappear into the catclaws before you ever even see fur.

If you're in a good spot with food and water, the deer will often move around some during the day.  Way too many times to count, I've come back into my morning stand for the evening hunt, and found fresh tracks crossing my own trail.  

They don't stay bedded all day, unless there's a lot of pressure or really bad weather.  This is especially true when you have a changing system coming in, say a low pressure front coming across.  Those weather edges will get some daytime movement going almost every time.  But once the weather hits, if it's heavy rain or wind, you're better off staying in the house.

On the other hand, if you're in an area with lots of hunters, hunt the funnels and let the hunters push deer to you when they start leaving.  You read about this all the time in the hook-n-bullet mags, like Outdoor Life, but I'm here to tell you it can really be productive.  Just have to learn the land and be patient.

Best bet is to stay on the stand as long as you can handle it, go away and take a break for a while, then come back to it.  Days are short right now anyway.

Good luck!
 

Haary

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What we usually do in the middle of the day is to work the bedding areas.  By this I mean we put a couple of people on high points where they can see the areas we are going to work.  Then the rest of us  start beating the brush.  Work our way through the heavy brush throwing rocks into the draws and ravines.  The brush is usually so thick that those in the brush don't see the deer we push out but the guys on stand can see them.

The nicest blacktail I ever got (4x4 24"wide) was a result of this type of hunt.  I was beating the bush and when I came to the end of the drive.  The person on stand, my friend's 78 year old grandmother told me see had seen a nice buck and two does come out and head up this deadend canyon.  She told me to circle up around to the head of the canyon.  Then when her grandson came out of the brush she sent him and his fox terrier up the middle of the canyon.  I could see the buck and the two does in the bush at the bottom of the canyon below me.  As my friend and his dog got closer to the buck the he nudged the does out and they gave running up the canyon right past me.  When the dog started getting too close the buck bolted and headed up the canyon right towards me.  As he got closer I jumped out from behind the brush and got him to flare off so I could get a shot angling away rather than head on.  My shot (243) broke his left shoulder and his right upper leg.  He tumbled but got back up.  So I shot a second time, this time through the heart and he went down for good.  The first shot was at about 40 yards.    

Later that day one of the other guys kicked a real interesting buck out of bed.  It was a blacktail also but weighed about 210 pounds.  It's horns were only about 6 or 7 inches high but were about four inches in diameter.  They didn't have any forks or tines, only about twenty short hooks and points less than an inch or so each.  The horns were covered with what looked like a velvet or moss like material.  He didn't have any testicles either.  Which may explain his heavy weight and strange horns.   meuns
 

shufigo

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Thanks all, especially Specmisser  I think I'll find the best vantage point I can get on the downwind side of a bedding area and just camp out 'till it's time to leave for the evening hotspot.  Shuf
 

Speckmisser

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Sounds like a good call, Shuf.  

By the way, the rut should be coming on out there soon.  I never tried it, but calling and rattling might provide some interesting results.  

Good luck, and post pictures of Mr. Big when you get him.
 

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