How to read and understand schematics

MikeObryan

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I built my first motion sensor camera with the rs motion sensor and it works great. the only reason I was able to build it was because of the pictures on how to do it.  I want to wire up a timer to add to my cameras or maybuild circuits to run a camcorder but don't understand schematics real well or howto take a cicuit board that I would have built and add it into my project.  Just new and confused!  Help me out guys

Mike
 



INshedpicker

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I'll help you with what I can, but I am still a dummy.  If there is a particular circuit you're interested in, I'm sure someone here could post a pic which may make things a bit less murky.  Is it that you don't understand the symbols on the schematics?  Just trying to narrow the scope of your question.  Maybe we can pick things apart one piece at a time...
 

wfontjr

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i find the simplest timer is to wire up the "welby" one shot timer to take a picture and use the ms20 timer for the delay, all specs are with the schematic, i believe jesses has it in the directions, i can send you a copy if you can not find it

building the circuit is pretty easy just solder dot to dot
 

MikeObryan

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Well Actually I can read the schematic as far as components and the wiring of them.  Its more like I've got this got circuit I've built how do I add it to my pir or camera and such.  There are some things i don't understand on a schematic, like I see a couple ground symbols used. How do you ground a circuit?  And some schematics i've seen on here have multiple wires that go to v+  v- . Do I run these to the actual battery terminal or something that recieves positive or negative voltage.  Boy I'd love to have someone sitdown and point out how to go about it.  I believe it would only take once.  Oh and as far as you guys that invent circuits that do certain things, you guys are blow me away.

Thanks
Mike
 

Brian

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MikeObryan,

You ground a circuit in this case with the ground from your battery source.  This can be denoted as GND or V-.  When using batteries it will always be the negative post of your battery.  The V+ is always the plus of your battery.
What might be confusing is when the V+ or battery voltage is supplying power to a voltage regulator which is a speciliaze component that delivers a fixed voltage usually lower than the supply voltage and it is usually denoted by 5V or 10V or what the regulatore is designed for.  The reason for the V+ instead of say 12 V or 12 Voltages is the circuit in question may be able to work off 9 V or 9 volts and the 12 V would imply that it can't.  If you denoted it like 9-12 Volts then this would be a better representation of the required voltage.

I will try to give you a quick example.  Lets say you use the RS sensor with a nine volt batter and a timer made by JoeD or myself.  The 9V symbol would go on the RS sensor for its supply but a 5 Volt symbol from the regulator of the RS sensor would go with the timer chip since it uses the 5 volt regulator that is built into the RS sensor.  Some might even put a V+ for the supply of the RS sensor instead of our 9 volts implying that it will run off several voltages.  Gnd is always ground unless using AC and things can get hairy but it is still ground.  If you see multiple grounds on a schematic then that means they all have to be connected together to the battery gnd for everything to work.
I hope I haven't confused you more but if you have a particular schematic I know you are looking at then I can explain it better with your questions on what you don't understand.

Later
 

MikeObryan

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wfont jr

 Can you send me the one shot timer

Thanks alot

Mike  courtneyandmike@netzero.net
 

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