• The forum is now running on the Xenforo platform. The first time you log in here, you may have to reset your password by doing a password recovery. Your login info will be sent to the email you have listed on your account; please check your spam or junk folders if you don't see it in your inbox. If that address is invalid, obviously you won't get the email: In that case, use the contact form or the envelope icon at the top right of the header to send us your member name and a current valid email address.




Long Range Caliber

weekender21

Well-known member
I haven't personally built any long range rifles but I have had a few built for me. I would go with a hart or Krieger barrel. If you're not concerned with weight, about a #9 contour would be excellent; lots of shooting and good accuracy. I have a 24" #4 contour Krieger stainless barrel on my 270WSM. The rifle weighs about 8.5 lbs scoped. I did own a 300WM rifle with a #9 contour stainless fluted 24" Krieger barrel. The gun weighed 14 pounds in an HS Precision stock with a 30mm Leupold scope. Mcmillan and HS Precision make the best stocks out there and I've heard that Bell and Carlson stocks are good for the money; much less expensive than the other two. You definitely want to glass bed and "free float" your barrel. There is quite a bit of information available on line about that process. I would take a look on Midway USA's web site. You can find literally everything you need there.
 

weekender21

Well-known member
If you want a muzzle brake, I would go with a Vias....building a rifle isn't rocket surgery but you do need at least some machining experience if you're planning on doing things like threading a barrel for a muzzle brake. "Blue printing" your action is also a fairly complicated process too but adds to accuracy. I'm looking forward to seeing the pictures!!!
 

myfriendis410

Well-known member
Hold on here, cowboy; building a rifle adds a new dimension to this whole discussion.

If I were building a rifle I would use the .338 caliber as it has the highest potential ballistic coefficient available, I believe.

If you were to build your own gun, why not use a Lazzeroni? The guys in the desert are using a .338 Lapua. Other than short barrel life, what's the downside?

You need to start all over again and reevaluate everything from the standpoint of building a rifle from scratch. Sounds like a fun project.
 

DEERSLAM

Well-known member
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (myfriendis410 @ Jan 15 2009, 06:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Hold on here, cowboy; building a rifle adds a new dimension to this whole discussion.

If I were building a rifle I would use the .338 caliber as it has the highest potential ballistic coefficient available, I believe.

If you were to build your own gun, why not use a Lazzeroni? The guys in the desert are using a .338 Lapua. Other than short barrel life, what's the downside?

You need to start all over again and reevaluate everything from the standpoint of building a rifle from scratch. Sounds like a fun project.[/b]
I agree. This opens up a whole new discussion. The skies the limit if you plan on building a rifle from the ground up.

As far as builds go I like the Rem. 700 action. I've had very good luck with Hart barrels. Most of my custom builds wear McMillan stocks. And don't forget the trigger...it's gotta be very good. Jewel or Timney works very well. As far as caliber...............
 

weekender21

Well-known member
It would be hard to argue Lazzeroni if this was going to be a hunting rig. And yes, the caliber choices are endless. However, NikolaKangra already stated that this was a paper punching rig. Muzzle velocities over 3400fps will ware out a barrel faster than most target shooters would like. There is give and take no matter which caliber you choose. Realistically you could build a 1000 yard gun with a 6.5 and a 50 BMG making a great argument for each.

There is an absolutely endless bullet selection for any .30 caliber round ie 300WM, .308, etc. 30-378 would also be a great choice. Too many to choose from. My advice would be to do a lot more research and find out exactly what you want before you start ordering parts! I never fired a round through the 300WM custom rifle I spoke about earlier. I wanted a super accurate custom hunting rifle and ended up with a great rig but not what I wanted. Nobody wants to carry a 14lb rifle hunting in tough country no matter how accurate it is!
 

myfriendis410

Well-known member
You're right there, Andy; a 14 lb. rifle would quickly turn me into a road hunter.

You are also right in that there is a much better selection of projectiles available in .30 caliber than any other.

If you are building a custom rig, handloading is part and parcel of the whole deal so loading one of the monster calibers down somewhat is doable. That ought to help barrel life to some extent. As long as you are still supersonic at 1,000 yards, you are good.

The ultramags are also an interesting choice, and I like them from the standpoint of no belt when resizing cases. Chambering reamers and go, no-go gauges not to mention brass, would all be less expensive than lazzeroni, which maintains proprietary rights to the cartridge, according to a gunsmith friend of mine.
 

sjuels

Well-known member
So, I feel that I have to add to this conversation, which I have been following:

Take a look at the 6.5mm round (.264); Berger et al. has bullets with a BC of up to .600 and there are a number of different rounds made for this caliber.
If you do not reload, then take a look at the 6.5mm Creedmoor - it does almost everything the 264 Remington does - including having better trajectory and less wind drift than the 300 win mag, and they provide factory loads that can be used for long distance target shooting (140gr).
Also, the Creedmoor does all this at much lower pressure, which bodes well for barrel life.

I will be piecing together a rifle, from a Savage action with accu-trigger and a screw in barrel from Pac-Nor, and still arguing with myself over which stock to get (MM A5 or BC).

This rifle will be a decent target rifle for 1km and it will be light enough to kill game out at that range as well - when it comes together I will post pics and results here.

Just to add to the confusion ....

Best,
/Soren
 

bpnclark

Banned
How can someone build their own rifle before they reload? How can someone shoot “factory” ammo out of custom rifle? I have to look it up, but I think it might be against the law.
 

NikolaKangrga

Well-known member
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (bpnclark @ Jan 16 2009, 08:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
How can someone build their own rifle before they reload? How can someone shoot “factory” ammo out of custom rifle? I have to look it up, but I think it might be against the law.[/b]
I would love to learn to reload. Just have to make that leap. Still working on leaping over EVERYTHING else. I do understand what you mean by I should reload to "accurately" shoot a Long Range Rifle.
 

NikolaKangrga

Well-known member
Once again, Thank all of you for your comments. I obviously have ALOT of research and thinking to do! But you guys have deff set me up on the right track.
 

sjuels

Well-known member
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (bpnclark @ Jan 16 2009, 08:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
How can someone build their own rifle before they reload? How can someone shoot “factory” ammo out of custom rifle? I have to look it up, but I think it might be against the law.[/b]
Look at it the other way around: It's like a knit sweater: it doesn't matter where you start, if you first get one string loose, the whole thing will start to unravel.
Probably most people start with reloading and then move on to the custom rifle, but if you start by buying match grade ammo for your custom rifle, you will sooner or later not be able to sleep, before you know what your own handloads can do in this gun ...

/Soren
 


Top Bottom