Jack Rabbits

Sporty

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 7, 2001
Messages
579
Reaction score
2
I've heard mixed reviews on how they taste. I was thinking about hunting them, but I wont if they don't taste good. Give me your opinions please.
Good luck to all,
Sporty
 



QALHNTR

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 13, 2001
Messages
1,364
Reaction score
0
<font face="Tahoma">It seems like we did this last year too.  I take every one I can get.  I usually only shoot 'em while I quail hunt up in the mountains, so they're not your typical dry desert, sage eating scrub jack.  My recipe is a little long but NO ONE has ever complained.

One Jackrabbit, cleaned, skinned and jointed; liver and heart saved
One cup dry red wine
flour
3 tablespoons butter
½ lb. Bacon chopped into ½” squares
1 celery rib
1 large onion, halved and chopped
¼ lb. Or more of sliced mushrooms
1 or 2 shallots sliced in rings
3 cups of beef stock
¼ teaspoon powdered mace
5 or 6 cloves
bouquet garni of bay leaf, thyme and parsley
1 garlic clove crushed
juice of 1 lemon, plus 2 strips of shredded rind
1 ½ teaspoons melted butted mixed with equal amount of flour
port wine to taste
2 teaspoons currant jelly
brown sugar to taste


         Marinate jackrabbit for at least 24 hours turning occasionally.  Dry pieces thoroughly, dust with flour, and brown in 3 tablespoons of butter.  Place the prepared meat in a covered metal casserole or dutch oven.
In a large skillet fry the pieces of bacon until a good bit of fat appears, then scrape the bacon to one side and add onion, shallots, celery and mushrooms.  Brown until they are limp and add to the rabbit.  Cut up liver and heart, brown, and add with the bacon to the casserole.
Heat up the beef stock.  Add mace, cloves, bouquet garni, garlic, lemon juice and rind.  Pour over the jackrabbit. Cover.  Place in an oven preheated to 350F and cook for two hours, keeping it covered.  Then turn heat down to 225F and cook for at least three more hours.  Check the jackrabbit occasionally – the meat should be nearly falling off the bones.  If it is becoming dry, add stock or dry wine.
When done, remove the jackrabbit with a slotted spoon and keep warm.  Put the casserole on the stove over low heat and add the thoroughly mixed butter and flour to the pot and stir.  Add a sufficiency of port and stir.  Do not bring to a boil.  Add currant jelly and stir.  Taste.  Add brown sugar if needed.  When you have a smooth sauce, pour it over the jackrabbit and serve.

Great, now my belly is rumbling!</font>:weep-yellow:
 

Mojave

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 25, 2001
Messages
232
Reaction score
0
Wow, QALHNTR, that recipe would probably make a brick, or a coyote backstrap taste good! 2 quick questions, before they fling this post over to "recipes": Is mace the same as nutmeg, or the outer part, or something that tastes like it? Also, do you use the whole rind for the bitter taste effect, or just the zest?
 

QALHNTR

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 13, 2001
Messages
1,364
Reaction score
0
<font face="Tahoma">Mojave,
I started out with jackrabbit, but I've done quail, wild boar, an old freezer duck and the recipe works on them all.  It's a little long, but that's why we have a bottle of wine with us.</font>:boozin:
<font face="Tahoma">Yes, mace is the red cover of the nutmeg shell.  After drying out it turns yellowish (I don't know why I remember this).  It's easy to find in the spice section and I've substituted for it before.  For the rind, I just use what I have.  Sometimes, I'll use orange peel or throw in some lemon pepper.  It doesn't seem to be a big factor.</font>
 

songdog

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 5, 2001
Messages
2,054
Reaction score
0
That's quite a recipe... I'm still not sure I'd be willing to give coyote a second try but if so, this would be the way to do it.

Just remember to check the jack rabbits for worms.  They seem to get them quite a bit more than the cottontails shot out of the identical area.

(Edited by songdog at 2:32 pm on Aug. 1, 2002)
 


Top Bottom