Lion Stalking- Be careful my fellow bowhunters!

Abourda

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I know a trapper who has done a lot of work in the past for DFG. His claim is that a human will lose 100% of the time to a lion. I was telling him all this grandiose talk and he started laughing hysterically. I personally am extremely happy that there are a lot of lions around Berkley. Hell, round up all the lions in Cali and put them in the Bay area.

DFG Bear,
I know that there are a lot of mountain lion problems where LE has to get involved for one reason or another. Why are these not being publicized? Is it due to a liberal media brainwashing the general public, or is it deliberately being kept secret?
 

DFG_Bear

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DFG Bear,
I know that there are a lot of mountain lion problems where LE has to get involved for one reason or another. Why are these not being publicized? Is it due to a liberal media brainwashing the general public, or is it deliberately being kept secret?
We don't have the time to issue a press release for all activities that we do on a daily basis. As a department, we probably respond to 10 calls regarding lions per week. Most of the time, we simply take good notes and offer some helpful insights to prevent an incident. Rough guess is that we move or dispatch about 8-10 lions per year (we only do this for lions posing an imminent threat to public safety). You'll typically hear about those in the media. We issue about 150 depredation permits per year, of which only about 100 lions are killed per year. We don't kill depredating lions - usually federal trappers.

Marc
 

Kentuck

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Two weeks ago we received an email notice here at work that a lion had been seen the day before outside one of our building. I work in San Ramon right along 680.
 

tony270

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Never stop fighting...

Old News:
77 year old man fight off cougar, complete story at this link:
http://www.salon.com/people/feature/2002/02/12/cougar/index.html

Sub Quote:
Neither you nor I nor any being on earth is prepared to face a cougar attack," Hall said. "When it happened to me, I felt his jaw on my head and the blood running down, but I survived, because I was given inside instruction from the Holy Spirit -- in split-seconds the message came to me, and it saved my life.
Sub Quote:
"Now, at that moment, with his jaws around my neck, I was reminded, I was made conscious, that the Holy Spirit, the Spirit within me, my innermost being, is more than one billion times faster than a cougar. I went hot with the thought of it, hot all over, my mental faculties turned razor sharp. Instantly, I remembered an old rule: If ever attacked by a dog, place your hand behind the lower canine teeth on the lower jaw and you can control that animal. Bang! Never hesitated! My right thumb went in one side of that big jaw and my left forefinger and middle finger went in the other, I pulled down and pulled those ugly teeth out of my neck, and there's blood everywhere in the snow, and those canines are cutting my hands. I believe I am the only living man to deliberately place his hands in the mouth of an attacking cougar.


African Bushman kills lion with bear hands and spear, only to be killed by hyenas soon afterwards.
http://bigcatnews.blogspot.com/2007/11/man-kills-lion-hyenas-kill-man.html


Man kills bobcat with bear hands:
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,284635,00.html

End..

It looks like in two of the three attacks the cat was injured or sick. In the case of the mountain lion attack, it had porcupine quills in its mouth and was starving. The bobcat had rabies, and the Bushman used his hands and a spear.
 

suavegato

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WOW, this thread has certainly taken an "interesting" turn... Wonder who would win in a fight between a lion and a chupacabra???
 

map

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Seems reasonable. At higher densities, younger lions will typically be forced out of remote areas into adjacent urban settings. I've heard lots of lion sighting reports coming from the Berkely/Redwood City/Livermore areas. Sightings typically spike when the young are being forced out.
Marc,

Here is one of our urban lions: It was sometime before 2005 when I was visiting V. A. Hospital in Livermore, and the patients were telling me about a lion that they seen on a regular basis. The hospital is just below the west side of the Del Valle dam, so I setup my trail camera above the dam on the park side.

That lioness never got into trouble that I know of, and probably died from old age? What I learned was that a fear came over me every time I checked my camera. Not just caution, but an instinctive fear that I couldn't bring under control. I don't want to sound like a liberal, but we can't blame the lions for our own fear.

These pictures were taken in quick succession on 35mm film, and the second shot looks like the lioness was ready defend her self? When their rump is high, I guess they are ready to spring? Is that correct?

.
 

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Common Sense

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WOW, this thread has certainly taken an "interesting" turn... Wonder who would win in a fight between a lion and a chupacabra???

As an old friend of mine use to say: The problem with getting into a fight with a pole-cat is even if you win you still smell like chit.

They ain't no winning if you get into a fight with a lion. Cause even if you win you are going to wish it never happened.
 

suavegato

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Cep't fer I always thought it would make one hell of a cool scar... A lion's claw down your arm or back etc. But that is probably the ONLY upside and NOT worth tempting fate...
 

quicknick

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op- I noticed youre from central ca. Im from atascadero, where were you when this happened just out of curiosity.
 

DFG_Bear

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These pictures were taken in quick succession on 35mm film, and the second shot looks like the lioness was ready defend her self? When their rump is high, I guess they are ready to spring? Is that correct?

.
Could be that the camera startled the cat when the shutter closed. Could also be aspect of terrain. Cats' normal stance is a little lower in front than in rear. Crouched low in the front simply means they're preparing to move quickly.
 

biseger

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Never stop fighting...

Old News:
77 year old man fight off cougar, complete story at this link:
http://www.salon.com/people/feature/2002/02/12/cougar/index.html

Sub Quote:

Sub Quote:


African Bushman kills lion with bear hands and spear, only to be killed by hyenas soon afterwards.
http://bigcatnews.blogspot.com/2007/11/man-kills-lion-hyenas-kill-man.html


Man kills bobcat with bear hands:
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,284635,00.html

End..

It looks like in two of the three attacks the cat was injured or sick. In the case of the mountain lion attack, it had porcupine quills in its mouth and was starving. The bobcat had rabies, and the Bushman used his hands and a spear.
Fight untill your dead. Tapping into the "spirit within me" is a skill some people can controll and some need the life and death situation to tap in to it. When you have tapped into it you are on another level "my mental faculties turned razor sharp" and your real speed and power are realized. Time seams to slow and in that moment I believe you are trully wild.
 

map

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Could be that the camera startled the cat when the shutter closed. Could also be aspect of terrain. Cats' normal stance is a little lower in front than in rear. Crouched low in the front simply means they're preparing to move quickly.
Interesting!

I had the 35mm film developed at Costco, and the gal behind the counter thought that I went out into the woods at night to snap the pictures. I assured her that the lion would have heard my heart pounding if I was out there in person.

From what I have read, the Cougars in the Santa Anas, well, I guess those are the Palomar Mountains in Orange county?, are not doing well at all. Many of the big cats have been run down crossing the freeway.

Has anything been learned about the corridors that these young Cougar transits use? They would need some friendly habitat to travel through in order to get from the Santa Anas up here to the Diablo Mountains where the lions thrive. Up here we have so many lions that they are seen sneaking around in the urban areas.
 

DeanW66

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This is an informational and useful thread. DFG_Bear thanks for your contributions.

Recently my wife tivo'd a show about Mt Lion attacks. It basically reported about Vancouver Island, in British Columbia. I don't recall the exact %, but it was large like 80% or 90%, of all known Cougar attacks in North America occurred on VI.
 

DeanW66

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Oh yeah, and maybe this thread could be moved to a more general area since I think it would be of interest to many different kinds of hunters not just blacktail? Or should somebody post new threads all over pointing to this one as the primary discussion one?
 

DFG_Bear

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From what I have read, the Cougars in the Santa Anas, well, I guess those are the Palomar Mountains in Orange county?, are not doing well at all. Many of the big cats have been run down crossing the freeway.

Has anything been learned about the corridors that these young Cougar transits use? They would need some friendly habitat to travel through in order to get from the Santa Anas up here to the Diablo Mountains where the lions thrive. Up here we have so many lions that they are seen sneaking around in the urban areas.
I keep tabs on the University-run lion research projects we have in California. The study in the Santa Anas is really looking into the corridor aspect. Freeway and housing developments can really fragment a lion's ability to traverse the landscape, which can potentially lead to genetic problems like those found in the African Cheetas. Too few cats to breed causes inbreeding. Inbreeding lessens genetic diversity, which can lead to many disease issues. The same may be true about deer in the Santa Anas, but I'm not sure if anyone's researching that. If this is a concern for you, I would suggest you contact your local planning commissions to ensure that viable habitats are maintained which can support wildlife movements.

That being said, I'd venture to say that vehicle collisions are a primary cause of mortality in mountain lions, at least in California.
 

DFG_Bear

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Recently my wife tivo'd a show about Mt Lion attacks. It basically reported about Vancouver Island, in British Columbia. I don't recall the exact %, but it was large like 80% or 90%, of all known Cougar attacks in North America occurred on VI.
Approximately 60% of all verified mountain lion attacks in North America have occurred on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.
 

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