How it's supposed to work

songdog

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I wiffed on a coyote at the last JHP hunt out at Carrizo.  The gun was on.  The sun wasn't in my eyes.  It wasn't a long shot.  I wiffed because I didn't play the coyote right.  I saw him a long way off (600 yards) and he came on a dead run.  I was laying down trying to hide when he got close and I never got a chance to get into a shooting position.  When he was 30 yards out he turned tail and ran.  That's how to do it wrong.

This is how to do it right.   I shot this coyote at about 150 yards after he came in to about 20 yards.  I was well hidden in a bush but he came in running so fast that it would have been a really tough shot.  I held motionless and he figured something wasn't quite right but didn't know what.  He walked/trotted away but you just knew that he was going to stop and look back.  When he turned to leave, I raised my gun (Ruger #1RSI in .243) and followed him all the way out to 150 yards or so just before he got out of sight.  At the brushline, he stopped for a split second and looked back just one more time... it was his last.
 

Hager

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Song Dog, how often do you stop your coyotes when there on a dead run.  I have not yet had the pleasure of shooting coyotes in your area but I do know that carrying a mouser with you and giving just a small squeek can stop a coyote up to a hundred yards out no problem.  It doesnt matter what call you are using to get the coyote to come in because sometimes if they here a mouse 50 yards away they may stop anyway instead of going after that big Jackrabbit.  Back in the badlands (ND) we even tape the mouser to the forearm or the scope for easy access.
 

songdog

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Getting them to stop isn't normally a problem.  Sometimes though, they're just dead set on running in full speed.  Normally this happens when I have the gun across my lap.  I'm amazed at how a coyote can close 500 yards while looking exactly at the bush that you're sitting in.  Any movement would give your hide away.  This is pretty rare though.  Sometimes I'll give them a little lip squeak which will do it.  The one at Carrizo just took that as confirmation that something was up and took off.

I think that this is the difference between someone who calls coyotes and someone who kills coyotes.  Having that 6th sense for what they're going to do when.  Can you read their body language well enough to know that they are or are not going to stop before going over that ridge, etc.  Just when you think you've mastered them... they pull one on you to make you realize that they're a lot better hunters than we are.
 

Dakota

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I have to bump Songdog on that one.  It is incredible how they can isolate the exact juniper or bush where you are calling from, from a short blast on a call.
 

Hogskin

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That's why I'm a fan of the electronic caller.  You've got the speaker in a bush 30 feet away and that's where they're focusing.  For a guy who is a good coyote hunter (like Songdog), an e-caller probably isn't that big of a help.  For a guy like me, it makes a lot of difference.

Regards,
Paul
 

songdog

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e-callers have their advantages too.  For something like bobcat, I think that they make a big difference.  They're so sneaky that they often see you before you see them.  It doesn't take much movement at all for them to spot you.

e-callers also have their downside.  I think that a lot of those go away when you get one of the remotes.  Being able to turn it on and off and adjust the volume really helps.  

A friend and I were calling out at Wister a couple of years ago and he was using his new Johnny Stewart caller.  He had one come through the brush at about 70 yards and he took a shot with [what he thought was] the .22 Hornet barrel on his Savage 24F.  Turns out it was the 12ga barrel and the coyote just got peppered at 70 yards and took off.  We stood up and I was ribbing him (it wasn't the first time he'd done this) while the caller was still going.  As we walked up to turn it off another coyote came busting through the brush right in front of us.  Of course, we missed that one too but you get the idea...
 

Hager

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Song Dog,  In reply to your second post.  THATS WHY I'M ADDICTED TO COYOTE CALLING.  No matter how many coyotes you have called in, the situation is different every time out.  One day the wind is just a tiny bit wrong or the next day the coyote just decides he isn't that hungry.
As for E- callers, no tape has the ability to chage pitch and volume as fast as my Red Desert Thompson howler and my Tally HO.
 

Hogskin

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I think another advantage of an ecaller is that you don't have to blow it until your blue in the face.  And you can get a lot of different types of calls and have good sound without having to practice a lot.  There definitely are disadvantages, though.  Lugging it out to various stands, batteries that have to be recharged.  Their mechanical devices which always have the possibility of breaking (even the Johnny Stewarts!).  And they ain't cheap.  I do like mine, though.

The remotes are definitely nice, but they're not cheap.  One of these days.....


Regards,
Paul
 


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