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How to sharpen a knife?

Stirling Sharpeners out of Diamond, MO  (417) 325-4256
Uses a carbide to shave the 316 or 440 stainless sharp again.  It is all of 1 minute and you can be shaving with it.  Have not sean anything else like it.  They tour the hunting show circuit.  I'll be buying 20 of them this weekend at the show in Wisconsin for stocking stuffers.  $14.95 for one lots less when you buy 20 for your friends.
It sharpens stardard razorblades to like new.  Looks like a small credit card.
Don't have stock just really like their product.
 

QALHNTR

Well-known member
<font face="Tahoma">After reading this post a few months ago, I bought the Lansky.  It sat in the garage for a while.  Finally, opened it up on Mother's day and sharpened up the wife's knives.  Didn't take long and I got a great edge.  Maybe she'll do my fillet knives for me?</font>
 

songdog

Well-known member
I, too, went out and bought the Lansky stuff.  I like the concept and for some knives it will work well but overall I was disappointed.  

The clamp that holds the knife blade is of really low quality and is almost impossible to get clamped back in the same location once you remove the knife.  That means that you're removing a lot more steel than needed when you go back to sharpen the second time on the Lansky.

Does anyone make a similar system with higher quality parts that can reclamp the knife at the exact same location/angle each time?
 

bogwalker

Member
I worked at a slaughterhouse about a hundred years ago.We used Russel Green River knives and I liked them a lot.I did every job there and I liked siding the best.We had a air knife which seldom worked right so I use the green rivers and all was good.All we used to get a shaving type edge was a regular two sided carborundum stone with water and dish soap and a steel afterwards.I think todays knife makers are trying to hard to get an edge that will last "forever "rather than an edge that is easy to repair.When I was skinning heads if I hit bone due to working to fast it was okay but if I hit teeth I wanted to sit down and cry! The only good things I have to say about Buck knives is they are good to give away!! Take care!
 

Brad

Moderator
Moderator
Welcome to the forum bogwalker. I think the best cutting knifes are the ones that rust easy and have to be sharpened often. All my kitchen knifes are ugly and rust if left in the sink(wife and daughter), but cut good and sharpen up easy.
 

whitetailfan

Well-known member
I learned a neat trick for skinning from a local taxidermist. It's a really high-tech gadget called an Exacto-Knife!!!LOL Works great for skinning and gutting, plus there's no worry about sharpening and they're not expensive so it's worth it to me just to use them. Also, a regular straight razor blade works great. I do however like to use a quality knife for butchering which I seldome do myself. I just usually take it to the local "Wild Game Processor".
 

big tom

Active member
I read an article in Hunting and Fishing news, this one expert said to forget stones, use a small table mounted belt sander, you know the one with the 1" wide belts, and use 180 grit aluminum oxide sandpaper, never garnet. Check for the rolled over edge, then turn blade over and remove the rolled over edge. Any one ever try using a sander? I have the Lansky, I found it takes alot of time to get a new edge on, but use the yellow (very fine) stone to get a polish. This makes the edge like the orginal factory finish.
 

MarinePMI

Well-known member
Well, I guess I've ignored this post long enough...

For all the guys with the "Lansky" knife sharpener I have to say...throw it away, it's junk. Sharpening a knife is half art, half common sense (IMHO). The biggest mistake I see people often make is that they take great care of the knife and ignore the stone. Dirty, clogged stone=shitty edge/takes for ever.

Personally, I prefer the circular strokes on a stone (clockwise on one side, counter clockwise on the other). This creates small (read microscopic) serrations across the edge. But it all for moot, if the stone is clogged. Periodically, when the stone no longer "bites" the blade it must be cleaned. Ajax or Comet scouring powder works the best, but sand/loose dirt works just as well out in the field. The angle of the blade could be argued until the sun goes down. I believe this is because it greatly depends on the thickness of the blade as to how much of an angle is necessary for a keen edge. As my father once told me, "when you sharpen a knife, you should feel as if you're shaving a layer of stone off the shapening stone." It sounds weird, but it's very true. This is what I mean by the stone "biting". It should feel as if the blade is biting enough to take a thin layer of stone off. Don't press real hard, and don't over sharpen (yes, this is possible). I've been using a quality arkansas stone for years, never had a problem as long as the stone was clean.

Maybe I'm wrong, but this is what has worked for me over the years...whether it be a KA-Bar/bayonet or a fine piece of cutlery (Hienckels).

BTW, here's a trivia question tossed out for yucks....

Can anyone tell me what "KA-BAR" stands for?
 

Grey Taylor

Well-known member
Well heck, since no one else has put it out there I'l say it...

"BTW, here's a trivia question tossed out for yucks....

Can anyone tell me what "KA-BAR" stands for?"

"Y'all got a good knife, I Killed A BeAR with it when my rifle was empty."
 

MarinePMI

Well-known member
GT,

LOL! Okay, the answer:

Back in WWII, actually prior to it, the Marine Corps realized the standard issue bayonet was useless to the squad machine gunner. Mainly because the browning, had no bayonet lug, so what was the point of carrying around a pig sticker that had to be specially made to fit on a rifle they didn't have. Hence the KA-BAR was born. Made by Oleans of New York, this knife became (and still is) a basic part of every Marine Infantryman's standard issue. Oh what does KA-BAR stand for?...It was how the knives were listed in the supply system......

Knife, Accessory-Browning Automatic Rifle

So concludes the history lesson today gentlemen! LOL!
 

quigleysharps4570

Well-known member
10 of my working years was in a packing house. Seen knives sharpened many different ways by many different guys. I ground mine on the ole slow water wheel grinder, followed by a stone, course on one side, medium on the other. The main ingredient is a steel that "works", can't keep that sharp edge going long without one. As for the belt-sanders, no knife of mine will ever see one of those. I'll take the ole slow but sure route.
 

Val

Well-known member
Based on the feed back here, I'm looking at the Lansky sharpeners. Anyone know where to get them at the best prices? Any significant difference in the quality of the knife edge with the diamond stones vs. the non diamond? Thanks for your help?
 

Goodranger

Well-known member
Best thing I ever did was read John Jurantich's book, The Razor Edge Book of Sharpening. I was introduced to his philosophy at a hunting show 20 years ago. I have sharpened my own knives and also for others for 30 years, and this book really helped me get a better understanding of what I was trying to accomplish, and do it better and in less time. Check out their systems at www.razoredge.com. Mr. Jurantich has done more study of the art of sharpening, and of edges themselves, than anyone I have found. I use several different methods depending on the knife type. I use Lansky for pocket knives, Razor Edge guide for my hunting knives, and compressed paper wheels on my bench grinder for my butcher and kitchen knives. The wheels produce the sharpest polished edge by far, but you need to have a good, practiced hand and eye to use it successfully, and yes, you can ruin the temper of a blade easily if you don't pay attention. The Razor Edge guide puts a shaving edge on my hunting knives that lasts well through field dressing and skinning several deer.

By the way, Jurantich recommends stainless steel for knives, as the edge definitley lasts longer, and knife maintenance is easier.

For what its worth.....

Goodranger
 

TazBux

Well-known member
When i had found a knife once it had a bit of surface rust.So i got out the 1200 grit wet and dry and gave it a polish.Once i had sanded it i filled the palm of my hand with extra cut polish and began making strokes accross my palm,I cut myself good.


So a thik peice of material diped in polish and laid out on a flat surface ,is how i do all my knifes now.Shave with them of course.
 
I'm brand new to posting - has anyone tried the bench top grinding wheel knife sharpeners? They sell special wheels for your benchtop grinder to sharpen knives. Search Ebay as knife sharpening wheel. There are usually two wheels. I've tried so many different things that didn't work I was hoping to save myself some trouble if anyone has tried it.
 

Goodranger

Well-known member
Hey Highfence!

From earlier post above:

I use Lansky for pocket knives, Razor Edge guide for my hunting knives, and compressed paper wheels on my bench grinder for my butcher and kitchen knives. The wheels produce the sharpest polished edge by far, but you need to have a good, practiced hand and eye to use it successfully, and yes, you can ruin the temper of a blade easily if you don't pay attention. The Razor Edge guide puts a shaving edge on my hunting knives that lasts well through field dressing and skinning several deer.
 

Land Cruiser

Well-known member
Unreal. 48 posts and Spyderco Sharpmaker is mentioned only once. Post this same topic on Bladeforums and you'd get Sharpmaker in 90% of replies. Nothing wrong with Lansky, nothing wrong with old art of sharpening with stone but for those of you who want their knives razor sharp from completely dull in less than 30 minutes without any sort of learning curve Sharpmaker is the way to go. It is indeed more expensive, but let me tell you, procuring my base set it was the best $50 bucks I ever spent. Of course later I got diamond and ultra-fine rods but now I am covered. I take pride in sharpening my knives and I could probably learn to use good old Arkansas stone but there are other more interesting things in my life and time is rather scarce. My left forearm is bold most of the time because this is how I test the sharpness of my knives and if at any given point of time one of my many knives stops shaving hair, I take out my Sharpmaker and in 10 minutes it is back where I like it - wicked, razor-sharp!
 

Goodranger

Well-known member
50 bucks? 30 minutes? 10 minutes?

The Razor Edge system beats it every category. Plus you will ALWAYS get a better quality edge with a guide-type system. That is just a fact of geometry and physics. The edge will be sharper and last longer. Get the Razor Edge edge tester and you can prove it for yourself. I did. There is just no comparison. While the Sharpmaker is probably the best sharpener of its type (angled rods) and I realize that freehand can get you fairly sharp, you just can't be as accurate or as get an edge as sharp as when you use a fixed edge guide.

I do like angled rods for longer blades ( 5 inches +), but I prefer the compressed paper wheels on a grinder when I have the time to sit down and do several long blades at a sitting.
 


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