Hunting boots

Brnsvllyjohn

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I have used more from Danner than any other brand over the years but it seemed that the last couple of pairs that I purchased didn't hold up as long as I thought they would. This last summer I started looking at other brands as well as Danner. Unfortunately where I live there really aren't a lot of stores to visit to try boots on. I read about a few from Europe as well as Kenetreks. I settled on a pair of Crispi and so far I have been happy. Reading the reviews on other forums about the Kenetreks it seemed like it was a love hate relationship with them. Most people who had narrow feet hated them. (I have narrow feet) Guys with wide feet didn't like Crispi. I figured Crispi made sense for me. I had to order them and I was careful about the sellers return policy. Basically as long as I didn't wear them outside I could send them back. I wore them on carpet for an hour or so and the fit was good. So far they are waterproof and not as heavy as some other boots I have worn. I know one deer season isn't a great test but so far so good. I follow the recommended boot care procedures on all of my boots but the Danners still seemed to not last all that long. I still wear them on some hunts as well as a pair of Merrill hiking boots but for serious stuff the Crispis are now my best boot.
Of course in deep snow I still like a pack boot with a rubber sole.

Just food for thought if you are looking at new boots.
 

ChrisAMX

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Ive been using a pair of Oboz Yellowstone's since 2012. Still have that pair. Good quality and fit. I usually just clean and sno-seal every year.. I took a chance and got a new pair of Schnee's Beartooth Mids un-insulated. They feel pretty good, however my left foot is a little more narrow than the right. I may have to get some sort of insert for it. In the future, I may want to look at the Crispi because I have narrow feet too. For deeper snow and cold I'm currently using Merrell Polarand 8's, which I haven't put to any long distance use yet.
 

ltdann

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Wolverine waterproof, with 800 grm thinsulite for me. By far the lightest and toughest boots I've owned.
 

Bankrunner

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I've had expensive hunting boots and work boots in the past. The Danner and a couple pair of red wings didn't last as long as i thought they should so I've gone to lower priced boots that are on sale. Merrell moab is decent boot if you can find it on sale and other brands like Hi-tech in their mid priced boots are usually what I end up with. They work for me and at +/- $60 a pair (sale prices) I don't care if they only last a couple or a few seasons. I've also got a pair of good rubber boots and a pair of sorel caribou's for cold cold weather. I've replaced the wool liners on the sorels and they're ready for another set but the boots are still in great shape considering they are over 25 years old.
Checked out the wolverine king caribous on line, they look good and the reviews are in line with ltdann's. Might have to keep an eye out for a sale price on those.
The biggest fail on my boots is the seems. The stitched or the glued seems will separate and start to open wider and wider with use. One thing that extends the life of boots for me is Shoe Goo. Scrape the inside of the open seam with a knife to clean and roughen the material, then put the shoe goo inside the open seam as far as you can with a sharpened chopstick or a tooth pick. Press the seam together and last but not least is to tape the seam closed with masking tape or painters tape until the glue drys. The tape really works well to hold the seam closed while the glue sets.
 
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