INFRARED PHOTOS

whitetailfan

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2002
Messages
112
Reaction score
0
I have been thinking about trying the IR film cuz I saw the idea on Jesse's site. I like the thought of NO FLASH at all. I was wondering if anyone here has tried it yet and if so, what kind of results did they get. Does anyone have any pics to show?? If no one has tried it, I think I'll make that my next cam project. I think it would be neat. Any suggestions??
 

Tinhorn

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 13, 2001
Messages
3,516
Reaction score
0
Besides all that, how come you don't use IR ! ! ! ha ha, just kidding

I moved the Text to Random Thoughts since this will be of interest to others

Tinhorn
 

INshedpicker

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
Messages
235
Reaction score
0
Let's not forget that Curtiss has been working of IR video.  Where's he been lately anyway???
 

Archilochus

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 27, 2001
Messages
1,285
Reaction score
0
I'll add this info from a very knowledgable contributor to the sci.electronics.design newsgroup. (Sir Charles Shultz III is his user name).
>>>>>
A simple infrared illuminator can be made from colored plexigals - layer pieces of blue and red.  Use an automotive bulb with a lower voltage or a current limit resistor.  Get it so you can just barely see the filament glow.  He claims this will provide near IR "light" for CCD cams and other IR photography.
<<<<<
I have never tried this.  If it works, you could kill the built in flash and have the IR illuminator light up just before a pic is taken - then turn off.  I suppose a powerful array of IR LEDs could do the same job.

Still have all those film problems though....

Archilochus
 

Bunnybuster

New member
Joined
Mar 6, 2002
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Seems to me that a digital camera with the flash disabled & replaced with an IR illuminator may be worth trying.  If only I had the time & money.
 

spectr17

Administrator
Admin
Joined
Mar 11, 2001
Messages
69,496
Reaction score
387
Bunnybuster, I think you're on to something there. I know the IR illuminators like on the Game-Vu camera have a circular arrray of IR lights.
 

Archilochus

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 27, 2001
Messages
1,285
Reaction score
0
The digital / IR illuminator might work - depends on the specific model digital cam.  There is lots of good info on this subject on the 'net.  Search "digital camera" and infrared or IR or infra red.

Good Luck!,
Archilochus
 

Archilochus

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 27, 2001
Messages
1,285
Reaction score
0
Don't have any specifics on the "known" digitals.  One important bit that the cam needs is to NOT have an IR filter  between the lens and the CCD sensor.  Many cams have some sort of IR filter - some don't, or have minimal filtering.

Here's a couple links that explain some of the things to look for in a digital cam for use in IR photography:
http://www.echeng.com/photo/infrared/
http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/infrared/

Maybe ask DB, Brian, or HillHopper to test out some of their cams as described in those sites.

Archilochus
 

Hill Hopper

Banned
Joined
Mar 10, 2002
Messages
1,570
Reaction score
0
One thing they keep talking about is the long exposure time. This could be a drawback when using IR with wildlife. Attaching a filter to my coolpix would be a piece of cake, attaching one to my Camedia D370 trailcam sounds like it would be a royal pain in the butt. Not sure of the fesability.
 

ArkansasElkHunter

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 19, 2002
Messages
1,748
Reaction score
0
I think it will come down to the light source.  All the references in the articals are about taking IR pictures in the daylight.  The filters they rerfer to filter out the nornal light and you are left with just the IR light.  I tried to take a few last night using my sony nightshot light and the s200 wouldnt pick up any thing.   It will pick up the source when pointed directly at the camcorder but it is really dim.  The artical talks about most digitals having a built in IR filter.

On a "brighter" note I took a few pictures last night with the s200 at 30, 40, 50, 60 feet.  The camers performed best when using the ISO fixed setting of 400 as opposed to the auto setting or the Long shutter mode.  The camera will save most all the user settings on powerup so it can be set where you want it.  I wouls post some of them but I had the camera in Black and white mode by accident.  I will do it again tonight and post some to look at.  Ill dig out some old horns just foy fun.
 

Archilochus

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 27, 2001
Messages
1,285
Reaction score
0
Wow! 60 feet without a slave flash - that's great!  Sounds like the digital cam to go with.

Archilochus
 


Top Bottom