Klamath Water

Scank

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Anyone know what's going on with the Klamath water case? I understand the District Judge has ruled that the Federal Government must pay farmers the entire cost of not being able to plant a crop. This action is most likely going to be appealed. Does anyone know what the Judge decided on water for waterfowl?
 

jerry d

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Don't know much about the lawsuit except todays newspaper said the Water District lost their case.

Also said the Feds were given $2 million two years ago to drill wells and Gov. "Blackout" Davis has thrown $5 million in the pot for the same purpose.

If 2 million was appropriated two years ago why aren't wells on line today.

How many wells can be drilled for $7 million. Oh, forgetful me -  Let's see, with the way most gov. agencies operate $5 million should just about cover the administrative cost which leaves $2 mil. Oop's, forgot the cost for drilling studies. Now, when all these cost are deducted - how many wells can be drilled for $100 grand.

Just being cynical again. Sorry............
 

Duck Fan

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According to the Klamath Crisis Web Site (http://www.snowcrest.net/siskfarm/UpKlamain.htm),  "Vanishing Freedoms2" (on FOX NEWS) is due to air this weekend (Saturday, May 19 at 10 p.m. EST/ 7 p.m. PST and Sunday, May 20 at 8 p.m. EST/ 5 p.m. PST). The program exposes how an extreme environmental agenda is robbing Americans of their rights, stopping energy production,
shutting down entire industries and putting thousands out of work. The program will examine the Wildlands Project, the press to eliminate grazing on public land and abuse of the Endangered Species Act in Klamath Falls, OR.

On Tuesday, May 22 at 9 a.m. at the State Capitol, Room 437 in Sacramento,  the California Assembly Water, Parks, & Wildlife Committee will hold hearings on the Klamath Basin Crisis.



At least that is what was stated on their "Crisis" site.....
 

E A Hunt

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Extensive engineering analysis and test drilling was done in the summer of 2000 for the wells.
The timetable for development of these wells is August thorugh december 2001.

The wells will provide 25% of the total annual needed for Lower Klamath Refuge.

There still needs to be a archeological clearance and a well drilling contract formulated.

This info came from the Spring newsletter from LK
 

Mike Riley

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There are already quite a few wells in the Basin.  Many are currently pumping and there will be some grain on private lands.  Good for birds, but won't really help most hunter unless you lease a field or go with a guide who does.  The drawback to wells is the water table in the Basin is not that good.  That is part of the reason it is taking so long to drill more wells.  In the long run wells could do quite a bit of damage in the Basin.  There seems to be a need for more above ground water storage in the Basin (reservoirs and lakes).  This could provide more water for Ag. and wetlands when it is needed and would not damage the water table in the high desert known as the Klamath Basin.
 

JForgy

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Office of the Secretary

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 6, 2001
Contact:  Mark Pfeifle 202/208-6416 or
Jeff McCracken 916/978-5100

SECRETARY NORTON ANNOUNCES COOPERATIVE EFFORT TO FREE UP ADDITIONAL
WATER FOR LOWER KLAMATH NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

(Washington) - Thanks to PacificCorp, the Tulelake Irrigation District, and local area farmers, a total of about 6,300 acre-feet of additional water has been earmarked for the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge in September 2001.

The Bureau of Reclamation is coordinating this action with the parties and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which manages the refuge. Conveyance of the water, which is expected to meet the Klamath refuge water needs for the month of September, will begin on Tuesday, Sept. 11.

"I commend PacificCorp, Tulelake Irrigation District, and local irrigators for helping with this critical water for the refuge," Interior Secretary Gale Norton said. "Their contributions will be an enormous boost for the refuge water supply and the bald eagles and other precious wildlife that historically inhabit the area in the late fall and winter."

PacificCorp has donated 2,000 acre-feet; the Tulelake Irrigation District will provide 2,000 acre-feet by exchange; and local irrigators are providing the remaining 2,300 acre-feet.

The parties engaged in the mediation process presided over by Judge Thomas Coffin of the U.S. District Court continue to work to find water to meet the refuge water needs for the coming months.

- DOI -
 

huntducks

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I've got it, we could get all the anti hunters to go up there a pi$$ in the ponds along with 5gals of arrowhead.
 
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