Hunting around train tracks

Norcalihunter

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I know you cant hunt ''near'' them but the area that is surrounded by them? Would it not be considered federal/state land? and be open to hunting as long as you could be a certain ways away from the roads and tracks?

Me and a friend have been discussing this for a few weeks. We have both made call(s) to dfg in regards to one area we would like to hunt. One person said ''yes'' one person said ''no''.

Thoughts? Experiences? Anybody have the laws written down in regards to this? Couldnt find this covered in the dfg hand booklets.....
 

BigBearHntr

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My friend and I bird hunt all of the time on and around some tracks in the imperial valley and have never had a game warden say anything to us except be careful when on the tracks. Just my personal experience, I dont know what the law is.

Daniel
 

Tree Doc

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Most train tracks are not federal or state property. They are privately held easements which run through private or in some cases public land. The easements are controlled by the individual railroad company.
 

Norcalihunter

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I talked to someone who works on those tracks today and he said it is legal and has seen people hunt there but really honestly its just not worth it to me to try and hunt it until i know for damn sure that its totally legal.

Everyone I've talked to says its state land not privatley owned, I'll have to make sure on that one.
 

Rookies

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The way I look at it is that if you see a big buck that you can shot by the railroad, and their aren’t any trains coming. Which would probably scare the deer away anyways. Shoot straight and do not hit the train tracks cause it might bounce back at you.

Well if you hit the deer and do kill it, drag it where if a train comes, the people on the train won’t see it.

I don’t think that you will find anything about this situation by looking in the book or asking dfg. They probably have never or had very few people ask about this situation, because most private lands, you will never see railroads running through them. They basically won’t know the answer or tell you the answer they think in their right on mind. Maybe I can be wrong but I have never seen any railroad tracks or cross any railroad tracks in D-13 zone or A zone. By the look of it you're probably hunting private grounds. Do you think you can get in trouble if there isn’t any written law’s about this? I think you just created another law for DFG to write up next year. Well... it's always good to ask then not to know. Good luck and shoot straight.
 

larrysogla

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Remember the law(state, federal, county, city, township) that governs all of these is that "if the land you hunt is not your own, then you need written permission from the landowner to access AND(very important) hunt in that land. It is called in everyday language "TRESPASSING". If there is an incident, you can be sure the railroad will blame responsibility on you for "trespassing". Then, you have bought the farm. It is always "buyer beware". Be safe, be legal(you may get away with it a hundred times, then one sunny, blue sky day, "MURPHY" shows up). You will not be the first and you will not be the last the railroad has charged for trespassing.
God Bless. larrysogla.
 

larrysogla

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All it will need is for some crazed animal lover working for the railroad, inspecting the tracks on one of those pick-up trucks with retractable railroad wheels to call in their radio & complain that there is an "armed trespasser" on the right of way & a sheriffs helo can be circling in minutes. Now there is a complaint of an armed person, you can be sure they will be asking you questions & if they want to be unreasonable about it, ask for your written permission from the landowner. And then
there goes your paycheck for those legal fees.
larrysogla.
 

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